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HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 




LIBRARY 



OF THE 



MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY 

Bequest of 
WILLIAM BREWSTER 



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fmLIAM BREWSTER 






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DEC 4 1920 



w, 6. 



BECEIYE 

DEC 31 



VOLUME XXII. 
NUMBER 1 



JANUARY, 1905 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 





MADE WITH GOERZ DOUBLE ANASTIGMAT LENS 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY H. H. RUSSELL 



A BACK SOMERSAULT 

Highly Commended in Rf.creation's Ninth Annual Photo Competition 



Published by G. 0. Shields (Coqvina), 23 west 24th street, new york 



A Black Bear and a White Swede; %J^^£iZ^ 



1905 

'ANNOUNCEMENT 




^&Q60^ 



A New 
Type 



We believe that the Autocar in all its types represents the highest 
excellence in automobile design, workmanship and material. Every 
Autocar is built on honor. We feel, therefore, that our new type will 
meet with a cordial reception. 

This car, Type XI, larger and more powerful than the other types, has a 
four-cylinder vertical engine of 16-20 horse-power. The body is built on the newest 
and most approved French lines. The front seat is divided and both front and rear 
seats are large and comfortable. 

While this car is built upon the tried Autocar principles which have been so 
splendidly proven, it shows a number of very important improvements making for in- 
creased simplicity, ease of operation, safety and comfort. 

In fact, though Autocars have always been noted for absence of bewildering intric- 
acy of mechanism, yet no one can but be impressed with the extreme simplicity of this 
new car. It is a triumph in scientific construction and arrangement. 

This car has more than met our highest expectations in the road test. In fact, its 
performance has been a surprise to experienced automobile men. The power of the car 
carries it, fully equipped and loaded with five passengers, up tested 12 per cent, grades 
for instance, at 20 to 25 miles per hour on the direct drive, while on the level the car at- 
tains a speed of 40 to 45 miles. The car is a superior climber on any hill. 

Altogether our eight years' experience has enabled us to produce in this type, a four 
cylinder car we are assured cannot be surpassed by any similar car at any price. 

The Price of Type XI is $2,000. Ready for delivery January 16. 

Type V1I1. Four-passenger Car at $1.400 and Type X, Runabout at $900 

have made Autocar Reputation, Each stands at the head of its class for value 
and efficiency. 

Autocars, Types VIII, X and XI will be on exhibition at the New 
York Automobile Show, Madison Square Garden. 

Catalogue descriptive of the 1904-1905 types will be sent free upon request. This 
Catalogue contains also addresses of our dealers throughout the country 
who will be glad to give demonstrations to prospective automobile pur- 
chasers and explain in detail the merits of our cars. 

THE AUTOCAR COMPANY, Ardmore, Pa. 

Member Association of Licensed 
Autotnjbile Manufacturers. 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1904, by G. O. Shields 
A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



J1.00 a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New Yore 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER page 

He Saw a Big Bear with a Pig in Its Arm Frontispiece 

A Black Bear and a White Swede Frank Mossman 

How a Mexican Was Turned Back. Illustrated Arizona Ranger 

He Loved the Woods. Poem Stacy E. Baker 

On Top of Mount Shasta. Illustrated — . A.L. A. Himmelwright 

After Moose in Ontario D . R. Tucker 

An Ideal Game Preserve. Illustrated G. O. Shields 

Contrasts. Poem CO. Woodmansee 

A Beminiscence of the Old Dominion R. G. Kinnier 

A Plain Tale of the Woods , F. A. Verplanck 

A New Year's Call E. H. Blood 

The Bears' Picnic. Poem Geo. A. Williams. M. D. 

Not So Hard As It Looks. Illustrated R. D. Von Nieda 

Roast Pork. Poem E. L. Taylor 

Some Other Dog3 Della Bellamy 

Reflections. Poem Dan W. Gallagher 

Antoine's Hen Speculation E.W. Parker 

The Amateur Trappers. II Charley Apopka 

Old Man Stice's Experience with the Bear W. F, Short, Jr. 

A Colorado Paradise L. D. Gilmore 

From the Game Fields 36 Forestry — 57 

Fish and Fishing 42 Pureand ImpureFoods 59 



2S 
25 
26 
27 
2S 
30 

3* 
33 
35 

70 



Guns and Ammunition 45 

Natural History 50 

The League of American Sportsmen 53 

Automobile Notes 55 



Book Notices 61 

Publisher's Notes 63 

Editor's Corner 65 

Amateur Photography 72. 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post Office, Oct. 17, ii 



MENNEN'S 

Borated Talcum 

TOILET POWDER 



FOR 




Insist that your barber uses Mennen's Toilet Powder 
after he shaves you. It is antiseptic, and will PREVENT 
any of the many skin diseases often contracted. A posi- 
tive relief for CHAPPED HANDS, CHAFING, 
and ALL SKIN AFFLICTIONS Removes all odor 
of perspiration. (Jet JVFennen's— the original Sold 
everywhere, or maled for 25 cents. Sample Free. 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., NEWARK, N- J. 

Som New inK Mennen's Violet Talcum 5ffi 




Cures 



Sore Throat 

A Harmless Antiseptic. 

Endorsed by the medical profes- 
sion. Send ten cents to pay postage 
on free trial bottle. Sold by 
Leading Druggists. Not genuine 
unless label bears my signature: 

F-59 Prince St., N. Y. 



Write for free booklet on Rational Treatment of 
Disease. 



. 



4s, 



11 



RECREATION. 



RACINE BOAT MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

===== MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN ===== 




Our Turbine Motor Hunting Boat, as shown above, is 16 feet long, draws loaded only 
10 inches-of water, is fitted with our 3 H. P. motor and underwater exhaust. No springs, 
no valves ; no clicks — as noiseless as a Row Boat. Speed 6 miles per hour. Operation 
and satisfaction guaranteed for $275. Cheaper ones if you want them. 




Our Canvas Cedar Paddling Canoe, as. shown above, is 14 feet long, will carry four in 
a pinch and is built for service. A comfortable and easy paddler. Price, F. O. B., $30 — 
no extras. 



1 ' 




. 








£$?■* 








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Our Still Hunter, as shown, 11^ feet 
long, 36 inches wide, built of White Cedar, 
will carry 600 lbs., weight only 80 lbs. 
Ample room under deck for decoys. Light 
weight, light draught, very stiff, very still 
and very cheap. Price, complete with 
paddle $20, F. O. B. 



Our 15-foot Fishing Motor Boat is the 
"Limit." Has 4 foot beam, draws 12 
inches, speed 6 miles per hour, seats four to 
five, will carry 1,000 lbs. 1 H. P. motor, 
operation guaranteed. Built of Cedar, 
natural finish, brass trimmed, a good 
troller, a good guide to the fishing grounds 
and a sure returner. We have them in 
stock at our various warehouses— price $165. Money refunded if not satisfied. 

Send 10c for our 64-page catalog describing the others, and we will tell you the ad- 
dress of our nearest showrooms. If y«u haven't the stamps handy drop a postal. 

Mention Recreation 
Address: RACINE BOAT MFG. CO., (Riverside) MUSKEGON, MICH. 




^33«3E53HBC 



RECREATION. 



111 



CONTROLLING AN AUTOMOBILE 
BY AIR-PRESSURE 



BY LOYD A. THOMAS 



k^r-TMHE Driver lost Control of his Car!" 

That's part of the Newspaper report 
on nearly every automobile accident. 

Doesn't it set one thinking? 
- The most important thing about an Automo- 
bile is its method of Speed-control. 

Mere Horse-power is secondary to this! 

Many cheap Motors develop high power, while 
they last, — but they wear out in a hurry, and are 
unreliably controlled. 

ManyAutomobiles are controlled by expanding 
Speed-Governors. These have many wearing parts. 
They have revolving fly-out Arms, Springs, 
Gears, Belts, or Shafts, with special Levers to 
operate thern. 

They work well enough, while new. But, — 
Wear, Rough Roads, Overheating, or poor Lubri- 
cation, may put them out of adjustment, at 
critical periods. 

Then there's another item for the Press. 

The Speed-controlling system of a Car can't 
be too simple. 

It can't have too few parts to get out of order. 
It can't be too direct, too flexible, too graduated, 
too Automatic, nor too Reliable. 

Even a Dare- Devil Driver can do more daring 
things, with a Car, when he knows he can ab- 
solutely depend on its Speed-control working at 
the precise moment, and to the precise degree, 
he expects it to work. 

This is where the "Winton of 1905" scores 
over all other Motor Cars. 



The speed of the Winton Motor Car is con- 
trolled by Air-pressure. 

No Gears to wear out, no Springs to weaken, 
no Levers to stick, at critical moments. This is 
why Winton "Air Control" gives such absolute 
security. 

When the Winton Motor starts running, it at 
•once compresses enough Air to cut off its own 
supply of Gas, in a half-minute. And a Motor 
must stop running when the Gas is shut off 
from its Cylinders. 

The Winton Cylinders can only receive Gas 
when you purposely spill some of the Air-pressure 
that throttles it. 

This Air-pressure is released (or spilled) by 
merely pressing your right Foot on a spring Pedal 
beside tti3 Steering Shaft. 

The more you press that Pedal the faster the 
•Car travels. 

The less you press it the slower the Winton 
Car runs. 

Take your foot off the Pedal and the Car 
stops altogether. 

Isn't that simple, safe, and easy to remember 
in emergencies? No Valves to turn, no Gauges 
«to watch, no Levers to move. v 

With this one Pedal alone, and using the 

l-speed clutch, you can run Four miles an hour, 



hgh- 



or Forty miles an hour, or any speed between 
these two. No arbitrary half -speed, quarter- 
speed, nor full-speed Levers to consider, in ordi- 
nary running of the 1905 Winton. 

Your foot on the Pedal sets the Pace as per- 
fectly as if you were walking or running. 

Think of the sure control this gives you, — 
the freedom from risk or anxiety, and the time 
saved in learning the Car. 

A Youth could run a Winton the first time he 
rode in it, after an hour's coaching. 

But, — no Car except the Winton can use this 
Air-pressure Control. Because, it is a basic 
Winton-Patented feature. 



Then, there's the Winton Steering Gear of 
1905. Observe that it is not a "Worm Gear," 
like the others. 

The thread of a Worm wears down in the 
center long before the sides wear. Then you 
have "lost motion" in the Steering Gear. That 
"lost motion" makes steering mighty uncertain 
sometimes. 

It upsets the Driver's calculations, and so 
may lead to serious accident in running through 
crowded streets or close quarters. 

If you tighten up the wear on a Worm steer- 
ing gear it is then liable to "wedge" in the nut, 
when you turn sharply on short curves. 

That may land you in a ditch. 

No "lost motion" nor "wedging" is possible 
with the Winton Steering Gear of 1905. 

Because, it has a whole-round thread on the 
steering shaft. 

This works in a whole-round nut. 

The thread must therefore wear evenly all 
around when wheel is turned to left or right. 

Your life may some day depend on the accu- 
rate control this patented Winton feature gives. 



The 1905 Winton has been made the most 
accessible car in existence. 

Nearly all Wintons have in the past had 
Horizontal Two-Cylinder Motors. 

These were necessarily placed undei the 
forward seat. 

But, — this year it's different. 

The Winton Vertical Four-Cylinder Motor is 
placed forward of the dash-board, under a hood, 
where it is instantly accessible. 

When you lift off its Aluminum Cover every 
working part (except the Transmission Gear) 
may be seen at a glance. 

Pistons, Crank Shaft and Connecting Rods 
may be quickly removed, without disturbing 
Cylinders or other Motor parts. 

The four upright Cylinders are fed Gas (Gaso- 
line and Air, Mixture) by one single Carburetor. 

No changing of Mixture is necessary with the 
1905 Winton. Its Carburetor is permanently set 



IV 



RECREATION. 



so as to produce one standard grade of (Gasoline and Air) 
Mixture, at all times, No experimenting: with Mixture 
needed, lots of trouble avoided,— lots of adjusting: saved. 

The Winton speed control supplies more, or less, of 
this standard grade Gas, to the Cylinders, at will, but never 
tampers with its quality. 

All Four Cylinders are "fired" by one sing-le Magneto. 

This is positive Gear-driven, instead of being chain or 
friction-driven. It thus gives absolutely regular, and con- 
tinuous ignition, no matter how rough the roads, nor how 
great the vibration from any cause. 

No Dry Batteries, Vibrators, Storage Batteries nor 
"Accumulators," needed with a 1905 Winton. 

Think of the worry, detail, "tinkering,'' and expense 
this cuts out,— the Simplicity it affords. 

Under the floor-board (between front seat and dash- 
board) is the Winton Transmission Gear. Lift up that 
board and you see the Aluminum Gear case. Turn a 
handle, and part of that case comes off. 

Then you have, right under your eye, the three non- 
breakable clutches,— two forward and one reverse. 

These can be removed bodily, in a few minutes time, 
without getting under sides, or body, of car. 

The Dust-pan beneath the 1905 Winton is permanently 
fixed there. Because, there is no longer any need to look 
belowthe floor of the car, or below the base of Motor, as all 
parts are reached readily from above. 

No other Vertical Motor Car is half so Accessible. 

Now, note the new Twin-Springs of the 1905 Winton. 

The upper Spring, for light loads, and good roads. 
This gives a motion easy as that of a Pullman Parlor Car. 

The lower Spring reinforces the upper, for heavy loads. 

Prevents pounding of Carriage body, and Motor, when 
running over rough roads, crossing railway tracks, or 
" thank-ye-mums." 

The twin-springs are shackled together at each end. 
They thus work together, but do not touch, except when 
carrying a heavy load, or bouncing hard at high speed. 

These twin-springs double the comfort of riding in an 
Automobile. They add 30% to the life of a Motor, in pro- 
tecting it from jar, pounding, and vibration. 

They take nearly half the work off the Tires. 



They make the whole carriage lively, smooth-running, 
elastic in action, and permit of much greater speed over 
rough roads. 

These twin-springs can be had on no other Motor-Car 
but the 1905 Winton because they are protected. 

Another 1905 Winton feature is the Automatic Oiler. 

This feeds Oil, to every friction spot, in exact propor- 
tion to the speed Motor is running at. Impossible to 
siphon, or flood the motor. No springs nor valves. 

The Cylinders of the 1905 Winton are cooled by rapid 
circulation of anon-freezing Fluid(Polar Compound). This 
is pumped around them, Carburetor and Exhaust-valve 
chambers, then back into Fin Radiator, for cooling. 

Behind the Radiator is a gear-driven fan, and in the 
fly-wheel is cast another. These two Fans pull the air 
between the pipes and fins of the Radiator so fast that the 
fluid is thus cooled rapidly. 

The Fans act and the Fluid circulates, even when the 
Car is standing still, if the Motor be running at all. 

The 1905 Winton therefore has the advantage of both 
" Water-cooled" and "Air-cooled "systems combined. 

Winton Style is proverbial. But, the 1905 Winton is 
the most graceful design yet produced. People call it 
" the Winton Greyhound." Because, it has such long - , 
graceful, racy looking lines. See the picture below. 

That shows the $1800.00 Winton for the year 1905. 

It has practically the same Power as last year's $2500 
Winton. 

But, it weighs nearly a thousand pounds less, and so 
has more speed, per Horse-power. 

Because, the Motor has less weight to propel. 

The $2500.00 "Winton of 1905" has 24-Horse power. 

Length is 150 inches, Wheel-base 102 inches. 

The $3500.00 "Winton of 1905" has 40-Horse-power. 

Length 154 inches ; Wheel-base 106 inches. 

The $4500.00 " Winton of 1905" is 40 H. P. Limousine. 

Duplicate parts, for repair, are carried constantly in 
stock, and shipped instantly on receipt of telegram. That's 
a mighty important consideration. 

Write today for new Winton Catalogue. Address 

The Winton Motor Carriage Co., Dept. J, Cleveland, O. 




The WINTON c/1905 

Vertical, Four-Cylinder Motor. 



16 Horse Power $1,800 

24 Horse Power $2,500 

40 Horse Power. .... .$3,500 

40 H.P. «' Special" ..$4,500 



RECREATION. 



4 






& 




■c**"*'^" 





CABIN CRUISER 

Orders for Cabin Boats should be placed 
early to give the necessary time for their 
construction. We would be glad to treat 
with interested parties. Submit plans, etc. 

NAPHTHA, ALCO-VAPOR and GASOLENE 

LAUNCHES AND AUTO=BOATS 

STEAM and SAIL 

YACHTS 



We also build the 

SPEEDWAY 

MOTOR CAR 



Send 10 cents in stamps for new 
Illustrated Catalogue 




Gas Engine & Power Co. ^JE*^ 



and 



Chas. H. Seabury & Co. Chicago office: 

(consolidated) 1409 Michigan Ave. 







VI 



RECREATION. 




Where are you going 

NEXT SUMMER? 

No matter where, you will need 
some things to complete your 
camping, fishing or hunting outfit. 

Fishing Tackle 
Guns, Ammunition 
Boats, Sleeping Bags 

or something of the kind. 
And this is the time to buy. 



The wise man- takes time by the forelock* 
The other man never buys anything until 
he gets ready to use it. Then he is liable 
to have to wait a week, or a month, before 
he can get it. 

Get Our Catalogue "R" NOW 

Make up your orders, send them in and 
we will do the rest. Then, when you get 
ready to go to the woods or to the moun- 
tains you can go, while the other fellows 
stay at home, wait for their outfits and swear. 

Address 

Abercrombie & Fitch Co. 



314 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 



Mention RECREATION 



RECREATION. 



Vll 



J. M. Hanson's Clubbing Offers 



LEXINGTON, KY. 



NEW SUBSCRIPTION OFFER FOR 

W/>e YOUTH'S COMPANION 

Every New Subscriber who remits at once $1 .73 to J. M. Hanson, Lexington, Ky., will receive: 
E™^-^ 4~± All of the issues of The Companion for the remaining weeks of 1904; 
dl CC tne Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Double Numbers; the 
'^*^~* Companion's "'Carnation" Calendar for 1905, in 12 colors and gold, 
and the Youth's Companion for the 52 weeks of 1905— a library of the best read- 
ing for every member of the family, Address 

J. M. HANSON'S MAGAZINE AGENCY. LEXINGTON, KY. 



The periodicals in any c'iub offer will be sent to 
one or different addresses. Join with your friends 
and divide the cost. 

The subscriptions maybe new or renewals. 
B^" All Subscriptions are tor one full year. 



LADIES' HOME JOURNAL, $1.0o 
SATURDAY EVENING POST, 2.00 



2- 25 



Regular Price Our Club Price 

Recreation and The Housekeeper (or Ladies' World) . $i.6o - $1.25 

Recreation, Cosmopolitan and Pearson's (or Leslie's Mo.) 3.00 . 2.00 

Recreation, Outing, Success and The Smart Set • 7*50 - 4.50 

Recreation, Success, Leslie's Monthly and Pearson's • 4.00 . 2.50 

Recreation, Woman's Home Companion and Cosmopolitan 3* 00 - 2.10 

Recreation, Success and World's Work (or Outing) • 5.00 . 3.00 

Recreation, Review of Reviews and Leslie's Monthly . 4-5° - 3*25 

Recreation, Physical Culture, Cosmopolitan and Leslie's Mo. 4°° - 2.50 

Recreation, House Beautiful, Oviting and Success . 7-°° - 3.50 

Recreation, Country Life in America and Cosmopolitan 5- 00 - 4.00 



Recreation . 1 vear, $1.00 

Review of Reviews " 2.50 
Outing . . " 3.00 

Success . . " 1.00. 



Our Club 
Price 

$4.50 



< 

Recreation 
Outdoor Life 
Cosmopolitan . 
Pearson's (or Leslie's) " 



1 year, $1.00 
1.00 



Our Club 
Price 



LOOJ H*<<£»<~>" 



Recreation . 
American Field 
Pearson's . 

Outdoor Life 



1 year, $1.00 
4.00 
1.00 
1.00. 



Our Club 

Price 

$5.75 



Recreation . i year, $1.00 ~ 

World's Work (or 

Outing) . " 3.00 

Lippincott's Magazine 1 ' 2.50. 



Our Club 
Price 

$4.25 



Recreation . i year, $1.00" 

Physical Culture " 1.00 
Success or Leslie's " 1.00 
Outing . . " 3.00, 



Our Club 
Price 

$5.50 



Recreation . 
The Smart Set 
Cosmopolitan 
The Housekeeper 



i year, $1.00 
2.50 
1.00 
.60. 



Our Club 
Price 

$3.25 



Recreation 
Scribner's Magazine " 
Outdoor Life • 



i year, $1.00 1 Our Club 



3.oo r 



Price 



i.ooJ ^Pt'«^-5 



Recreation . i year, $1.00 
St. Nicholas . " 3.00 

Leslie's (or Cosmop'n) " 1.00. 



Our Club 
Price 

$4.00 



Recreation . i year, $1.00 

Century Magazine " 4.00 



Our Club 
Price 

$4.50 



Recreation . i year, $1.00 

Cosmop'n (or Leslie's) " 1.00 
Outing . . " 3.00. 



Our Club 
Price 

$3.25 



ONE MAGAZINE FREE 

Any customer sending us 3 combinations to any 
of the above (except the Ladies' Home Journal offer) 
may have free and sent to any address desired a 
year's subscription to Recreation, or Success, 
or Leslie's Monthly, or Cosmopolitan. 



YOU MAY ADD 

to these Clubs 

Harper's Magazine.. .$3.35 Ainslee's $1.80 

The Century 3.65 Ladies' Home Journal. 1. 00 

St. Nicholas 2.65 Saturday Evening Post, 1.25 

McClure's 1.00 Munsey's Magazine.... 1.00 

Delineator 1.00 Everybody's Magazine, 1.00 

Harper's Weekly 3.35 Scribner's 2.85 

(Scribner's separately costs $3.00 per year.) 



Club Raisers and Agents Wanted 



to take orders for our combina- 
tion offers. Liberal commission 
paid. Our large 44-page catalogue contains about 3,000 publications and club offers 

at low prices. Write for it now and see how much you can save. pP"IT'S FREE. 






Address j. m. hanson raS°H*;. E o:°. E ^ Lexington, ky. 

^DON'T FORGET TO ASK FOR OUR CATALOGUE OF CLUB OFFERS. 






Vlll 



RECREATION. 



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RECREATION. 



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X 



RECREATION. 




DANGER IN SIGHT, by Carl Rungius 
Size 11 x 14. Price 60c. 



RECREATION 

Readers are now offered 
A NEW SERIES OF 

WILD ANIMAL 

and HUNTING 
PICTURES 

with which to 

DECORATE THEIR DENS 

Here are three sample illustrations 



■d 

U 

o 
"o 
U 

C 

X 



THE LIST INCLUDES: 
DANGER IN SIGHT, Carl Rungius, size 11x14 
ANTICIPATION, W. H. Drake, size 11x14 
SPORT IN THE MARSHES, E. V. Brewer, size 26x32 
A DASH FOR COVER, Geo. A. King, size 22x28 
THE LAST STAND, Ernest T. Seton, size 16x20 
HIS ANTLERED MAJESTY, Carl Rungius, size 16x20 
THE FIRST SNOW, R. M. Shurtleff, size 20x24 
THE FRONTIER MAIL, De Cost Smith, size 26x32 
Sent to any point in the United States, Canada or Mexico, 

No more attractive series of pictureshas ever 
been offered to sportsmen, and the prices 
are such that any man of moderate means 
may well afford to ornament his walls with 
scenes that will bring home to himself and 
friends delightful recollections of days afield. 

Remit by P.O. or express money order, or New York draft. Address 

Gfl CHTET T\Q 23 WEST 24th STREET 
• U» OniELlJj NEW YORK CITY 

These pictures are made by the Alfred S. Campbell 4ft Co., mid are 
all exquisitely baud-colored 



post-paid. 



Colored 

$ .60 

150 
2. 

2. 

2.50 
2.50 

7.5o 





SPORT IN THE MARSHES, by E. V. Brewer 
Size 26x32. Price $2. 



A DASH FOR COVER, by Geo. A. KING- 
Size 22 x 28. Price $2. 



RECREATION. 



XI 








*sgwiP 



5fe**fc 



SOU TIKI IE IF: ITS 
PALM LIMITED 



:;.:■;:, « 






w^ 



NEW YORK AND ST. AVGVSTINE 

This famous, luxurious train resumes service January 9th for Season 1905 

Composed exclusively : Club, Dining- Compartment, Drawing and Stateroom, Sleeping and Library 
and Observation Cars. Attached to this train is Drawing and Stateroom Sleeping Car to Aiken and 

Augusta. _____ Now York offi. e. ^tt and i r«i Broadway : 

AI.I'.X. S. THWEATT, Eastern Passenger Agrent. 
S. II. HARDWICK, Passensrer Traffic Manager. 
I Washington, D. C. W. H. TAYLOE, Gen. Pass. Agent. 



Xll 



RECREATION. 



SPEND THE WINTER OUT OF DOORS. 



PINEHURST 






North 
Carolina 

(Founded by James W. Tufts) 



The Ideal Resort, Located in the 
Heart of the Long Leaf Pine Region 




13INEHURST is a private estate, covering a 
territory about ten miles square, located 
about 700 feet above the sea, and singularly 
favored as regards -climate. Xhis region enjoys 
an unusual percentage of bright, sunny days, 
and is absolutely free from damp or penetrating 
winds. 

For the accommodation of guests there are 




FOUR SPLENDID 

HOTELS 
FIFTY COTTAGES 



All under one management and 
ownership. Rates at hotels range 
from $2.50 per day upward. 



TWO EXCELLENT 
COLF COURSES 



which are acknowledged to be the best in the South, 
offer ample opportunity to the golf novice and expert 
alike. The annual North and South Championship 
Tournament is held on the Pinehurst links as a regular 
fixture. 



A 35,000 ACRE 
SHOOTING PRESERVE 



has been set aside for the exclusive use of guests, and 
guides, dogs, and conveyances are always ready for a 
day's sport with the birds. 

GOLF, SHOOTING and TENNIS TOURNA- 
MENTS are held weekly for appropriate trophies. 

A fine Preparatory School under direction of A. G. 
Warren, headmaster, enables parents to bring their 
children to Pinehurst without interruption of their course 
of study. 

Pinehurst is the only Resort in America from 
which Consumptives are absolutely excluded. 

Through Pullman Service via Seaboard Air Line or Southern Railway. Only one night out from New York, Boston and 
Cincinnati. An exquisite book with facsimiles of water-color sketches similar to the accompanying, illustrating the out- 
of-door features of Pinehurst, will be sent on application. 

Address Pinehurst General Offices 

PINEHURST, NORTH CAROLINA 

Or LEONARD TUFTS, Owner, Boston, Mass. 



RECREATION. 



Xlll 




St. Johns River Service between 

Jacksonville and Saaford, Fla., 

s 



The " Clyde Line " is the favorite route 
between New York, Boston, Phila- 
delphia and Eastern Points, and 
Charleston, S. C, and Jackson- 
ville, Fla., making direct connection 
for all points South and Southwest. 



FAST MODERN 

STEAMSHIPS AND 

SUPERIOR SERVICE 



Wm P. CLYDE £L Co .General Agents 

15 Si aie S t . New Yo RiL 



JC1V 






RECREATION. 



B TOina 



Ipiano 



is a joy in any household. You can get a strictly high- 
grade piano by writing us direct and can save$ioo 
to $200 on it. Sent on trial. We pay freight. Easy 
monthly payments. No money required in advance. 
In 36 years we have sold 33,000 pianos and refer to 
over 33,000 satisfied purchasers. Wing Pianos are 
guaranteed for 12 years. "Book of Information about 
Pianos" sent free on request. Mention Recreation. 

IfOHng & Son 

350 to 356 t!U. 13tb St. iRew Vork 



•^ 






RECREATION. 



xv 




m 






Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 

Laughlin 



FOUNTAIN 
PEN 

Guaranteed Finest 
Grade 14k. 

SOLID GOLD PEN. 

To test the merits of 

RECREATION 

as an advertising medium 
we offer your choice of 



IP 



These 
Two 
Popular 
Styles 
For Only 



$1.00 

M Postpaid 
y to any 

Address 1 



Hi: 



(By registered mail, 8c. extra) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large si^e 14k. gold pen, 
any flexibility desired— 
in feeding device perfect. 

Either Style— RICHLY 
GOLD riOUNTED for 

presentation purposes, 
$1.00 extra. 

Grand Special 
Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week ; if you do not find 
it as represented, fully 
as fine a value as you 
can secure for three times 
the price in any other 
make, if not entirely sat- 
isfactory in every respect, 
return it and we will send 
you $1.10 for it, the extra 
ioc. is for your trouble in 
writing us and to show our 
confidence in the Laughlin 
Pen — (Not one customer 
in 5,000 has asked for his 
money back.) 

Lay this RECREATION Down 
and Write NOW. 

Safety Pocket Pen Holder sent 
T^ free of charge with each Pen 

ADDRESS ; 

Laughlin flfg. Co. 

424 Griswold St., DETROIT, MICH. 




"BRISTOL" 

CALENDAR 

for 1905 

This beautiful calen- 
dar is lithographed in 
ten colors and will be 
much admired wher- 
ever seen, as it is full 
of interest for all who 
enjoy out-door sports. 

We will send this calendar to any 
address on receipt of ten cents (in 
silver) to cover cost of mailing. 

The Horton Mfg. Co. 

86 Horton St. 
Bristol, Conn. 



XVI 



RECREATION. 



*&A *&1S&. <&£% «&% *J>J£a «*f«a. •s"«=s> «s»«a. «s'«a. «j»ea. *»«% 



«4t <£%& 




* 



Far-famed Miami Valley 

Government statistics prove that the Miami Valley in Ohio produces 
better grain and has purer water than any other section of this country. It 
is Nature's garden. Right in the heart of this favored spot is our distill- 
ery. We have at our very door the two essentials for producing the finest 
whiskey in the world—the best grain and the purest water. Add to these 
one of the most completely equipped distilleries ever operated and an ex- 
perience of 37 years in distilling whiskey and you have a combination that 
is unequaled anywhere. That's why HAYNER WHISKEY is the best for medi- 
cinal and other uses. That's why we have nearly half a million satisfied 
customers. That's why YOU should try it. Don't forget that it goes L^ 
direct from our own distillery to you, with all its original strength, rich- j& 
ness and flavor, carries a UNITED STATES REGISTERED DISTILL- 
ER'S GUARANTEE of PURITY and AGE and saves the dealers' enor- 
mous profits. Your money back if you're not satisfied. 





* 



HAYNE 
WHIS 



** M 



FULL QUARTS 



EXPRESS CHARGES PAID BY US. 




We will send you FOUR FULL QUART BOTTLES of HAY- 
B NER'S SEVEN-YEAR-OLD RYE for $3.20, and we will pay 



0UR0FFER. h h T , d , d . ld 

the express charges. 1 ry it and it you don t find 
it all right and as good as you ever used or can buy from anybody else at any 
price, then send it back at our expense and your $3.20 will be returned to you by 
next mail. Just think that offer over. How could it be fairer? If you are not 
perfectly satisfied you are not out a cent. Better let us send you a trial order. 
If you don't want four quarts yourself, get a friend to join you. We ship in a 
plain sealed case, no marks to show what's inside. Write our nearest office NOW. 

Orders for Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho . Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, 
Utah, Washington or Wyoming must be on the basis of 4 Quarts for $4.00 by EXPRESS 
PREPAID or 20 Quarts for $16.00 by FRB1QHT PREPAID. 



ESTABLISHED 
1866. 



DISTILLERY, 
TROY, OHIO. 



* 



THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 

DAYTON, OHIO. ST LOUIS, MO. ST. PAUL, MINN. ATLANTA, GA. 



HAYNER'S 

SEVEN YEAR OLD 





HE SAW A BIG BEAR WITH A PIG IN ITS ARM. 



RECREATION. 



Volume XXII. JANUARY, 1905 Number i 

G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager 



A BLACK BEAR AND A WHITE SWEDE. 

FRANK MOSSMAN. 

The black bear of Washington is their dining room he saw a big bear, 

not particular what he eats as long as with a pig in its arm, climbing over 

it fills a want on the belt line. He loves the swill buffet. 

honey and will knock over a beehive The Swede was naturally wroth. As 

and fight off the bees with one paw he had no gun he took the first wea- 

while he helps himself to honey steaks pon handy, which happened to be a 

with the other. He likes salmon eggs, pitchfork, and made for the bear. The 

and when salmon ascend the small brute paid little attention to this as- 

streams to spawn, our friend is on sault until he got a jab in the solar 

hand to rob the nest, or rather the sal- plexus. Then he dropped the hog 

mon. He will catch a salmon, split and the fight was on. . They sparred 

her open, eat the eggs, and repeat the cautiously for an opening. Bruin 

play until he is eggs-hausted, or runs thought he saw one and made a swipe, 

out of material. but Olsen's face got in the way. Hon- 

He also loves pork, and will go to ors were even, with first blood for the 
the hog pen and gather a squealing bear. About that time the thought 
hog in his arms as a mother does her struck Olsen that he could fight better 
baby boy. Every time the hog yells if he was not in his Sunday clothes, 
the bear sits down and cuffs its bris- It must have struck the bear, too, for 
ties off. If the bear gets into the tim- with a right and left swing he re- 
ber with it, he sits on his haunches moved the Swede's glad togs. As the 
and cuffs the poor swine until it is fight then stood it was 2 to one on the 
converted into pork chops, spareribs bear and 2 to one against the bear. Ol- 
and other appetizing eatables. After sen backed around the ring, wearing 
eating a whole hog our friend does not only a look of agony and a pair of 
like hog meat for a day or 2. He straw colored whiskers, 
crawls into a thicket, looking as if he j wo , voun g ladies from a neighbor- 
would like to unload some of his stock m g ra nch, attracted to the scene by 
on his friends at a big discount. the noise looked into the pen, saw a 

A Swede farmer named Olsen dis- bi utl draped Swede playing peek-a- 

covered a bear with a hog m its arm boQ with a bear and kt QUt a few Ug 

and chasing another That bear be- & ^^ thektter tQ break for the 
lieved in going the whole hog or none. 

Olsen had been to a country dance, tall timber The Swede dusted for 

not getting home until about daylight, the house ; he was of a retiring, mod- 

As he neared his wickiup he heard his est disposition. The fight was off, but 

hogs yelling fire. He ran to the resi- Olsen will never again try to pitch- 

dence of the porkers, and as he entered fork a bear into the Great Beyond. 



^ : :: : :^ : : / " ! ■ '■■.. ;V " ^ :< . 





Geo.A.Kiri^ 



THE FATHER AND THE MOTHER WENT FOR THE LITTLE CHAP. 

4 



HOW A MEXICAN WAS TURNED BACK. 



ARIZONA RANGER. 



I met a poor boy yesterday who, in 
the course of our talk, told me he had 
read some copies of Recreation and 
that he hoped to be able some time 
to get enough money to take it a 
whole year. I gave him a dollar, told 
him to send it in, and you should 
have seen his eyes snap and the color 
come to his bronzed cheeks. He was 
prouder than any millionaire ever was 
of his newest yacht or his latest auto- 
mobile. The boy is, no doubt, enrolled 
on your subscription list by this time, 
and you will never have a more in- 
terested or a more enthusiastic reader 
in all your great family than this little 
chap will be. 

I am greatly interested in your 
Game Fields and your Gun and Am- 
munition Department, but most of all 
in your work for the suppression "of 
game butchers. I am a Forest Rang- 
er and am one of the men who do not 
believe in killing every living thing 
that comes in sight. In my rides 
across our Arizona plains, or through 
our mountains, I frequently see deer 
and antelope that I could easily kill, 
but they are always safe, except as to 
an occasional buck which I may need 
for meat ; and I kill such only in the 
open season. 

Some months ago, while riding from 
Wilcox to Fort Grant, I saw a Mexi- 
can coming toward me with his horse 
on a lope. As he approached I saw 
his ivories shining and he was ges- 
ticulating wildly. I knew he was 
greatly excited over something that 
had happened. On getting still nearer 
I saw hanging across his saddle in 
front of him a baby antelope that was 
pretty much all eyes and legs. The 
Mexican told me, between his bursts 
of laughter and his expletives, how he 
had roped it ; how he was going to 
carry it to town, where he hoped to 
be able to sell it for $2. 

I asked him if he knew he was vio- 



lating the law in capturing the animal 
and that he was subject to a fine of 
$200 or to imprisonment for 200 days ? 
He said no, and his broad grin 
changed to a serious frown in about 3 
seconds. I told him I was an officer 
and that it was my duty to place him 
under arrest and to take him to court, 
but that if he would turn back with 
me, find the parents of the little ante- 
lope and restore it to them I would 
allow him to go free. He was much 
more anxious to comply with these 
terms than he had been to get to town 
and sell the antelope. We rode about 
4 miles on his back trail and finally 
sighted a pair of antelope, a buck and 
a doe. I told the Mexican to hold the 
kid up above his head. He did so, and 
it gazed about over the prairie. Final- 
ly it sighted the old folks and set up a 
most eager bleating. The parents 
heard this, and came toward us on a 
keen jump. They, did not stop run- 
ning until within 100 yards of us. 
Then they circled half way around us 
and stopped. 

My horse did not like this visitation 
and went to pitching in a way that 
kept me mighty busy for the next few 
minutes. I finally got him cooled off 
and told the Mexican to let the kid 
gently down to the ground. He did 
so and it made a beeline for its moth- 
er. Then there was another beautiful 
sight. It was pathetic to see how both 
the father and the mother went for 
the little chap, nosed him, licked him 
and pushed him about. They seemed 
entirely unconscious of our presence, 
and, after watching them until they 
had apparently recovered from their 
fit of ecstasy, we rode away and left 
them. I told the Mexican to tell all 
his people of this experience, and he 
promised faithfully to do so. I have 
since told the story many times to 
white people, Indians and Mexicans, 
and now there is not a man or a worn- 




THE HEAD OF THE FAMILY 
6 



HE LOVED THE WOODS. 



an in this whole country who is not in- 
terested in watching and hearing from 
that family of antelope. I do not be- 
lieve there is a man in Arizona who 
would dare kill one of them. If any 
man should do so, and any of the 
ranchmen or Mexicans should catch 
him in the act, his hide would leak 
daylight in less than a minute. 

We have a law in this State making 
a close season on antelope for 10 years, 



and it was enacted through the direct 
efforts of the League of American 
Sportsmen. Of course, the Mexican 
who roped the little antelope did not 
know this, but he knows it nov/, and 
all the other Mexicans in the country 
know it. I have always done and al- 
ways shall do everything in my power 
to protect all wild animals and birds 
from thoughtless and reckless slaugh- 
ter. 



HE LOVED THE WOODS. 

STACY E. BAKER. 

He loved the woods, and almost ev'ry day Folks called him "Nature's fool," and loved 

Would find him strolling there, heart-free to play 

and gay, Their jokes an' tricks on him ; an' then he'd 

Through shady bowers. Each leaf an' stay 

tree * Down where the forest brook runs wild 

Seemed mos' to know him ; seemed as if an' free ; 



he 



He loved the woods. 



Was kith an' kin to birds, an' such as they. 



Sometimes he'd be for weeks an' days away, 

An' folks as didn't understand would say, 

"Jim's got another broodin' spell" ; but 

we — 
The buds an' flowers, ferns an' things 
an' me — 
We knew ; we knew what led his steps 
astray : 
He loved the woods. 



A young graduate in law, who had had 
some experience in New York City, wrote 
to a prominent practitioner in Arkansas to 
inquire what chance there was in that sec- 
tion for such a one as he described himself 
to be. He said : "I am a Republican in pol- 
itics, and an honest young lawyer." The 
reply that came seemed encouraging : "If 
you are a Republican the game laws here 
will protect vou. and if you are an honest 
lawyer you will have no competition." — Ar- 
gonaut. 



ON TOP OF MOUNT SHASTA. 



A. L. A. HIMMELWRIGHT 
Photos by the Author. 



The opportunity to climb a high moun- 
tain peak came to me during a recent 
visit to the Pacific coast. En route to 
San Francisco I crossed the Siskiyou 
mountains, and as we emerged from the 
tunnel I had my first view of Mount 
Shasta, 80 miles distant, cold, forbidding, 
defiant, standing out boldly against the 
Southern sky. The descent of the train 
from the Siskiyou range, by numerous 
loops and turns, and until the foothills of 
Mount Shasta are reached, requires 3 hours. 
During that time Shasta is always in sight, 
sometimes on one side of the train and 
sometimes on the other, as the railroad 



region East of it is underlaid with lava 
for a distance of 100 miles. Shasta has 
5 glaciers : 2 on the North, 2 on the East, 
and one on the South. The Black Buttes, 
a twin peak 1,000 feet high, in the mid- 
dle of Strawberry valley and 6 miles dis- 
tant from Mount Shasta, once formed the 
summit of the mountain and one side of 
its crater. The buttes are composed largely 
of cinders and have 5 distinct crater cups. 
The forests about the foothills of Mount 
Shasta have been considerably disfigured 
by lumbermen, but otherwise the entire 
region about the mountain is as nature 
made it. 




CLIFFS, GLACIER AND CREVASSES EASTWARD OF THUMB ROCK. 



winds about the mountains. Similarly, 
several hours are consumed in travel in the 
opposite direction before the mountain is 
lost to sight. 

Mount Shasta is the extreme Northern 
end of the Sierra Nevada range, and is 
near the Northern boundary of Califor- 
nia. It is a huge, isolated peak, towering 
11,000 feet above the surrounding country 
and reaching an altitude of 14,380 feet 
above sea-level. It has one secondary or 
lower peak on the West side, and dozens 
of ragged spurs branching from it in all 
directions. It is oblong in shape, being 
about 15 miles wide and 30 miles long, or 
approximately 90 miles around its base. _ 

Shasta is extremely interesting, geologi- 
cally. It is an extinct volcano, and the 



About 16 miles Southwest is Shasta 
Springs, now a popular summer resort, the 
water of the springs having valuable medi- 
cinal properties. Sisson, McCloud, Mount 
Shasta Camp, Upper Soda Springs, and 
Dunsmuir, are villages in the v ; cinity of 
Mount Shasta that also accommodate sum- 
mer tourists. Sisson, the largest of these, 
is the place from which parties usually 
start to climb the mountain. The best 
season for the ascent is August and Sep- 
tember. I arrived at Sisson _ August 24th. 

After canvassing the situation thorough- 
ly as to guides, I decided on H. L. Em- 
mons. He accompanied me to my hotel, 
inspected my clothing, etc., and_ personally 
superintended the correct placing of the 
lumbermen's spikes in my shoes. We 




GLACIER, CREVASSES AND PEAKS NORTHWARD FROM THUMB ROCK. 



adopted the usual schedule in climbing 
the Southern face of the mountain : to the 
timber line by trail, on horseback, the after- 
noon of the first day; on foot to the sum- 
mit of the mountain, and returning to camp 
the second day ; camping the second night, 
and returning to Sisson the morning of the 
third day. 

We left Sisson at 3.30 p. m., carrying our 
blankets, food and duffle with us on the 
saddle-horses. The journey of 8 miles to 
Horse Camp (elevation 8,000 feet), near 
the timber line, was over an easy trail 
through timber and occasional patches of 
thick underbrush. After caring for the 
horses, we prepared supper, and at 8 o'clock 
we were rolled up in our blankets trying 
to go to sleep. Emmons carried an alarm 
watch which he set for 3 o'clock. The in- 
stant it went off we were up and bustling 
around to get an early start. The horses 
were watered and tethered at a fresh place, 
breakfast was disposed of, and, just at 
dawn, we were ready for the long pull 
up the mountain. Before starting, Em- 
mons took from a bag, which had wonder- 
ful resources, a large bottle of vaselene 
and began applying it generously over his 
face, neck, ears and hands. 

"What are you doing that for?" I asked. 

"To prevent sunburning," he said. "If 
you do as I do, I'll guarantee you'll not 
get sunburnt." 

I followed his example, with little en- 
thusiasm, but the vaselene was only the 
priming coat. From the all-sufficient bag 
next came a small, white sack filled with 
corks. These Errfrnonj? emptied into the 
glowing coals of the camp fire, stirring them 
around until they were well burned on the 
outside. Scratching them out of the fire, 
he took a handful, as soon as they had 



cooled sufficiently, rubbed the black off the 
corks on his hands, and then applied it to 
his face, ears, neck, etc., over the vaselene. 
It was heroic treatment, but I soon was as 
black as the proverbial ace of spades. For 
10 or 15 minutes I felt as if I had been 
dipped with a bowl of molasses, but after 
that the "mussy" feeling wore away, some- 
what ,and I felt less uncomfortable. 

This treatment for sunburning, on in- 
vestigation, was found to be scientifically 
correct. Sunburning results when the skin 
is exposed to brighter light than that to 
which it is^ accustomed. The application 
of vaselene fills the pores of the skin and, 
by preventing the charcoal from getting 
into them, facilitates the removal and 
cleansing process, later. The blacking, by 
excluding the light, protects the skin per- 
fectly. 

My costume consisted of a close knit 
blue woolen shirt, tweed trousers, wool un-' 
derclothing, 2 pairs heavy wool socks, 
heavy, broad soled shoes with spikes, light, 
pliable leather leo-eings, a soft felt hat, 
with 2.V2 inch brim, woolen mittens, and 
smoked glass goggles. I carried an alpen- 
stock, a 5x7 Premo camera, an aneroid 
barometer, and sandwiches. Emmons pro- 
tested against the camera, and was positive 
I would never reach the top if I insisted 
on carrying it ; but I wanted the photo- 
graphs, and decided to take it with me. 

We started up the gulch in which Horse 
Camp is located, walking on loose rock for 
over half a mile. The sides of the gulch 
are 2 lines of ragged cliffs, the West side 
having precipitous faces. At 9,000 feet we 
found snow in the bottom of the gulch. 
This was hard, from frequent freezing and 
thawing, and made much more comfortable 
footing than the loose rock. As we con- 



ON TOP OF MOUNT SHASTA. 



ii 



tinued upward, the slope became rapidly 
steeper until at 11,000 feet it was slow and 
tedious work, and we were climbing rather 
than walking. At some places one could 
stand erect, turn a shoulder toward the 
mountain and touch the sloping snow 
with outstretched hand. The value of the 
spikes in our shoes, under such conditions, 
can be appreciated. Two hours of this 
work took us to the foot of the Mitten, an 
island of loose black rock, surrounded by 
snow, and having a shape which gave it 
its name. It is about one-half mile long, 
and is at the head of the gulch we as- 
cended. The Mitten and Thumb Rock, at 
its upper end, are well known landmarks, 
and are visible from Sisson and many miles 
farther to the Southward. 

It was just noon when we arrived at the 
foot of the Mitten, 11,800 feet. The heat 
of the sun was thawing the snow and 
loosening boulders, which occasionally went 
smashing down the canyon, raising clouds 
of snow and dust as they touched the sur- 
face. Emmons explained that was why it 
was necessary to start early and reach as 
high an altitude as possible before the sun 
got warm. The reflection of the sun on the 
snow produced a glare so intense that with- 
out goggles our eyes could have been kept 
open but a small fraction of the time, and 
would then probably have been seriously 
injured. 



After exposing a few photographic plates 
and taking a short rest we continued our 
ascent. The altitude began to be noticeable 
and my breathing became labored. Emmons 
chose the narrow strip of snow to the right 
of the Mitten, but it was so steep and the 
climbing so difficult that I thought I would 
try the rocky slope farther to the right. 
This proved to be small, loose rock just at 
the angle of repose. My weight caused my 
feet to sink into this material above my 
ankles, and I slid down hill with the rock 
about as fast as I could move upward. 
Sometimes several square yards of the sur- 
face would start and carry me down 5 to 
10 feet before it would stop. The harness 
I used to carry the camera impeded the ac- 
tion of my lungs, and the camera seemed 
to weigh 100 pounds. I was obliged to 
rest frequently. The sun's rays on the 
rocks were much hotter than on the snow. 
My progress was extremely slow, and final- 
ly, convinced that I had made a mistake in 
leaving the snow strip, I returned to it. 
Emmons had by that time climbed to a 
point several hundred feet above me, and 
when I reached him he generously offered 
to help carry the camera, but I would not 
consent. It was 2 o'clock when we reached 
Thumb Rock, on the crest of the mountain 
and at an elevation of 13,000 feet. The 
summit, i J / 2 miles West, was plainly visible 
from that point, and the scenery in all di- 



^jyiC 










RED ROCK NORTHWEST OF THE MITTEN. 



12 



RECREATION. 



rections was exceptionally interesting and 
beautiful. To the East and North stretch 
immense snow fields, or glaciers, cut by crev- 
asses and punctured here and there by 
sharp, rocky peaks. A mile to the East is 
a small lake of blue water surrounded by 
snow. To the South for several miles 
stretch the ragged, undulating crests of the 
2 spurs that bound the gulch we ascended ; 
and far beyond is Sisson, just visible 
through the smoke of forest fires. We did 
not see anything animate above the line of 
perpetual snow, about 10,000 feet, except 
common flies and butterflies. All day we 
observed hundreds of butterflies, principally 
the common small yellow variety, fluttering 
aimlessly and helplessly upward, only to be- 
come the victims of frost and snow as soon 
as the sun went down. 

We spent an hour photographing, ate our 
lunch and then resumed our journey toward 
the summit. On account of unusual thaw- 
ing of the snow we were obliged to change 
the route ordinarily taken and scale some 
steep, rocky slopes near Thumb Rock, but 
after surmounting them the route lay over 
an easy slope of snow and around to the 
South side of a spur jutting out from the 
summit. We continued our ascent on the 
crest of this spur. The footing was in 
snow and loose rock successively and was 
extremely fatiguing. After every 30 or 40 
steps our hearts beat like sledge hammers, 
but after a rest of a few seconds we could 
proceed again. Whenever we stopped we 
could hear boulders rolling and crashing 
down the mountain. Finally we reached 
the little plateau on top of the mountain, 
and there remained to climb only the tower- 
like pile of rocks, about 80 feet in diameter 
and 60 feet high, which constitutes tht 
summit. 

Emmons seated himself on a convenient 
rock at that point and directed my ascent 
verbally. In a few minutes I had gained 
the top and stood by the side of the cylin- 
drical steel monument placed there by the 
U. S. Government to mark the summit. 
After 11 hours of hard work since leaving 
camp that morning my feeling of satisfac- 
tion, of victory, at that moment can readily 
be imagined. 

The surroundings were most inspiring. 



Nowhere within the range of vision was 
there another eminence to rival Shasta or 
detract from its grandeur and glory. To the 
Westward my eyes in one tremendous 
sweep spanned the valley between Shasta 
and the Coast range ; and through gaps in 
the latter, here and there, I could discern 
patches of the blue waters of the Pacific 
ocean. The valleys of the Klamatte, Pitt 
and Sacramento rivers are in plain sight. 
Vast forests carpet the surface far and near, 
enveloping even the foothills of Shasta ; but 
nearer at hand there is naught but rock and 
snow — the black and white that are found 
only above the timber line. 

There was little opportunity to enjoy and 
appreciate Nature's wonderful panorama 
from that point of vantage. Much time had 
been consumed in photographing, and it was 
necessary to hurry back toward camp as 
fast as possible before darkness should 
overtake us. I hastily pocketed a handful 
of small stones for souvenirs ; registered 
my name in the book that is kept for the 
purpose in a small, sheet-iron box near the 
monument, and taking a last look in all 
directions, began the descent. It was just 
10 minutes past 6. On reaching Emmons 
he took me a short distance Westward to a 
hot spring which emitted strong sulphurous 
fumes. We then began a rapid descent 
over the snow by a different route. The 
slopes were sufficiently steep so that in a 
sitting position we could slide, feet first, 
distances of over T 4 of a mile. I used my 
alpenstock under my right arm to steer, 
and by forcing il into the snow in the 
steepest places it served effectively as a 
brake. Emmons is an expert at this method 
of rapid transit, and frequently made light- 
ning express speed with a cloud of snow in 
his wake. I was more "timid and made 
slower time, but enjoyed the experience 
thoroughly and had no mishap. 

By 7 o'clock we had descended 4,000 feet, 
and at 9 o'clock we were at camp. Much to 
our chagrin one of the horses had broken 
loose and gone home. We watered the re- 
maining horse, prepared and ate a big sup- 
per and slept as only tired men can sleep. 
The next morning after breakfast we packed 
all our duffle on the remaining horse and 
walked back to Sisson. 



• 



"Isn't that Russian naval officer over- 
whelmed with grief after damaging one of 
his own ships?" 

"No. He is proud because the Japanese 
didn't do it."— Washington Star. 



AFTER MOOSE IN ONTARIO. 



D. R. TUCKER. 



Some years ago, with a friend and his 
wife, I left New York in September for a 
trip to Northern Ontario and Quebec. At 
Bai des" Peres, a Hudson bay post, we out- 
fitted with grub, canoes and 2 guides, both 
Indians, for a fishing trip on the many ad- 
joining lakes and streams. 

Black bass were abundant at each camp- 
ing place. We had the Indians build fish 
ponds, in which we put our daily catch, 
killing only enough for our immediate use. 
On leaving camp we liberated our captives. 
I caught fish on a bass rod until I was tired 
of the sport, then commenced on them 
with a 4,1-2 ounce fly rod, prolonging the 
struggle and thus keeping down our dailv 
average. The lady of our party caught our 
only lake trout, an 18 pounder, of which 
she was exceedingly proud. 

After wandering up and down rapid 
streams, portaging to beautiful lakes seem- 
ingly numberless, having many little ad- 
ventures and incidentally a glorious time, 
we found our way back to Lake Tamis- 
caming, where my friends took the boat 
for home. 

I went on to the head of the lake and 
outfitted at a store there for a trip up the 
Blanche river after moose, Toussaint, a 
noted Italian trapper and hunter, going 
with me. Three days' hard paddling and 
portaging took us to our hunting grounds. 
About 75 years ago the whole country 
along this stream was burnt over. No 
new timber has grown up, but a thick 
brush now covers the ground, making an 
excellent moose country. On the way up, 
while paddling around a sharp turn in the 
stream, we almost ran into 2 yearling cows, 
but, of course, did not shoot. After look- 
ing at us a few seconds, they trotted off in 
the shallow water, then bounded over the 
bank and away. 

Arrived at our destination, 2 long, nar- 
row lakes, connected by a short, reedy 
stream, we pitched camp. Thence we went 
on foot to a large barren, where Toussaint 
expected to see moose. Luck was not with 
us, and we returned to camp. Next morn- 
ing we saw a cow and a calf, paddled up 
within 50 yards and watched them trot 
away. After lunch we went to the upper 
lake. While watching for moose, I put out 
my troll, soon hooking a large oike. The 
fish gave my trout rod: about all it could 
stand. In the middle of the fun a bull 
caribou crossed the narrow outlet, about 
200 yards away, but was out of sight be- 
fore I could get the rifle. The pjike 
weighed 17 pounds. 

Next 'day we saw only a cow moose. At 
night Toussaint suggested that we should 
go to a wonderful spring lake, where he 



was sure we would see a bull. Early in the 
morning we crossed the lake, leaving our 
canoe, but taking grub, blankets and rifle, 
walked 2 miles to a little lake, where the 
Indian found a small canoe. We loaded 
up and got in, to find that our frail craft 
was only about 2 inches out of the water. 
Paddling carefully out of the lake down 
one stream and up another, we came 
to a small stream of clear water, which 
the Indian said came from Spring lake. 
Proceeding up it with great care, for 
it was narrow and shallow, about , half a 
mile, we made camp. After eating launch 
we took the canoe and rifle and paddled 
on to the springs about 1-3 mile. 

On the way up Toussaint stopped pad- 
dling, softly whispering, "Bear," and point- 
ed to a spot in the brush not 20 yards away. 
I made out something black, which proved 
to be Bruin's head. I pressed the trigger 
and the bear was ours. He had been feed- 
ing on a yearling moose, which, the Indian 
said, he had killed. After skinning the bear 
and taking some meat, we went on to the 
lake, a short distance away. It was a 
small sheet of water, not more than 5 or 6 
acres in extent, situated in a lovely dell, 
surrounded by low hills. No stream runs 
into it, but it is fed by 14 large springs, 
boiling up from craterlike depressions in 
the white sand, which covers the whole 
bottom of the lake. The water was so 
pure and clear that it could hardly be seen 
and, although the lake is 30 or 40 feet 
deep, a pin could have been distinguished 
on the bottom. The canoe seemed floating 
in air and several times I dipped my hands 
in the water to assure myself that we 
were not suspended by some enchantment. 

As the light began to fade we reluctantly 
headed for camp. Just before reaching it 
a big bull moose loomed up in the dusk. 
One quick shot finished him. We left him 
where he fell until morning, when we 
skinned him and took his head. By work- 
ing hard all day and making 2 trips, we 
got back to our permanent camp, leaving 
skins and head over night at the lake 
where we got the small canoe. 

During the next 2 days we saw several 
cows and on the 3d day killed another 
bull with a large head, after an exciting 
chase. Then we said goodbye to our hunt- 
ing grounds and headed "for" the Ottawa. 
Two days of easy paddling, but some hard 
portaging, down the rapid stream, took us 
safely back. On our way down we saw 
where many moose had crossed since we 
went uo. A few days of rest at the head 
of the lake and I paddled down to Bai des 
Peres, where the steamboat was caught for 
civilization again. 



13 




DO NOT HIT THIS BUSH TOO HARD. 



M 



AN IDEAL GAME PRESERVE. 



G. 0. SHIELDS. 



For the busy New York man who likes 
to get a day's shooting occasionally, with- 
out taking too much time from business, 
there is no place like the Chamberlin pre- 
serve at Old Point Comfort, Va. Real- 
izing the wants of this large class, the 
manager of the Hotel Chamberlin has 
leased the shooting rights on a number of 
farms and on several large tracts of un- 
cultivated lands in James City county, 
for the exclusive use of his guests. The 



abundant here ever since the country was 
discovered. With a view to keeping up the 
supply and improving the stock ioo pairs 
of quails were imported from North Caro- 
lina last fall and liberated on the preserve. 
It is the intention of the manager to re- 
peat this operation every year and thus to 
keep an abundance of the little brownies 
on hand for years to come. 

There are several flocks of wild turkeys 
on the preserve. They keep back in the 






THE HUNTING LODGE ON THE BANKS OF THE CHICKAHOMINY. 



tract thus controlled is about 7 miles long 
and one to 2 miles wide. It is carefully 
patrolled by gamekeepers, and no one is 
allowed to shoot on the premises without a 
written permit from the manager of the 
hotel. 

The preserve is reached by a ride of 47 
miles on the C. & O. railway to Toano. 
The preserve borders on the station 
grounds and the visitor may begin shooting 
as soon as he leaves the village. 

This Is a natural game country, and quail, 
turkeys, deer, ducks and rails have been 



neavy timber and are difficult to find, but 
the patient, skillful hunter may reasonably 
count on getting a few of these kingly birds 
if he can spare 2 or 3 days in which to 
hunt them. 

Woodcock are fairly plentiful about the 
numerous marshes, and ducks, snipe and 
plover are abundant there in season. 

One of the most attractive birds to be 
found in that country, however, is the sora. 
The preserve includes about 500 acres of 
tide marsh bordering on the Chickahominy 
river, which is a natural resort of the 



is 




A GLIMPSE OF THE MARSH NEAR THE LODGE. 



savory little birds. When the first frosts 
fall in Maine and Canada the sora go South 
and drop into the Virginia and Carolina 
marshes in great numbers. The manager 



detail, and I have asked Mr. Adams to 
make a rule limiting the number of sora 
which any man may hereafter kill in a 
day to 25, or 50 at the outside. I am cer- 




OLD DOMINION RAPID TRANSIT. 



of the Chamberlin preserve has an ample 
supply of boats at his hunting lodge, and 
good men to push them and retrieve the 
game. Numerous killings have been made 
there which I should not care to report in 



tain he will do this in the interests of clean 
sport and for the good of his guests. 

The number of quails to each gun should 
be limited to 15 a day. 

The sora usually come in about Septem- 



16 



AN IDEAL GAME PRESERVE. 



17 




THE MANAGER AND NELLIE. 

ber first, and when Jack Frost begins busi- 
ness in Virginia, usually about October 15th 
to 30th, the birds move on down the coast ; 
so the patrons of the Chamberlin preserve 
may safely count on good rail shooting at 
any time between September first and Oc- 
tober 15th. 

Mr. Adams has built an ideal log cabin 



fMWWtwm 




WAITING FOR THE BUCKS TO COME IN. 

on a high bluff overlooking the marsh and 
a long stretch of the Chickahominy river. 
This lodge is furnished with good beds, 
plenty of easy chairs and a complete cook- 
ing outfit. The pantry is kept stocked with 
good, wholesome food. 

The sportsman who plans a day on the 



preserve may leave the big hotel at 9.40 in 
the morning, lunch at the hunting lodge and 
spend the afternoon in search of quails, 
sora, wild turkeys, woodcock, snipe or 
ducks, according to the season or his taste. 
He can then board a train at Toano at 5 
o'clock and be at the Chamberlin in time 
for dinner. Or, if he choose, he may stay 
at the hunting lodge during the entire term 
of his vacation, and be all the better for 
it, for the woods there are full of ozone. 
Mr. Adams has provided a large ken- 
nel for the use of his guests, which usually 
contains about 20 dogs. I shot over one 
of these, an English setter named Nell, 
and she is one of the best trained dogs and 
one of the most beautiful workers I have 





ON THE WAY TO THE LODGE. 

ever seen in the field. There are many 
others in the kennel equally good. 

Mr. A. Croonenberghs, the manager of 
the preserve* is a Belgian and had a wide 
experience as a game breeder on his 
father's estate in the old country. Later 
he followed mining and ranching in Colo- 
rado and has traveled extensively in other 
parts of the world. He is an exceedingly 
interesting man to talk with and is always 
on the alert to entertain his visitors and to 
promote their comfort in every way 
possible. 

The sport on the Chamberlin preserve 
may be varied by spending a part of the 
night in hunting coons >or 'possums. Both 
animals are plentiful there and a bunch of 
beagles, fox hounds and fox terriers make 
mighty interesting music when they go on 
a trail. 

Mallards, teal, blackheads, redheads and 
occasionally canvasbacks frequent the marsh 
in goodly numbers, and if a man does not 
get such shooting as he wants there he can 



i8 



RECREATION. 



take a flat bottom boat, cover it with grass, 
float down the Chickahominy and get good 
shooting on these and other varieties of 
ducks. 

Guides wages are only $1.50 a day; guide 
and dog, $2; boatman and boat, $1.50; team 
and driver, $2 a day. 

Sportsmen who prefer to use their own 
dogs can have them boarded permanently 
at Mr. Adams' kennel at $5 a month. 

My own experience on the Chamberlin 
preserve was extremely interesting. In 4 
hours' hunting we put up 3 full coveys 
of 15 to 20 birds each, and by following 
them persistently could easily have killed 
15 or 20, but we felt we had enough when 
we got 5 quails and one woodcock, so we 
quit. 

The next day we had an old fashioned 
rain. In the afternoon the tempera- 
ture neared the freezing point and snow 
came down in large wet chunks. Sheltered 
by rubber boots and a Pantasote coat and 
hat I walked from the lodge to the station, 
2,y 2 miles. Persimmons were just ripe and 
the trees were loaded. To pick the luscious 
fruit from the snow-covered ground and 
eat all I wanted of it, as I trudged along 
through a errand old storm, was a treat not 
often afforded a Northern man. A dinner 
at the Hotel Chamberlin, made memorable 
by a broiled woodcock on toast, was a fit- 
ting close to an ideal day in the Old Do- 
minion. 

Most people know what a delightful place 



Old Point Comfort is in winter, and what 
a luxurious house the Hotel Chamberlin 
is.' Those who have not had the pleasure 
of visiting this famous resort have some- 
thing interesting to look forward to. There 
are few resorts in this country where a man 
can get so much for his money as at Old 
Point. 

Fortress Monroe, one of the best of our 
seacoast defenses, is located there, and 
within its historic walls the United States 
Artillery School is conducted. This keeps 
a large number of officers, young and old. 
on duty there, and the corridors, parlors, 
dining rooms and ballroom of the Cham- 
berlin are aglow with blue and gold day 
and night. 

Immediately in front of the Hotel Cham- 
berlin, and only 3 miles away, the great 
battle between the Merrimac and the Moni- 
tor was fought ; Cornwallis surrendered to 
Washington at Yorktown, only a few miles 
from Old Point, and the war of 1812 left 
its imprint on this hallowed ground. The 
greatest ship-building plant in America and 
the largest dry dock in the world are at 
Newport News, 12 miles away. 

It is well worth while for every Amer- 
ican to make at least one trip to Old Point 
and look over these historic landmarks. If 
you go in the open season for any of the 
kinds of game I have mentioned, you can 
take your gun along and put in a day or 2 
where conditions are right for good 
sport. 



CONTRASTS. 



C. O. WOODMANSEE. 



The meadow where last summer 

The daisies used to blow, 
Is covered now with glist'ning ice 

And the sifting, drifting snow. 

The forests where last summer 

The robins used to sing, 
Now bow their bald, submissive heads 

To the mighty Winter King. 

The brook that down the valley, 
Last summer used to race, 

Is silent now and still 
In Winter's cold embrace. 



The pond where all last summer 

The froglets used to play, 
Is covered now with cold, thick ice 

Where the skeeters have gone away. 

The breezes that last summer 

So soft were wont to blow, 
Have turned around, are coming back, 

Their whiskers full of snow. 

Oh, Winter, we are tired of you, 
We wish you soon would go ; 

We're tired of your blooming blizzards, 
We're tired of your ulster of snow. 



But don't feel badly, Winter, 
When the dog days come again; 

We'll sigh for your cooling breezes 
In this same poetic strain. 



A REMINISCENCE OF THE OLD DOMINION. 



R. G. KINNIER. 



In the early 70's and later there were 
plenty of deer on the Rich Patch moun- 
tains, in Virginia ; to-day there are none. 

What boy in his early teens has not 
thrilled with feverish excitement in antici- 
pation of a deer hunt? Who of us in later 
years is so engrossed with the cares of the 
great workaday world that we do not turn 
aside occasionally from more serious pur- 
suits to contemplate dreamily all the cir- 
cumstances of that hunt in minutest de- 
tail? 

A deer hunt in those days was usually 
arranged Sunday, at the old Locust Bottom 
church. The country was sparsely settled 
and means of communication were meager, 
so it was the custom for the farmers of the. 
neighborhood, while waiting for the parson, 
to line up on a rail fence hard by the church, 
like so many crows, exchange news, discuss 
the crop prospects, and when a deer hunt 
was on the tapis to locate the standers and 
appoint the driver. 

The James, receiving the confluent waters 
of the Jackson and Cowpasture rivers, which 
form its source, flows 6 miles through the 
farm lands, then swerves around toward 
the base of the mountain, which it hugs 
for 2 miles cr more, forming in its wide 
sweep an immense horseshoe. The inter- 
vening land between the 2 sides of the shoe 
was covered by dense forest, except where 
at the toe of the shoe and contiguous to 
the river the wooded district had been re- 
claimed and given over to agriculture. 
Along this stretch the stands were located, 
each with its name taken from some pecu- 
liar feature or point in the surroundings, 
as, "the foot of the island," "the big rock," 
"the old log," "the Engart house" and so 
on. The forest land was called "the Bent,' 
taking its name from the bend in the river, 
and was a favorite rendezvous for the deer ; 
indeed it might more properly be called 
their sanctuary ; for should a deer luckilv 
escape with his life while passing through 
the stands, the dogs were invariably called 
off at the river and the pursuit ended. He 
repaired thence to the Bent for rest, and 
returned to his haunts on the mountain at 
his leisure. 

There was little still hunting in those 
days. It was accounted too slow and de- 
void of the excitement which made the 
chase the favorite mode of hunting, though 
occasionally a deer was killed at one of 
the several licks in the mountain which 
they were in the habit of frequenting. 
These were usually artificial, a large lump 
of rock salt irnl?ed4e4 securely in a log, 



19 



or better still, the natural springs of sul- 
phur water of which the deer were espe- 
cially fond. The gunner repaired to the 
lick about dusk, hid near, and awaited the 
coming of his quarry. The darkness and 
stillness of the forest, broken only by the 
wavering cry of the screech owl, the to- 
hoo-hoo-hoo of his larger kinsman, the 
barking of a fox, or the soughing of the 
winds through the tree tops, are not con- 
ducive to cheer the ordinary mortal, but for 
one who loves the woods and nature their 
manifold voices possess an enduring charm. 
Sometimes the deer came; oftener he did 
not come ; but whether he came or not the 
experience was unique and interesting. 

Hunting with dogs, now wisely prohib- 
ited in most of the States, was then the 
method in vogue. Hal was usually called 
on to drive, because of his remarkable 
woodcraft and his knowledge of the coun- 
try. If Hal Wood could not get up a deer 
nobody could. His famous hound, Ring- 
wood, was possessed of an instinct as re- 
markable as his master's woodcraft. Ring- 
wood could take up a cold trail, which few 
dogs could touch, and stick to the trail 
until the deer was jumped. Rock and Ro- 
ver, his running mates, were good hounds, 
more fleet of foot than their old compan- 
ion ; and with his wonderful keenness of 
scent they made a trio hard to beat. Ring- 
wood's yelp while on the trail or in the 
chase was a study in acoustics. His open 
was a deep bass followed by a high, vibrant 
note, which reverberated through the moun- 
tain and floated trumpetlike over the val- 
ley below. It had for me more fascination 
than the choicest symphony. 

One night it was arranged that Hal should 
have the dogs on the mountain by daylight. 
He was to start in at the White Rock gap 
and whip around toward the Mine branch. 
Covering that portion of the mountain with 
the 3 faithful hounds resulted usually in a 
deer being jumped early in the forenoon. 
The gunners on the stands below could hear 
the chase from start to finish and were on 
the qui vive from the first note of old Ring- 
wood as the trail was struck, mingled with 
an occasional sharp yelp from Rock or Ro- 
ver, until they broke out in concert and we 
knew the chase was on. How inspiring! 
How thrilling! I envy not the man his 
apathy who under such circumstances could 
remain unmoved. Certainly it was not to be 
expected of a lad of 14 on his first deer 
hunt. Chills chased up and down my spine 
and my heart climbed into my throat. I 
am afraj'c], in spjt£ of Jial's acjrnQnitiorij I 



20 



RECREATION. 



was getting buck ague badly. He had given 
me a tip to this effect : 

"Ole Stiffleg's goin' to make a beeline for 
the ole log this mornin'. I know where 
he's foragin' ; and if I start him 'twixt the 
head of Mine branch hollow and the plant- 
bed he'll take the top of the ridge and is 
cocksure to take to water e'en about the ole 
log. If I jump him higher up he may come 
in at the foot of the island, or the big rock. 
Possibly he may whip around and go to 
the ole Engart house, but it's dollars to 
doughnuts if you cover the ole log you'll 
get a crack at him ; an' look here, boy, 
lemme tell you sumpin. I don't want you 
to get no buck ague ! Keep a stiff upper 
lip an' a tight toe-nail. Blaze away at his 
head first, just when he takes to water. 
You may hit him swimmin' ; and if you miss 
save your other barrel an' give him a sock- 
dolager when he reaches shallow water on 
t'other side. When you see him hoist his 
flag, look out ; he's mighty good on the 
jump, and will be off in the brush fo' you 
c'n say, 'Jack Robinson !' " 

I had been at the stand nearly 3 hours. 
There seemed to be nothing doing and time 
was hanging heavy. 



Presently from a high knob in the rear 
came a vociferous outburst from the dogs, 
and Lknew the deer was heading my way. 
At the same time I could hear his long, 
plunging leaps through the brush as he 
came down the mountain side. A moment's 
hush, then a loud splashing sound in the 
water, and there was the deer, somewhat 
jaded by the long chase, making for the 
opposite bank. And there stood a boy, half 
crazed with fright, with a gun wobbling 
every way and his heart beating fiercely 
under his waistcoat. It was hard to tell 
which was the more frightened, the deer or 
the boy. It seemed an age, but finally the 
gun spoke, and, Heaven only knows how it 
happened, but when the smoke cleared away 
the fatally wounded deer was seen churn- 
ing the water, crimson with his blood, in a 
last death struggle. 

I skinned out of my clothes in a jiffy, 
swam in and pulled my victim ashore, and 
when Hal arrived a few minutes later, I 
had the deer's throat cut. 

Hal was delighted at my good luck, and 
said, giving me his hand: 

''You're all right, Rob ! This ole county 
ain' big enough for you to-day." 



PICKED UP ON THE PLAINS. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY M. S. GARRETSON 



A UNIQUE RELIC OF A DEPARTING RACE, 



I am an ardent reader of your magazine ; 
also an amateur photographer. I have 
what I think is an interesting relic. The 
work and the idea are wholly my own. 
Thinking it might also interest some of 
your many readers I have photographed it, 
and send herewith a print. These are buf-' 
falo bull horns, in the rough, just as they 
were picked up on the plains, near Miles 
City, Montana, in 1882. The one on the 
right is, according to good authority, from 
an animal about 20 years old. The one on 
the left is about 30 years old. It shows how 
the old fellow had worn it off to keep it 
sharp. The skin covering the shield was 
once a part of a magnificent buffalo robe, 
beautifully decorated and Indian tanned. It 
was traded at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, 
by the Indians in 1849. A neighbor of mine 
came into possession of it that same year 
and has owned it ever since until recently, 
when at my earnest request he gave me the 
last remnant, to cover the shield and make 
the fringe decoration on what I call a 
Unique relic of a departing race. 

"Martin 5. Garretson, Franklin Park, N. J. 



A PLAIN TALE OF THE WOODS. 



F. A. VERPLANCK. 



As a boy I liked to go fishing, and as a 
man I have not lost my liking for a rod 
and line ; but I fail somewhat of reaching 
the standard demanded of the ideal angler, 
for I can not sit all day in a boat and 
drown worms nor can 1 follow a reputed 
trout brook all day without a nibble. I can 
not patiently endure the pleasantries of my 
family when I return tired and hungry, with 
an empty basket, after a day's fishing. On 
the other hand, I am not devoted to fishing 
for the sake of the fish, yet in order that 
fishing may have any pleasure for me, at 
occasional and irregular intervals fish must 
be caught. 

For several years I had longed to go 
where fish could be caught by an amateur. 
I had also wished to go far into the prime- 
val woods, where I could be free from the 
bustle and worry of civilization. Uncon- 
sciously to me, the wood gods were calling. 

After reading many advertisements, I se- 
lected a camp remote from the railroad and 
wrote the proprietor. I received a prompt 
reply saying that the camp was surrounded 
with lakes and streams in which trout rose 
to the fly every day in the summer, that 
deer were often seen, that prices were rea- 
sonable, and that I would be welcome. 

The phrase, "trout rose to the fly," set me 
thinking. I had never seen a fly. My list 
of bait had included crickets, frogs, dob- 
sons, and the ordinary worm, which I after- 
ward learned to call a ground hackle. 1 
dispatched a second letter confessing my ig- 
norance of fly fishing, and asked instruc- 
tions as to what I should buy. In that I was 
wise. The reply gave me exact and minute 
instructions as to rods, lines and flies. It 
also contained a sentence which at the time 
made little impression on me, but which I 
afterward found to be full of significance. 
It said, "I will meet you at Bemis and con- 
duct you to camp." 

An afternoon in Boston and a badly bro- 
ken $20 bill supplied me with the necessary 
equipment for fly fishing. An earlv start 
from Boston and a long ride by rail took 
my wife and me at sunset to the end of the 
narrow gauge. There we found a good 
stage, and a ride of 12 miles or more took 
us to the Hunt house, a good supper and a 
good bed. 

After breakfast the next morning my edu- 
cation began. Before noon I had learned 
more about the Maine woods than I could 
have learned in a dozen evenings from 
books. The ways and manners of the Maine 
guide or hotel proprietor are worthy of 
study. He is a gentleman. He does not ob- 
trude his superior knowledge of the woods 



on you, yet, if you are observant, you may 
learn from many an apparently chance le- 
mark. 

I found that Joe's camp was 16 miles 
away, somewhat more remote from the rail- 
road than I had supposed. I said that joe 
was coming to "conduct me to camp," and 
that I had written him to meet me. The 
proprietor of the hotel said, "Joe did not 
come out last night. He will leave his 
camp early this morning and you will see 
him about 3 o'clock this afternoon. He will 
take you in to camp to-morrow." Eight 
or 10 hours for 16 miles ! I began to real- 
ize that the road must have some charac- 
teristics with which I was unfamiliar. My 
face may have revealed my state of mind, 
for one of the witnesses remarked, "That 
road out to Joe's is a little rough in some 
places." The hint was enough, and I asked 
no more questions. I would take the road 
as I found it and would soon know all 
about it. 

Hotel proprietors sometimes make mis- 
takes, for at 10 o'clock Joe came. He had 
left his camp early and had come straight 
through. He had pushed a pair of horses 
over 16 miles in 5 hours. I afterward 
learned that it was the record. If it had not 
been the talk of the town for the morning, 
the feat would not have surprised me. Soon 
Joe announced that after feeding and a 
short rest for the horses, he proposed to re- 
turn. This upset all local traditions. No 
team had ever been over that road twice 
in one day. No Yankee would do it. Joe's 
German blood was held accountable. 

I had time to examine Joe's buckboard 
I had seen buckboards at Bar Harbor, but 
this was not of the Bar Harbor variety. 
The wheels were as large as the wheels of 
a heavy team wagon, and the connecting 
links were planks. It was not painted and 
was banged and marred. It had evidently 
seen much service, largely over that 16 miles 
of road. 

When Joe asked for my baggage, I scored 
my first success, for I brought out 2 suit 
cases. "I guess you have been in the woods 
before. They generally bring 2 trunks," 
said one of the witnesses ; but Joe was get- 
ting out rope enough to rig a small cat- 
boat. It all went to tie the suit cases on 
the buckboard. My respect for the 16 miles 
increased. 

At last we were off. The road out of the 
village was smooth and pleasant ; but we 
soon came to Deep river, which we had to 
ford. We began to realize that we were 
off the macadam. Of late our country has 
experienced a great wave of interest in good 



22 



RECREATION. 



roads. I had not previously realized the 
importance of the movement, but the sub- 
ject was coming home to me. Joe said there 
were 3 kinds of roads in Maine — roads, 
buckboard roads, and tote roads. The va- 
riety which was engaging our attention was 
a buckboard road. 

You take a buckboard road lengthways. 
The trees by its side keep you in the one 
narrow way. It is not a case of shake well 
before taking. You are well shaken while 
you are taken, and the effects of the treat- 
ment last even unto the third day. A buck- 
board road has not been brought to a defin- 
ite grade, yet it has a general level, usually 
the level of the mud and water which fill 
it. Above this level rise the rocks as high 
as the axle tree. Below this level extends 
the mud to the depth of the hub. An occa- 
sional log is thrown in for good measure. 
By some curious process of nature the rocks 
and mud holes have been so arranged that, 
when the fore wheel on one side of the buck- 
board is on top of a rock, the opposite hind 
wheel is deep in the mud. In the space of 
2 seconds this situation is reversed. The 
fore wheel drops violently, and the hind 
wheel, with a scrape and a slip or 2, reaches 
the top of the next rock. It is a continu- 
ous performance, rocks and mud, then mud 
and rocks. For variety there is now and then 
a swamp or the swampy margin of some 
lake. There the corduroy road prevails. 
It is made of straight logs laid side by side 
in the mud. This road also has not been 
brought to a definite grade. Both front 
wheels pass over a log at the same time. 
When they are well over, the back wheels 
together pass over a log. If the planks of 
the ' buckboard are springy, you realize 
whence the buckboard took its name and 
think of the bucking bronco of the plains. 
Often the logs get out of place and bunch 
together. The horses jump the vacant- 
places and the wheels bring up on the pile 
of logs and then quickly go over them. In 
this case you hang on and take the bump- 
ing which you are sure to get. The driver 
advises you to sit loose, and you are nearly 
thrown out of the buckboard. Then you 
get your feet braced and sit tight and are 
soon wearied by the jar. You can not get 
rid of the buckboard road, for like the poor 
it is always with you ; yet it is not so bad 
as you might think, and there are some mit- 
igating features. 

After 9 miles we came to Deer lake, where 
we saw our first log camp. The proprietor 
soon had dinner ready for us, trout fresh 
from the lake, and for dessert, mince pie. 
Mince pie in midsummer! Mince pie 1,000 
miles from Chicago and the stock yards! 
Mince pie 9 miles from Bemis and over a 
buckboard road ! Shades of last fall's deer 
and moose! How can these things be? 

While the horses rested we walked on. 



It was a clear August dav, with the cus- 
tomary heat tempered delightfully by a cool 
Northwest breeze ; a day with here and 
there a fleecy, fair weather cloud, giving its 
delicate hint of beautiful October. The sides 
of the road were lined with bushes loaded 
with blueberries and red raspberries. We 
lingered for a second dessert. Occasion- 
ally there were large beds of trailing arbu- 
tus with a richness of green foliage which 
excited our admiration. Everywhere scar- 
let bunchberries shone amid the green 
ground pine which trailed artistically over 
the decaying logs. The soft leaves of the 
moose maple brushed us in the face. Here 
and there we passed through the deep shade 
of primeval trees which had escaped the axe 
of the woodman. The air was redolent of 
spruce and balsam. In the quiet and peace 
we rested and invited our souls. Time 
passed unconsciously. The spell was bro- 
ken when my wife said, pointing to a brown 
spot on the hill side, "What's that?" I did 
not know, and we sat and watched it. It 
moved. Its head appeared. It was a deer. 
It looked about for a few seconds and then 
moved away, unconscious that its human 
enemy was at hand. We had seen our first 
deer without the aid of a guide, and noth- 
ing more seemed necessary to complete our 
first day in the woods. 

However, the aspect of nature was rap- 
idly changing. Dark clouds were gathering 
about the top of a mountain to the North- 
ward. The wind was rising and the woods 
were growing dark. A low, far-away 
grumble .of thunder reached our ears. A 
storm would soon be upon us. We looked 
for Joe and the buckboard and then lis- 
tened for the rumble of the wheels. He 
came none too soon, with the wraps and 
rubber blankets. We must endure what- 
ever nature had in store for us, and pre- 
pared to face in the open whatever might 
come, for roof there was none. Just as 
the shower reached us, we came to a river. 
The wind-driven storm made the surface 
of the water smoke. The blinding sheets 
of rain curled around the horses, and they 
stopped midstream, but the whip compelled 
them to go on. We crossed a triangular 
piece of land and came to a second river, 
which was running swiftly into the first. 
Again the poor horses were exposed to the 
wind and rain ; but we were soon across 
and sheltered under a grouo of spruces, 
where we sat out the storm. 

When it was over, we resumed our jour- 
ney over the buckboard road. Darkness 
came on. We crossed the river twice and 
drove half a mile in the bed of the stream. 
We toiled slowly up a long grade. At last 
we saw the welcome lights of the camp ; 
and cold, wet and hungry we pulled up. 
Joe was out before us and with match in 
hand ran in, while we slowly followed. 



A PLAIN TALE OF THE WOODS. 



23 



It was a new leg camp, which had never 
been occupied. The smell of the woods 
poured from every log. A large fireplace 
made of rough stones and piled high with 
well seasoned cedar filled one end of the 
room. In an instant the fire was burning 
and in a few minutes the whole camp was 
lighted by the cheerful blaze. We threw 
off wet wraps and basked in the generous 
heat. 

A little later, in the dining camp, we 
did justice to a menu which included 
trout, biscuit, and coffee. We began to 
know and appreciate the appetite which the 
life in the woods always brings. After 
supper we sat around the cheerful fire in 
the privacy of our own camp and discussed 
the events of the day. 

The next morning my second day's edu- 
cation began. I learned from Joe that all 
who are at any time found within the 
boundaries of Maine are divided into 2 
great groups : sportsmen and natives. The 
sportsmen only summer in Maine. The 
natives are able to live in Maine both 
winter and summer, because the sportsmen 
come with their money and summer in 
Maine. Again, the sportsmen are divided 
into 2 classes, the dead game type and 
the tomato-can type. The dead game sports- 
man lives in the woods and all that in 
them is. He does things for himself, lives 
the life of the woods, and rejoices therein. 
The tomato-can sport lingers near the 
camp, wears the clothing of civilization 
and, if he fires a rifle, uses the ignominious 
tomato-can as a target. I must prove that 
I had within me the making of a dead game 
sportsman or lose caste at once. 

Just back of the camo, in a wild gorge, 
flowed a mountain stream, with a deep 
pool. To that I went with my new fishing 
equipment and whipped the pool, the bushes, 
the pile of logs at the side of the pool, 
and caught the back of my hat. My 2 
hours of practice did not go unrewarded, 
for one trout of kindergarten age rose to 
my fly, was hooked and landed. Time 
after time I practiced at the pool until I 
could sometimes cast the fly as I wished. 

Joe took me out on the lake in a canoe 
and I fished while he paddled, but I had 
indifferent success. It occurred to me that 
the correct method of fishing might be 
learned by observation, so I asked Joe to 
take the rod while I took the paddle. I 
soon found that I had other work in hand 
than watching the fishing. Joe had made 
the canoe obey the slightest movement of 
the paddle. Under my direction it went 
where it listed. By using the paddle on 
both sides of the canoe, I could approxi- 
mate the result I wished ; but how to di- 
rect the canoe by using the paddle on only 
one side was a mystery. One day I stole 
away from the camp and, putting the canoe 



into the lake, practiced until I had at least 
rudimentary ideas of paddling. 

One morning there was a drizzling rain. 
A cheerful fire and a novel made the storm 
far from unendurable, but by the middle 
of the afternoon the day dragged, so we 
decided to go somewhere. Clad in warm 
wraps we started for the lake. My wife 
took the bow of the canoe and the rod, 
while I took the stern to demonstrate my 
newly acquired skill with the paddle. We 
soon tired of fishing, and paddled down 
to the end of the lake to a large bush-piled 
mound, the home of a colony of beavers. 
We wished that one of the beavers would 
come out, so we might brag that we had 
seen both deer and beaver. We let the 
canoe drift out into the lake while we 
watched the clouds which were continually 
forming around the top of a mountain to 
the West. After a time the sunset rays 
broke through the clouds, promising better 
things for the morrow. We drifted on 
and watched the great, silent woods as 
they slowly changed from light to dark 
and grew hazy and indistinct in the dis- 
tance. A crazy loon far down the lake 
filled the huge stillness with his uncanny 
laughter. I recalled my sensations when 
as a boy I must pass a graveyard in the 
night. An animal was swimming not far 
from the canoe. Confident in my newly 
acquired knowledge of woodcraft, and re- 
calling a pond of my* boyhood days, I 
gravely announced that it was a muskrat. 
With a crash which aroused the echoes 
across the lake, it suddenly dived. We 
were too startled for the moment to realize 
that we had seen a beaver. It is a good 
thing to be an amateur. It is a good thing 
not to have seen the whole world and 
the glory thereof. We went back to camp 
with a greater feeling of pride in having 
seen our first beaver than a more hardened 
veteran of the woods might experience in 
having killed a moose. 

One morning Joe said, "Don't you want 
to camp out?" We wished everything that 
was our due, and were ready to accept any 
invitation. An hour later we left camp. 
Joe, axe in hand, carried a large leather 
pack which contained the food and cooking 
utensils. I was carrying my first pack, 
which was made largely of a huge roll of 
blankets. My wife and Mrs. H., whose 
acquaintance we had made in camp, led the 
way and made the pace. A rough trail 
through the woods, with a noisy stream on 
our right, took us, after an hour, to a 
•dam, a relic of the old logging times. It 
was a huge structure which had in its 
youthful days successfully checked a moun- 
tain stream. It had been assaulted annually 
by acres of floating logs, but had valiantly 
held its place. Now its only value was as 
a footbridge, or perhaps some tramp 



24 



RECREATION. 



beavers lived in the little pool of water 
which lay behind it. The structure of the 
dam was worthy of study. But 2 tools had 
been used in the construction of the frame- 
work, the axe and the augur. The logs 
had been squared and fitted with the axe, 
wkile straight oak pins riveted them to- 
gether. The stream had carried away near- 
ly all the earth from the apron. The great 
wooden structure, rising across the stream 
like the skeleton of some gigantic animal 
of the past, showed the honest work of 
the builders. The dam had been bleached 
and whitened by the storms of many win- 
ters, but was still staunch enough to with- 
stand many spring freshets. 

Over the dam we went and on up a 
steep hillside until we reached a large lake. 
Joe produced a canoe from a thicket, and 
we and our impedimenta were soon afloat. 
If we were to have trout for our dinner, 
we must catch them ; so I cast from the 
bow while Joe slowly paddled. 

In less than an hour we were at the 
camping place, but it was an hour filled 
with such experiences as can be had only 
in the woods. In it I caught more trout 
than we wished for our dinner, and 4 deer 
kindly posed for us from the shore. As 
we rounded one point a deer was standing 
knee deep in the water, either drinking or 
feeding on the lily pads. With a start he 
raised his head and faced us. His antlers 
had not less than 10 points, and he was 
worthy to be a model for Landseer. He 
gazed while the canoe drifted. We silent- 
ly watched him and admired his graceful 
form. In all that wilderness we were the 
only living things he could not trust. He 
bounded away and the spruces hid him. 

We soon put into a little opening where 
a tiny stream flowed into the lake. A few 
rods back, on a round knoll covered with 
maples and having a background of dark 
spruces, was a well made leanto. There 
deer hunters camped in the fall while they 
hunted the region about the lake. Its ends 
and frame were made of logs stoutly 
pinned together. The roof was made of 
spruce bark and was supposed to be water- 
tight. The leanto was open toward the 
lake and before it were the coals and 
ashes of former camp fires. Joe made a 
fire, I cleaned the fish at the brook, the 
women cut the bacon, and soon the trout 
were frying. In the open air we had din- 
ner, with no sauce but our appetites, and 
no orchestra but the murmur of the brook. 

Tn the afternoon we paddled to the up- 
per end of the lake and then far up the 
winding stream which was its main source. 
Great herons, with shrill cries and dangling 
legs, flew up from the tamarack swamps 
about us. The stream was filled with trout, 
and we caught all we wished and stopped. 
Why kill in wantonness? 



At sunset we went back to the lake. The 
dying wind had left no ripple. The sur- 
face of the lake stretched before us bathed 
in a' flood of sunset light. Thousands of in- 
sects were dancing joyously in the glow. 
Birds were skimming here and there over 
the surface, the trout were feeding and 
broke all about us. Not a square rod of 
surface was for a minute undisturbed. We 
could have caught a hundred trout if we 
had been in the mood to kill. 

After supper we cut balsam and filled 
the floor of the leanto with boughs, on 
which we spread our blankets. Then piling 
the fire high with maple wood, we lay on 
the blankets and enjoyed the warmth. The 
lake before us was shrouded in mist, the 
tops of the hills across the lake were grow- 
ing indistinct in the rapidly fading twilight, 
the new moon had but a short journey to 
her repose behind the hazy sky line. The 
darkness deepened and we were gradually 
shut in by the trees about us and the small 
patch of sky overhead. 

Wrapped in a blanket, Joe smoked and 
told us of the life of the trapper and 
woodsman in those wilds in the winter. 
He told stories of the fall hunting for bear 
and moose. At last came the fanciful 
stories held in stqre and told to each new 
comer. The climax was the story of the 
trout which had been tamed and lived in 
camp. Faithfully it followed its master, 
but alas, while attempting to cross a stream 
on an ice-coated log, it was drowned. 

Did we sleep? We wrapped ourselves 
in our blankets, we extended our feet to 
the fire, we inserted our heads under the 
eaves of the leanto, said good-night for 
the last time, and kept on talking. We 
arose and renlenished the fire. We in- 
formed each inquirer as to the exact hour 
of the night. We made remarks deroga- 
tory to the mental equipment of the loon. 
We compared the relative discomforts of 
the bough bed and the buckboard road. 
We concluded that the bed, like the road, 
had not been brought to a definite level. ' 

It is probably safe to say that each per- 
son had a nap. We wore out the night, 
and arising early refreshed ourselves in 
the Qold water of the brook. The wood 
gods were kind, for they gave us a beauti- 
ful morning and a good breakfast. By 
noon we were back in the main camp with 
nothing but the pleasantest memories of 
the lake and its leanto. 

The time came when we had to return 
to the exactions of civilization and its 
routine of duties. We did not dread the 
buckboard road. It was a part of the great 
woods which we had seen and enjoyed. 
We planned to go back to camp the next 
summer, for we had been inoculated and 
the bacilli of joy of the wild life had 
worked itself through our whole being. 



A NEW YEAR'S CALL. 



E. H. BLOOD. 



A ranchman living in a lonely cabin in 
North Park, Colorado, had just returned 
from over the range, bringing with him his 
winter's supplies, and after storing them 
carefully away in his cabin he went to visit 
a friend who lived some miles down the 
valley. He celebrated the New Year with 
his fellow ranchman, and again returned 
home. 

As he rode up to the house he noticed 
large tracks in the snow. The door, which 
he had securely closed, stood wide open, 
and there was a general air of life about 
the place. Approaching cautiously he heard 
loud growling and snarling, coming from 
within the cabin. Suddenly there appeared 
in the doorway a full grown cinnamon bear. 
In an instant another, though smaller one, 
stood beside it, and from the noise in the 
cabin there seemed to be a family gather- 
ing. The ranchman's horse became unman- 
ageable with fright, and the owner with- 
drew some distance, where he stonned to 
think what he should do. His guns were in 
the house, and he dared not approach too 
near, so he decided to return to his neigh- 
bor's for help. 

When the men returned, some hours 
later, armed, and accompanied by 2 dogs, 
the bears had gone. From an examination 
of their tracks it was found that there were 
2 full grown bears and 3 cubs. 

Entering the cabin, the men beheld a sight 
both tragic and humorous. A cyclone could 
scarcely have caused more destruction. The 
bears had evidently expected refreshments, 
and finding none set out for them, decided 
to help themselves. A sack of flour which 



had stood in one corner of the room had 
first attracted their attention. Tearing it 
open they had frolicked and rolled in the 
flour until it was strewn all over the place. 
Rice, tea, coffee, potatoes and sugar were 
mixed and scattered about in an indescrib- 
able manner. A side of bacon which had 
been suspended from the rafters had been 
torn down and partially devoured, and the 
molasses jug was empty. 

On a rude bedstead in another part of 
the room- had been the pride of the ranch- 
man, a last relic of civilization, brought 
with him from his home in the East — a 
feather bed ; but it was no longer a feather 
bed, for the feathers floated gayly about 
the room, and the bears had apparently had 
great sport with them. 

At last, however, they had found what 
must have proved a rather painful surprise, 
a bag of cayenne pepper. This was too 
much for even a bear's sense of humor, and 
doubtless ended the feast. 

As the owner of the cabin gazed about 
him at the wholesale destruction of his win- 
ter's supplies he determined to have some 
bear meat, so he and his neighbor set out 
with the dogs to follow the trail. They 
finally found one of the old bears and 2 
cubs, the others having wandered off in 
another direction. 

The hunters succeeded in killing the old 
bear and one of the cubs ; the other escaped. 

The dead bears presented an amusing ap- 
pearance. In their fur still lingered a mix- 
ture of molasses, feathers and flour ; enough, 
the ranchman said, to last him the rest of 
the winter. 



THE BEARS' PICNIC. 

GEO. A. WILLIAMS, M.D. 



Ole Mr. Bear, take off his coat, 
Mighty glad he kotch dem shoat; 
One shoat's big an' de odder one's little, 
Ole Mis' Bear, git out yo' kittle. 

Young Mr. Bear, jes play dat tune, 
Hop light Lou an' ole Zip Coon ; 
All dem little bears a dancin', 
Ole Mis' Bear she keep on prancin'. 



Swing you' pardners, raise yo' han', 
Keep yo' eye on de Voodoo man; 
Balance all an' take yo' fling, 
Right shasay an' pigeon wing. 

Ole Mr. Fox he look so sly, 
Brudder Rabbit wink his eye; 
We done fool ole farmer Jones, 
Steal dem shoat an' pick dem bones. 



De chipmunk whistle an' de blue jay sing, 
Jes' bring yo' fiddle an' come agin ; 
Ole Mr. Bear done make his call, 
Bes' respec's an' good night all. 



*6 



NOT SO HARD AS IT LOOKS. 



The photos I send you herewith depict 
illusions. I drove into the ground a pole 
which is just as high as the young man 
with his arms outstretched. The pole is back 
of the young man's right leg and his arm. 



pole and bears no weight whatever on the 
young man below. 

The photo showing the little girl was, of 
course, made in the same way. 






AT ARM S LENGTH. 

The pole is no wider at the top than the 
man's wrist, hence is completely hidden. 
The man on the top is standing on the 




A BIG LOAD. 



26 



RECREATION. 



27 



t*°t 



01- 



^ -5 



k*XA- 



3 



x 



- T 



t>.ijs.-:ii ■' 



HOW IT WAS DONE. 

The accompanying drawing shows how it 
is done. 

R. D. Von Nieda, Ephrata, Pa. 

A boy was spending his vacation in the 
country with his grandparents. One day 
he was walking in the fields with his grand- 
father, and was surprised to see all the 
cows chewing their cuds. Not understand- 
ing what it meant, he exclaimed : 

"Do you have to buy chewing gum for 
all them cows, grandpa?" — Albany Journal. 



Father (from top of staircase) — Ethel, 
is that young man gone? 
Ethel — Awfully, pa. — Grit. 



ROAST PORK. 

E. L. TAYLOR. 

We vas sometimes tink's allreatty dot der 

pigs hafe all been found 
But we'll read of some in next month's 

Recreation. 
Dot no hunter mon vos smaller as a flea 

dot zhumps around 
But we'll read of him in next month's 

Recreation. 
Mit his leedle dog und gun tin anodder hog 

to boot 
He'll start oud in der morning for a day 

of grunt und shoot. 
A million years togedder wit der pigs dey 

ought to root 
Und read a page each day in Recreation. 
Dere's bristles on anodder hog all up und 

down his spine. 
We'll read of him in next month's Recrea- 
tion. 
He's got a dollar und he owns a rod and 

line — 
About it we will read in Recreation. 
He's fishing in der morning und he's fish- 
ing in der night. 
He's fishing yet to-morrow if der fish will 

only bite. 
Und dere he has a photo made 
Sh.ust like it was all right 
For decent men to see in Recreation. 
They vas need a roasting und they needs 

it mighty bad 
They'll get it too I think in Recreation. 
But nodding ever enters there to make 

a sportsman mad — - 
Each one has got a friend in Recreation. 
Ven I eats mine saur kraut und drinks 

mine lager beer, 
Coquina's health I give a toast und wish 

dot he vos here, 
I'd like to shook him by der hand dot pulls 

der butcher's ear. 
I do it too by reading Recreation. 



BLONDES. 

Blondes are of 2 kinds: the real and the 
chemical. It has, however, been ascertained 
by several observers that real blondes are 
often false. 

The real blonde ranges 4 to 6 feet in 
height and over various parts of the coun- 
try. Her eyes are gray, blue and goo-goo. 
In common with others oi her sex, she is 
supported at length with some difficulty, but 
at short intervals with ease. She toys with 
her victims and delights in being loved. 

The chemical blonde is self made and 
correspondingly independent. She is man- 
ufactured extensively in all districts, and 
appears to be much brighter than she 
really is. She is easily caressed, and ex- 
pensive when allowed to have her own way. 

Her eyes and her ways are apt to be 
dark. — Life. 



SOME OTHER DOGS. 



DELLA BELLAMY. 



I have known intimately in my life 3 
dogs. The second is the one whose character- 
istics pleased me the most. My acquaint- 
ance with the first dog was when I was 
but 6 years of age. and was altogether too 
intimate. He bit me terribly. Scars are on 
my face to this day, faint, but discernible. 
As the result of the attack I was confined 
to my bed 2 weeks. Soon after I was out 
of danger, and my parents assured by the 
surgeon that eyesight would not be lost, as 
was at first feared, some one told me that 
if the dog by whom I was bitten ever had 
hydrophobia I would have it also. I be- 
lieved that yarn a number of years, and 
lived in daily expectation of leaving my 
family at a moment's notice. It is useless 
to say that T felt the need of being always 
prepared, which partly accounts for my 
adhering strictly to the truth and leading 
a different life. In the light of after years 
I have had reason to be grateful to that 
dog. The affair cast a shadow on my 
young life, however. 

My acquaintance with the second dog, a 
puppy 6 months old, began when I was 
about 9 years of age. An uncle returned 
from down the river, where he had been 
spending some time, and this dog, Choco, 
followed him home. Though my uncle was 
much affected by this, he wrote back to the 
dog's owner, who was an innkeper, the 
facts concerning the puppy. The man re- 
plied that if Choco had found some one 
whom he preferred for a master he would 
not stand in the puppy's way, nor would 
he accept any payment for him. My uncle 
had an idea that possibly Choco left his 
home through jealousy. He had a twin 
brother, his exact counterpart, who was 
petted and made much of also, and my 
uncle fancied Choco could not stand that. 
There did not seem to be any reason why 
this puppy should have been called Choco, 
unless, perhaps, on account of his color, 
which was a fine chocolate. He had eyes 
of the same color, and a white nose. His 
collar, shirt bosom and stockings were also 
while, lie was a large, short haired dog, 
evidently a cross between a smooth coated 
St. Bernard and a bull terrier; most beau- 
tifully formed, but not a type. It was a pity 
he was only a monsfrel, with his intelli- 
gence and noble qualities. Choco had been 
with us 2 months before we ever heard 
him bark. We thought he did not know 
how. bul my uncle assured us he did and 
would do so when a fitting occasion ar- 
rived. There was great excitement in the 
family when we first heard the deep, mu- 
sical tones which issued from his canine 



chest. The cow had gone into the horse 
barn. Choco thought such lawlessness de- 
served a reprimand. He drove her out 
without interference from the family, who 
were standing spellbound because the dog 
had barked. 

Choco was an aristocratic dog. Peddlers 
were held in abhorrence, poorly dressed peo- 
ple likewise. He would follow them, growl- 
ing ominously, until they were beyond his 
premises, then turn and go back to the 
piazza. He was affectionate toward his 
friends. When one of the family came 
around the* corner in sight of the house he 
would run like a whirlwind to meet him 
and circle around every few steps, leaping 
and wagging his tail, but was too well bred 
ever to put his tongue on one's face or 
hands. Then he would precede his friend 
to the house joyfully. 

I once sat by the window and saw Choco 
rush toward the corner to meet some one. 
I thought it must be the uncle who brought 
him to us, as the other members of the 
family were at home. Not so. It was an 
uncle, but one he had never seep before. 
He came back with this uncle, making as 
great demonstrations of affection as he 
would have made had one of us been gone 
months and just returned. That was the 
first_ and only time he ever appeared pleased 
to see a stranger. 

I never had reason to be afraid of him 
but once. He had buried a bone and gone 
a short distance away. I dug it up, keeping 
my back toward him during the operation, 
so he could not see what I was doing, re- 
placed the soil and went away, carrying the 
bone on the farther side of me. He went 
to the place as soon as I was gone, patted 
the dirt down with his nose and walked 
off without discovering the loss of the 
treasure. I then called him to me, drew the 
bone from behind my back and showed it to 
him. His eyes turned black and fierce. He 
gave a lunge. I dropped the bone just in 
time. He took it, put it back where it was, 
covered it and sat down on the spot. I 
went toward him, he gave a low, savage 
growl and I retreated. A few steps for- 
ward and T fear my mother would have 
lost her child. 

The next winter after he came to live 
with us my father went out of the front 
door one dav to the middle of the road 
and stenned into a sleigh. A while after- 
ward Choco came from the barn and 
tracked father from the porch to the road, 
where the tracks stopped. Choco ran a few 
steps in either direction, looked up into 
the sky and all around, and finallv cotn- 



28 



SOME OTHER DOGS. 



29 



menced to dig in the ground, evidently be- 
lieving father had gone down instead of 
np. My father returned soon, which put a 
stop to the excavating. Choco had made a 
hole about a foot deep. I have never seen 
such manifestations of joy as Choco ex- 
hibited when he ran to meet my father. We 
chaffed father about that for a long time. 

My uncle came and went irregularly, 
sometimes being gone a month or 2, and he 
finally stayed away entirely ; but Choco did 
not seem to miss him greatly. 

Choco's sense of honor was fine. Many 
a small dog's part has he taken when the 
little fellow was getting the worst of a 
battle. In the 10 years Choco lived I never 
knew him to have but one fight of his own. 
As I did not see the commencement of it, 

1 do not know whether he was justified or 
not, but believe he was. His previous 
character warranted that conclusion. 

Choco's one mistake in regard to right 
and wrong was that he would let a man 
put his coat or dinner pail in the barn, but 
would not let him get it again. Some one 
of the family would have to get the article 
and hand it to its owner. 

I have laughed until exhausted many a 
time to see that dog laugh. He would draw 
the corners of his mouth back and look so 
foolish, especially when gaiters were put on 
him. One member of the family gave him 

2 pairs of discarded cloth shoes. I used to 
tie them on his feet. After getting used .to 
the performance, each foot was held up in 
turn until all were shod. Then he would 
jump up and run around, raising his feet 
higher than usual. Some one would open 
the door, when he would run out into the 
village, circle around and come home again, 
evidently thinking the trip up town part of 
his act. 

Choco and the butcher became great- 
friends. It seems that the way to a dogjs 
heart also is through his stomach. 

One night at bedtime the dog was not to 
be found. We went to the butcher's to see 
if he knew anything about Choco. He said : 

"I'll bet a hen I've locked him up in the 
market. Well, never mind;, now. He's 
probably damaged all the meat by this time 
that he will." 

When the butcher started out in the 
morning father went with him. They found 
the dog shut up in the market, but none of 
the meat had been touched by canine teeth. 
As a reward for his honesty he was given 
a chunk of liver, which he ate ravenously. 

Not only was this dog honorable, but he 
had a taste for music. In my repertoire was 
one selection that would bring him into the 
room as soon as the first bars were played. 
He would sit on his haunches, wag his tail, 
turn his head, this way and that, with evi- 
dent enjoyment, and look much interested, 
never leaving the room as long as that 



composition was being played. I played it 
2 hours once, to see if he would tire of it, 
but at the end of that time he showed no 
signs of fatigue. When other music was 
played he would retire, but come again 
when his favorite was commenced. That 
was years ago. The music is lost and I 
can not even remember its name. I have 
wasted more effort trying to remember that 
air than on anything else ever forgotten. 
As the wheel of memory turns around the 
name of that composition does not come 
up. Possibly it was located on the outer 
surface of the tire and has worn off with 
many years' use. I should like to play that 
piece to other dogs and watch its effect. 

The third dog is a Scotch collie, owned 
by my father-in-law, across the way. This 
dog drives the cows fairly well, but waltzes 
better. When the team starts out for work 
in the morning Shepherd goes ahead, danc- 
ing as prettily as any belle in a ballroom v 
round and round, reversing every fourth 
turn, backward and forward, with the 
greatest precision. He has a daughter, 
owned by a neighbor, and she is bringing 
Shepherd's gray hairs in sorrow to the 
grave. She gives him an awful drubbing 
whenever he passes her house. Of late our 
driver stops when nearing the premises. 
Shepherd leaps into the wagon and passes 
in safety. The team is stopped again when 
the danger is passed and Shepherd jumps 
out and goes on his way. Needless to say 
this dog does not approve of the new woman. 

Although I have paid little attention to 
Shepherd, he is fond of me. I once went 
for a 3 days' visit to my parents. The sec- 
ond day the dog put in an appearance, evi- 
dently having come to find me. I fed him 
well, intending to take him back the next 
day on returning. In about half an hour 
he was missing. On arriving home I told 
my father-in-law's people what time the 
dog came and when he disappeared. They 
said they missed him during the morning, 
but he was there at noon. He could not 
have tracked me, as part of my journey was 
by rail. 

Shepherd at one time thought he would 
live at mv house, but he gave it up on hav- 
ing a bell rung vigorously close to his ears. 

This dog is not allowed to follow the 
carriage, and often when it is drawn out 
he disappears, only to emerge when it is a 
mile or so away from home, following at 
a respectful distance. A mile farther brings 
him abreast of the horses ; another mile 
finds him leaping, waltzing and running 
ahead of the team. No one has ever been 
able to make him go back. Whipping has 
been resorted to with no effect. He curls 
down in the road, making himself as small 
as possible, and takes the punishment as a 
good child takes bad medicine; but he will 
not budge. 



REFLECTIONS. 



The other night while lying half asleep 

I though I heard the boy who owned me 
say: 
"I hate to take old Tatters out because 

I saw the dog team go by here to-day." 
And then I fell asleep again and dreamed 

Of awful things that any dog could know, 
And when next day I saw a throng of boys 
About a team and heard a lot of noise, 

I rushed away as hard as I could go. 



I know the fellows chased me, and I ran 
And doubled back and forth till all worn 
out. 
I went down on the pier to rest, 

When pretty soon I heard an awful shout, 
And looked around to see a baby's shoe 
Go floating by the spot where I was 
placed. 
And then I barked, and, jumping up, could 

not refrain 
From plunging in. When I came up again 
I held her by some fluffy thing around her 
waist. 



So that's the reason why I do not fear 
The dog team now. My license you can 
see 
Upon my collar plate, and ain't it queer 
That everybody thinks so much of me ! 
For I am staying at that big house on the 
hill, 
And all I have to do is just to curl 
Myself upon a rug, or romp and play. 
While when folks come I hear a lady say: 
"That is the dog that saved my little 
girl." 

Yet, how I miss the boys and all the fun 
We used to have up in that alley dim ! 
And yesterday .when we were out to drive 
I saw them going down the dock to have 
a swim. 
The driver held me so I could not go, 
Yet, while I barked at them in glad sur- 
prise, 
They shouted : "Jimmy ! Look at Tatters," 

and he knew 
That I still loved him. As they passed 
from view 
I saw him draw his "sleeve across his 

eyes. 
— Dan W. Gallagher, in Boston Globe. 




MY FISHING RESORT. 
30 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY GEO . W, BEARD. 



ANTOINE'S HEN SPECULATION. 



E. W. PARKER. 



Bon jour, hevery body! 'Spose you all 
feel so wal I do — I'm glad me. I'm feel 
yong like I was only t'irty ear ole, an I'm 
hurry do my job juss a same as long tarn 
ago when I'm tuk stent for chop home 
cord hood in t'ree hour. An de tarn I'm 
kip a smile on my contenance, for I hav one 
boss speckleation on my hed, and I'magine 
I can hear de monee jingle in my pocket 
hevery tam I mak wiggle; but I learn one 
new ting I never know before, an I'm find 
out it is much hard work for raise som' 
shicken. But he fetch bully price when 
he get ripe, an noting so good for mak 
happy lak dat merry monee musique. He 
mak de hole worl move rond. He mak de 
railrod go. He mak de ole mare go (I 
read dat). He mak plentee Yankee come 
on my great contree for live — and— he mak 
de bully boss tam for all de Canadinee — 
a-n-d he mak de pork and bean grow for 
Antine. I'm glad for dat, and heveryting 
gon all rat, long you get plentee monee. 
But one ting I'm tole you I hav not ver 
much of dat, and I'm gon ver short of 
tobac, and spose heverybody not have more 
monee I do — Bagosh de railrode will go 
slow, and de street car will not be able to 
pull hees lode mos half way up on top de 
hill. 

Now I'm bodder so much for get de cash 
all what I want dat I'm mak good eel medi- 
tation. When I'm saw hood wit my arms 
I work it wit my lied for mak plan for 
more a heasy way for git along. Some tam 
my hole lady tole me she's watch me when 
I'm work, an I'm stan still an look on one 
plas for 10 minit, an not mak a motion — 
I was so loss to heveryting gon on ron my 
dooryard. I can't beleve dat, but Mr. Edi- 
son do juss a sam lak dat when he gon mak 
his talk machine — so I'm tole. Wall, I'm 
not do dat for noting for at de lass end of 
dat 10 minit ah'm raise my eye and bah 
gosh what you tink ole man, firs ting I see 
was my little flock of hen stan ron dar on 
one legs watch me saw hood and dat very 
minit I'm get my hinspiration — I will go 
on de hen bizness jus so tite I can jomp 
and me I will be "reech man or buss." 

'An I trow my cap on de air 
way op on de an ron on de house for 
lay my prodjeck before my hole leddy. 
She's tole me he's too busy to hear my 
fool notion. She's cant stop fry his nut- 
cake and wase he's time, but I'm slap my 
laig and tell she for hole on a minit an 
let hees nut-cake gon to grass for I'm 
hatch a plan for mak it more monee he can 
lug, an I mak yell hoora, hoora and trow 



my cap on top de cat and scare heem lak a 
dev. Den she's tak off hees glasses an look 
at me, and I no for sartin when he look 
lak dat I'm hear somtings, so I prepare for 
dat. Here twas it : 

"Antine? Be you crazy lunytick? Are 
you one hole fools? Whas de matter come 
on you? Go set down." Now I'm good 
hand for dat, so I'm tak a chair. Den 
ah splain to my dear hole pardner of my 
jaw and sorrow — all my great projeck and 
show heem my great henterprise. We will 
hengage in de hen business an sell de pro- 
duck on de City. Ah'll splain to heem also 
dat I hav hevery confidence on dat, and if 
she will tak hole wit me an carridge me 
wit his help and device ah'll give him one- 
fifth de profeet. Juss so quick she see one 
shance for mak sometings she begin for be 
sharp wit me, an she say it was not fair 
for she to don half de work an not get but 
one fifth de pay, den I argu dat I'm furnish 
all the capitle — I own de stock an of course 
can't afford to go snuck even, but I lay low 
for de ole lady, and put a new bait on my 
hook, and ah catch heem de firs trow. I 
tole him I would give him one eighth if he 
will help me, and he was perfeck satisfy 
and she close de trade rat off. Now ah'm 
tole you my skeem, but you mus not tell 
dat — it is not wise for kill de busnis. Firs 
1 went on de barn and find it one ole keg- 
nail and feex straw on hees bottom, half 
full. Nex I'm gon tak 4 dozen haig and 
put i'm on top dat, and pack him all close 
togedder and do good job. Den I'm drive 
all mv flock in de pen — I have 6 good 
one — Coaching Chinaman dey call him — an 
de rooster. All good wan for de sit down 
busnes. So I'm seleck dat one I lak bess 
for dat job — nace hole biddy — an ah mak 
little speech to heem and tell it I hav fine 
little job for 2 tree week mebby — jus 
de sam work lak I do myself. Den I'm 
shoo him all in one corner and put out my 
arm and squat down for catch him and mak 
grab for dat. I'm not suckseed. Dat very 
biddy I want jomp it rat over my hed and 
flop his wing and ron lak I never see be- 
fore. Now what I can do ? I gon call my 
little boy for come dar and bring his dog. 
He like well dat fun too, and we go for 
dat bird somore. Ah'm tell heem my little 
Jo, fer hole his dog and go slow and min 
his eye, and I tell my hen " Sho, Sho, 
biddy; chuck, chuck, he— a — sy now and we 
bote grab again. Dis tam he tak new tic- 
tax and scoot ee'm rat out tween our feets ; 
dat hen do an ron jomp on de fence 
over de pile cordwood and he's crow at me. 



31 



32 



RECREATION. 



Now Ah'm begin to rile it op an Ah'm git 
my wife for come out an go on dat hexcur- 
sion wit me, an I ax heem to breeng his 
beg apron for trow on dat quodruped when 
we get heem. But dat hen she was awful 
scare an me I cant get more close den 4 rod 
to dat. So I'm yell to my boy to let him 
go his dog and de fun begin. Little Jo he 
follow his dog an Ah'm go nex myself an 
behin' me ron my ole woman wit his apron 
all ready. Dat hen he aim strait for de 
cord hood pile. He fin' plentee hole dar. 
Every body cheat me when I bot dat. 
So he crawl trou dar an my dog he have 
no trobble for follow him an tak a nip 
hevery chance he git. An my boy he gone 
tro de same hole an me too by gar an my 
hole woman he's got bout haff way, and she 
can't. 

When shes try for git back she can't too 
an me I can only catch hold his feets an 
pull it out or move de pile so I do dat way. 
But we get close on dat hen an I notis he's 
begin to wobble when he ron an I kno lies 
mos done, for Ah'm chase good many hen 
when Ah'm small boy. So I'm call for tro 
de apron on hees head — (he's got no tail 
now) — an soon he's give op de race an we 
take im. 

Whew dat was more hard work dan saw 
hood. Now when Maam Antoine see de 
keg nail an de hole lot haig — shes mak ob- 
jecktion. Shes tink tirteen is plentee an 
she can sell de ress tarn shes pass on de 
citee. But me I'm kno better. Tirteen was 
a ver onlocky nomber. One tarn im dig tir- 
teen potato on one hill an fore noon nex 
day im loss my jacknife. An one tarn 
Ah'm set tirteen trap for the muskrat wen 



I'm camp wit Jo Gosela an I'm not ever 
fin only leven. Nodder tarn was when I'm 
tak a job for pile slash. I will never for- 
get dat for I finish in jus tirteen day an 
bagosh I'm hev addition on ma familee fore 
is gone one year. So I'm tole my ole lady 
I'm not low no change. 

Den I'm put him dose Biddy on hees ness 
an tell him I'm sorry for him be confine so 
long on his job, but when hes hear tree 
four dozen shicken peep he will feel well 
compensate. But he was mad an will not 
sit down an I was 'bliged for tak string an 
tie him on de kag. Den I tell him, "What 
now you can do?" "Spose you git more 
brain I do aint it?" An dat ole fool he 
stan dar an go Kr-e-a-w, Kr-e-a-w, 
Kre-e--a-w, jus lak he do when weazle gon 
catch heem on hes roost when hes gon 
sleep. An fore he will sit down I am 'blige 
for tak a barrel an turn him over dat keg 
nail and put beeg stone on top — I will show 
dat hen feller I kno more he do enyway. 

Hes bin sit now for 10 day an he git on 
ver content. Yesterday I'm gon broke one 
haig an see if hes mos donne. I'm not gone 
way from home'moch more for I'm hexpect 
hevery day. Now spose you help me for 
mak good sale for dat an put notis on de 
Recreation. Ah'm glad. An lass fall when 
he git ripe I will sell it dose chick just so 
fass as I can tweest his neck, an I will feel 
moch accommodate to you. 

NOTIS. 
For sell it — Tirty five schicken ; Tirteen 
rooster and twenty-five pullit an 1 hen — all 
good one. 50 cent a piece or dollar an half 
for 2. 



A KENTUCKY HOG IN MICHIGAN. 




FRANK OUERBACHER. 



A subscriber sent me a clipping from a 
folder of the Pere Marquette Railroad, 
showing a picture of 48 bass caught by 
one Ouerbacker. Inquiry into the matter 
resulted in the following letter. 

In answer to your question will state 
that 48 small mouth black bass were caught 
at Cunningham's lake, 4 miles from Charle- 
voix, Mich,, between 5 o'clock and dusk 
in the evening and 6 and 9 in the morning. 
At another time at same lake, between 5 
and 10 a. m. I got 233 of the same kind of 
fish. They weigh one to 5 pounds. 

F. S. Ouerbacker, Louisville, Ky. 

You are therefore registered in the swine 
book is fish hog number 1,051. — Editor. 

Hicks : Saw you went home with Sting- 
iman for lunch to-day. What did you get? 

Wicks : An appetite for dinner. — Phila- 
delphia Public Ledger. 



THE AMATEUR TRAPPERS. 



CHARLEY APOPKA. 



II. 



The Trappers camped on Sand lake a 
week, caught several coons, ate many ducks, 
and enjoyed life; but no otter would ven- 
ture into their cunningly concealed traps. 
Every evening they went fishing in the 
mouth of the nearest lagoon, sometimes 
with success, sometimes without, but al- 
ways with satisfaction in one form or an- 
other. One evening Mose went alone, neg- 
lecting to take along the gun, as usual, in 
spite of the protests of Uncle Snap, who 
knew from experience that the greatest op- 
portunities come when the gun is left in 
camp. Foolish Mose, however, only pushed 
off, and was soon among the pads at the 
mouth of the lagoon. A moment more and 
he was trying to establish communication 
with the bass by means of a Bristol rod, 
the valued gift of Recreation's Editor. 
Hearing a noise in the water behind him, 
he looked over his shoulder, and beheld the 
grandfather of otters come out of the water, 
and walk along the shore toward the boat. 
When directly opposite, and not more than 
40 feet away, the otter stopped, looked toward 
Mose, sniffed the air a few times, returned 
to the water, and was soon lost to view. 

While this was taking place, Mose sat 
quietly in the boat, hardly daring to breathe 
for fear of frightening his shy visitor, and 
his thoughts were somewhat as follows : 

"Confound my idiotic picture for not 
bringin' the gun ! Here's the first good 
chance we've had at an otter, and I have to 
sit like a dummy and watch 6 or 8 dollars, 
worth of fur chase itself out into the shad- 
owy future, with nothing to flag it down 
but a fish hook. If I had a kodak, and 
knew how to use it, what a picture I could 
get for Recreation's photo competition !" 

Promising himself never to stir out of 
the tent again without a gun in his hand, 
Mose dejectedly put up his rod, and pad- 
dled back to camp. As he did so the coots 
cackled at him in a most insulting way. 

After supper the adventure was related 
to Uncle Snap, who glared at his careless 
pard a moment, and then burst out : 

"I told y " but suddenly checked him- 
self, realizing that it was by no means an 
original remark he was about to make, and 
contented himself by beating Mose 3 
straight games of casino. 

One evening they packed everything: away 
in the canoes, and the next morning the 
day star saw them on their way, long be- 
fore the sun was up. The river narrowed 
after it left the lake, and ran through a 



great marsh, and a strong current helped 
them on their way. Uncle Snap was in the 
lead, some 50 yards or more, when 2 otters 
swam out from under some willow pushes, 
and started down stream. Uncle Snap put 
all his force on the paddle, and by the time 
the otters reached the opposite bank he was 
close to them. Seizing the gun, he took a 
hurried aim, as they crawled ashore, with 
their heads in line, and fired ; but in his 
hurry he overshot, and the otters plunged 
back again, and were seen no more. 

Coming along behind, Mose, in scanning 
the shores, as was his wont, saw a young 
buck, back from the river some 60 or 70 
yards, standing with his big ears raised and 
his body concealed by the swamp willows. 
He had evidently been lying down, and at 
the report of the gun had jumped to his 
feet, and was trying to decide what was cre- 
ating all the disturbance. Mose grabbed his 
rifle and tried to catch a sight, but the cur- 
rent carried the canoe past the openings 
in the bushes too swiftly. Mose ran ashore, 
softly parted the leaves; and was pleased to 
see the deer still standing like a statue. 
Taking a careful squint through the Ly- 
man sights at the graceful throat, Mose 
pressed the trigger. The buck fell in his 
tracks, as if struck by lightning. The 25 
caliber bullet had done its work, and an- 
other murder of a beautiful, harmless crea- 
ture had been committed. The assassina- 
tion was as justifiable as such deeds often 
are, for there was no fresh meat on hand. 

"Come ashore. I've killed a deer," Mose 
called to Uncle Snap, who was poking about 
on the bottom with his paddle, hopelessly 
trying to find a dead otter, though he knew 
better. 

They bled the deer and dressed it on the 
ground, for the willow bushes would not 
sustain the weight. The buck was large and 
fat, as the marsh deer generally are. 

They took the meat aboard, proceeded on 
their way, and camped that evening on a 
little knoll among the willows. It was not 
long until venison steaks were sizzling in 
the pan, and impatient Trappers snuffed the 
air with watering mouths. 

"This is living," mumbled Uncle Snap, 
with his mouth full of deer meat, and a bis- 
cuit in his paws. "I wouldn't be a vegeta- 
rian for a million dollars." 

He got no reply from Mose, who had been 
told, in his early days, that it was a breach 
of etiquette to talk with his mouth full ; but 
his actions were more eloquent than words. 



33 



34 



RECREATION. 



The men had just time before dark to 
stretch the deer skin, and collect a little 
wood. Then the lantern was lighted, and 
the inevitable game of casino was soon in 
progress. The Amateur Trappers were in- 
veterate drinkers. Their beverage consist- 
ed of -cold water in a quart bottle, with 
enough pure cane syrup to sweeten it right, 
then a few drops of vanilla. After being 
well shaken it would foam like beer, and 
the 2 heathens were foolishly fond of it. 
On the evening in question they played a 
game to see who had to mix the bottle. 
Mose got the short cards. Then they 
played another, to see who drank the first 
half. Uncle Snap won. 

"If I don't win the last half," muttered 
Mose between his teeth, "I am going to tear 
up the whole world." 

Fortunately he won, and the catastrophe 
was averted. 

The following day they found a little 
otter sign, and set a few traps. The knoll 
was infested with swamp rabbits, and after 
dark their queer little belching cries could 
be heard in all directions. The bones were 
cut out of the venison hams, and they were 
salted, and hung every evening in the smoke 
of the camp fire. In 4 or 5 days they were 
well cured, and steaks cut trom them were 
much more tender than when fresh. 

The Trappers stayed at the deer camp 
several days without taking any furs, but 
the fishing was of the best. Across the 
river opened the mouth of a lagoon, and a 
few casts there with a spinner, , about sun- 
set, were sure to result in a boiling of the 
water, and a singing of the reel, enough to 
bring back life to a mummy. The bass 
were large, 5, 6, and 8 pounds being noth- 
ing unusual. Of course the largest ones got 
away, but it was not the fault of the little 
Bristol rod. 

The men fished until they caught, the size 
they wanted, putting the others back. Uncle 
Snap was at the paddle and Mose standing 
in the bow of the little "Get There," manip- 
ulated the rod. He cast the spoon into a 
little reach of open water, reddened by the 
setting sun, and worked it along in a series 
of zigzags, close to the border of lily pads. 
Suddenly there was a commotion. The 
water boiled, miniature whirlpools formed, 
and the spoon hook departed for scenes un- 
known, encouraged on its way by the joyful 
screaming of the reel. 

"Ouch !" yelled Mose, as he burnt his 
thumb, braking the line. 

"Hold, 'im, hold 'im !" shouted Uncle 
Snnp, dropping his paddle in the excitement. 

"Get us into open water, quick," said his 
pard, who had finally checked the rush ; but 
great bends of perspiration and anxiety be- 
dewed his noble brow, for the outfit was in 
a narrow channel in the field of pads, and 
it was 50 yards to the open safety of the 



river. Desperately Uncle Snap strained to 
back the boat to safety, but all in vain. 
The little rod bent double, the reel gave a 
short, despairing "zee-e," the nearest bunch 
of lily pads was violently convulsed a mo- 
ment, and then Mose sank dejectedly into 
the bottom of the boat. 

"Gosh," was all he said. Uncle Snap 
gazed with pity on his prostrate friend, al- 
though his own heart was nearly broken. 

As they untangled the spoon from the 
lily stems, and paddled across to camp, they 
discussed the fish, its size, strength, etc. ' 

"Did you see its side when it broached 
the first time? It looked 3 feet long. I 
could see the streak along its side." 

"When it opened its mouth that time to 
shake out the hook, I could have thrown 
, my- hat down its throat." 

"Its tail was like this paddle blade." 

These and like remarks were exchanged 
paddling back to camp, but the regret of 
the Trappers was lessened as they realized 
they had no use for the escaped monster, 
for 2 big bass lay in the bottom of the boat 
awaiting the knife. The Trappers fried the 
fish and ate supper as the streak of red in 
the West faded gradually to blackness and 
the swamp rabbits began to play about and 
work off their queer little vocal efforts. 

Early the next morning the Trappers left 
the deer camp, and paddled nearly all day 
before they found a place that suited them. 
The spot finally selected was under a great 
live oak, thickly hung with moss, growing 
on a dry, sandy ridge, surrounded by wil- 
low and saw grass swamp on all but the 
river side. This camp site was on a blind 
channel, a -quarter of a mile off the main 
stream, out of the track of river travel. 

Fresh otter sign was found on the shores 
near, so the men went to work, and put up 
a comfortable camp under the great oak. 
It was a pretty spot, and the A. T.'s sur- 
veyed their little canvas-roofed home with 
great satisfaction. They finished by sun- 
set, and jumping into the canoe, started for 
a likely looking place for a bass, a short 
distance down stream. They were just get- 
ting the rod together when, with a great 
roar of wings, and musical chattering, an 
immense flock of rice birds passed close 
overhead, making for their roosting place 
in the swamp. Seizing the gun, which, 
since the otter episode, was never left be- 
hind, Uncle Snap blazed into the thick mass 
of birds, and 22 plump little brown balls 
descended into the river, their companions 
continuing on their way, without apparently 
noticing the misfortune of their fellows. 

Putting up the rod again, the Trapners 
gathered up the game, and in half an hour 
the birds were ready for the fire. Uncle 
Snap built up a big blaze of dead oak limbs, 
while Mose cut 2 wallow switches of the 
proper size, and after carefully salting the 



OLD MAN STlCE'S EXPERIENCE WITH THE BEAR. 



35 



birds they impaled them on the switches, 
II on each. 

The fire had by that time made a 
bed of coals, and each trapper propped his 
stick of birds over them to broil to his lik- 
ing. Then each, with a slice of bacon on 
another stick, broiled it likewise, basting the 
birds with the appetizing bacon fat as it 
dripped from the heat of the coals. 



"I can't stand that smell much longer," 
said Mose, swallowing a time or 2, to Uncle 
Snap, who was evidently restraining him- 
self with great difficulty from snatching his 
partly cooked birds off the fire. Ten min- 
utes more^ and the hungry Trappers were 
reclining on their bed of moss, feasting as 
only those who are close to nature can 
feast. 



OLD MAN STICK'S EXPERIENCE WITH THE BEAR. 



W. F. SHORT, JR. 



Two strolling Russians leading 2 big cin- 
namon bears had passed through town giv- 
ing exhibitions. The bears were taught to 
perform all the tricks in the bear manual, 
such as dancing, climbing telegraph poles, 
and so on, but the coup de grace was a 
wrestling match between one of the bears 
and one of the men. It was a. catch-as- 
catch-can affair, and just before the con- 
test the other Russian would pass among 
the crowd holding his cap in a receptive 
manner, saying in his broken accent, "Evly 
body chippy in, an' see de man rascal wid 
de bear." 

We had just been witnessing one of 
these exhibitions and had adjourned to the 
• usual place, when we were joined by old 
man Stice. Some o'ne asked the old man 
if he had seen the dancing bears. He said 
he had, and we gathered from his subse- 
quent remarks that he did not entertain a 
high opinion of the outfit. 

"Thar used to be a good many bear 
'round our parts," said the old man, "an' 
once when harves' wuz over an' we hed 
spare time on our han's, Seth Perkins an' 
me laid out to go up ifi the mountains fer 
; a week or 10 days an' hev a bear hunt. 
We tuk along, besides our blankets, some 
pertaters an' a side of hog meat, an' the 
folks made us a hull sack of beat biskits. 
Of course, we figgered on gittin' plenty of 
game, so we didn't anticipate thet we'd 
perish for want of vittles. We got ole Sep 
Wilkins to take his team an' haul us up to 
whar we proposed campin'. The place wuz 
clean up in the mountains, nigh onto 25 
or 30 mile from the nearest civilization, 
an' wuz the wildest kentry I ever see. The 
timber wuz so heavy an' the leaves so 
many thet the sun couldn't shine through, 
an' the underbresh wuz thet thick a man 
couldn't hardly git over the ground. 

"Seth an' me hed been trampin' all day, 
but hed see no signs of bear, an' night 
comin' on we set out to go back to camp, 



so tired we wuz plum beat out. Thar wuz 
plenty of other game to shoot at, but we 
didn't want it. Nothin' would suit me an' 
Seth but jist bear. As we wuz a-trudgin' 
'long an' talkin' 'bout what we wuz to hev 
fer supper, we heerd a noise, an' 'lookin' 
up, by cracky ! if thar warn't the all- 
firedest, bigges' grizzly bear thet wuz ever 
born'd, standin' right acrost our path, 
shakin' his head an' lookin' as hungry as 
we wuz. Well, maybe me an' Seth lost 
some time a tearin' „ outen thar, bat its 
more'n likely we didn't. Seth, he went 
one way an' me another, an' ole griz 
seemin' to prefer my comp'ny to Seth's, 
tuk arter me. 

"I run up a alley, an' when I hed gone 
'bout 4 blocks, as near as I can ricolect 
now, I come to a high board fence standin' 
acrost the allev, an' which I couldn't git 
over. The bear wuz comin' right at me 
with his mouth wide open, as I could see 
by the glare of the 'lectric light, an' I 
could see the water drippin' from his 
gleamin' jaws. I heerd his big feet shufflirr* 
over the pavement, an' every time he set 
'em down his claws would scratch on 
the bricks with a raspin' sound thet 
fairly made my flesh look like a gooses's 
skin. 

"Strange what leetle fool things comes 
into a man's head in times of danger, an r 
even when his life is in peril he'll take 
notice of somethin' what hez no bearin' 
on the case. Now when I see griz comin' 
at me with his mouth open an' wearin' a 
menacin' air, I observed he'd lost one of 
his front teeth an' I wondered how he'd 
done it. 

"I never lost my presence of mind fer a 
instant, howsumever, an' when the bear 
comes up to me a-rarin' on his hin' legs, I 
jest runs my arm down his ole throat, 
turns him wrong side out an' he went the 
other way." 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



The man who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a reai sportsman. 



SOME FLIMSY EXCUSES. 

In reply to your criticism in August 
Recreation of the killing of 1,700 ducks 
by our party last fall, I would say that 
your ideas and mine, concerning the object 
of trips for sport, do not agree. You ask 
what legitimate use a man could make of 
170 ducks during one hunting season, as 
he could only eat 3 a day or 30 in 10 days. 
I take from this that your idea of sport is 
that a man should not hunt- ducks until he 
is hungry and then not kill more than he 
can eat. In other words he should hunt 
ducks only to satisfy his stomach. This is 
far from the fact in our case, as we had 
supplied our larder with $250 worth of 
stuff that our stomachs yearned for and 
really had not thought much about ducks 
as food. 

What did we do with the surplus of 
ducks ? We gave many of them to the 
pioneer settlers of this uncivilized country 
who, as a rule, are not equipped for ob- 
taining ducks for their food and with whom 
the gaining of food in sufficient quantity is 
quite a problem. Then we have in DulutH 
a great many neighbors and some friends 
who like ducks as food and who, owing to 
circumstances over which they had no con- 
trol, can not go hunting and, as our laws 
do not allow the selling of game of any' 
description, they would go hungry for game 
if it was not for the generous disposition 
of sportsmen who bring home their sur- 
plus and divide it with their neighbors. 
Such was the method of disposing of the 
seemingly large amount of game killed or, 
as you put it, slaughtered. 
, I infer that you are of opinion that wild 
ducks are becoming scarce. I do not be- 
lieve such is the case. I have been hunt- 
ing ducks 35 years and from my experi- 
ence I believe they are just as plentiful as 
they ever have been during this time. It is 
true that in some localities they have dis- 
appeared, but that is due to natural causes, 
such as lack of food and the results of 
civilization. They have changed their 
haunts and their course of flight, but that 
is all. I have never seen them more plenti- 
ful in any country than they were last year 
in Minnesota. 

The few ducks that are killed in their 
flight each fall do not amount to much. 
In my opinion man does not destroy the 
life of 5 per cent, of the annual hatching. 
Birds and beasts of prey are responsible for 
10 times as much destruction of duck life 
as man is. Another source of great destruc- 
tion is the persistent shooting during the 
winter months in our Atlantic and Southern 



sea coast countries, where game protec- 
tion is unknown, or where laws are not 
enforced. In those States they not only 
shoot but they net birds by the thousands. 
Then there are the Central and South Amer- 
ican countries, without any game laws, 
where our Northern bred ducks spend a 
good portion of their winter. This I had 
demonstrated to my satisfaction a few 
winters ago during a trip to the West In- 
dies and South America. A few years ago 
I read an article in one of our magazines 
in which a traveler in the Yukon country 
described what he saw there. Alaska and 
the Hudson Bay country are the chief 
breeding grounds of our wild fowl. This 
writer, whose name I have forgotten, said 
one could walk miles through the marshes 
of the Yukon stepping on goose nests at 
every stride and that the air was continu- 
ally filled with the flight of the alarmed 
fowls. According to this authority com- 
panies are incorporated and thousands of, 
dollars invested in their plants for collect- 
ing the eggs of these game birds for the 
albumen of commerce. Herein lies the 
greatest danger to our game fowls. Mil- 
lions of eggs are destroyed by these com- 
mercialists and there is where game pro- 
tecting laws should be made to operate. 
By legislation prohibiting such wanton de- 
struction of the hatching grounds of the 
ducks we could get to the bottom of the 
trouble. Our Congress should be prevailed 
on to enact laws that would put an end to 
the business of these companies and it 
would do more for the" propagation of our 
wild ducks and geese than the combined 
legislation of all the States of America. 
W. H. Magie, M.D., Duluth, Minn. 



ANSWER. 



What Dr. Magie does not know about 
wild ducks and geese would fill a bigger 
book than Webster's International Diction- 
ary. He hatches up that old fake story 
about the collecting of ducks' eggs in 
Alaska and making albumen from them. 
The falsity of that story has been exposed 
time and again by such naturalists as Drs. 
Palmer and Fisher, of the Agricultural De- 
partment, Mr. W. T. Hornaday, Director of 
the New York Zoological Society, and half 
a dozen others of almost equal prominence. 
Still, Dr. Magie comes up and says that 
"Companies are incorporated and thousands 
of dollars invested in their plants for col- 
lecting the eggs of these game birds for 
the albumen of commerce. . . . Millions 
of eggs are destroyed by these commercial- 
ists." 



36 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



37 



There is not a man in Alaska engaged in 
shipping duck or goose eggs out of that 
territory, to say nothing of incorporated 
companies. We have rigid federal laws 
prohibiting the taking of the eggs of ducks 
or geese in Alaska, or the shipment thereof 
out of that territory. We also have a law 
prohibiting the importation of such eggs 
from Canada. These laws have been in 
effect for years and are rigidly enforced. 
Yet the Doctor has not found it out. 

The story about the traveler in the 
Yukon country being able to walk miles 
on duck and goose nests is of the same 
character as the albumen story. 

The Doctor says he believes wild ducks 
are just as plentiful as they were 35 years 
ago. If he really believes that, his ignor- 
ance is simply pitiful. There may be lim- 
ited areas in which ducks still congregate 
in their Northern and Southern flights, in 
nearly as large numbers as ever, but I 
doubt it, and so does every other close ob- 
server. We all know there are olaces 
where good shooting can still be had every 
fall, but we also know there are thou- 
sands of square miles on this continent 
that were formerly visited by millions of 
wild ducks every fall, where none are ever 
seen now. 

We all know the prices of wild ducks in 
the markets have advanced within the past 
20 years from $2 or $3 a dozen, to $10 to $15 
a dozen, or even $30 a dozen. Canvasbacks 
now sell in the New York market at $45 
to $60 a dozen, whereas 20 years ago they 
could be bought for $3 to $4 a dozen. Why 
this advance in prices if the birds are not 
decreasing in numbers? There are 4 or 5 
times as many men shooting for the mar- 
ket to-day as there were 20 years ago. 

If Dr. Magie will read the article on page 
322 of April Recreation, copy of which I 
have sent him by mail, and then investi- 
gate carefully the statements made therein, 
he will know a good deal more about the 
decrease of ducks in this country than he 
does now. 

The Doctor further says, "The few ducks 
that are killed in their flight each fall over 
our continent do not amount to much." 

How about the 2 men who were convict- 
ed a few months ago for having in their 
possession over 20,000 ducks that were 
killed on one lake in his State? Does this 
not amount to much? And this is only one 
case in thousands. There are a number of 
large commission houses in various cities 
that employ hunters by the year to follow 
ducks and geese from the time they cross 
the Canadian border in September until they 
cross back again on their Northern flight 
in spring, to kill all the birds possible every 
day and ship them to their employers. Does 
this not amount to much? 

There are over 400 market hunters on 



the Virginia and North Carolina coast who 
make their living hunting wild fowl. Does 
this not amount to much? 

If Dr. Magie will come to New York, I 
can take him through the markets in this 
city any day during the open season for the 
sale of game, and can show him in the 
aggregate many carloads of ducks and 
geese on sale. Does this not amount to 
much ? 

The Doctor's conclusion that the great 
slaughter of ducks takes place in Mexico 
and Central America is simply absurd. 
The weather is hot there even during our 
winter months. The natives of those re- 
gions are not hunters and our American 
market hunters rarely follow the game into 
those countries. The cost of transportation 
and icing from that region to the markets 
in the States would be prohibitive, and it 
is a well known fact that few, if any, ducks 
ever come from those countries into North- 
ern markets. 

A great many ducks are killed in Mexico 
and shipped North, but the great destruc- 
tion that has been carried on by such 
men as Dr. Magie, and has occurred dur- 
ing the past 25 years is the cause of the 
diminution of our wild fowl. 

If Dr. Magie had been reading Recreation 
during the past 10 years as he should have 
been, he would scarcely have made the 
pitiful excuses he _does make for the 
slaughter committed by himself and friends. 
Similar excuses have often been made by 
game hogs who have been rebuked in these 
pages. Yet the Doctor says, "We gave 
many to the pioneer settlers of this un- 
civilized country, who, as a rule, are not 
equipped for obtaining ducks for their 
food." The hunting which Dr. Magie is 
trying to apologize for was done in the 
Bowstring country of Minnesota. In the 
annual meeting of the L. A. S., at Colum- 
bus, O., last February, Sam Fullerton said 
someone had spoken to him about the peo- 
ple of Mnnnesota being only half civilized 
and everybody laughed. Now Dr. Magie 
refers to the good citizens of the Bowstring 
country as being uncivilized, and it wouhi 
seem that the laugh is on him. 

I have rarely heard of any man claiming 
that the settlers in any game country need- 
ed to be supplied with game by visiting 
sportsmen. On the other hand, thousands 
of reports from such sportsmen have been 
printed in the various sportsmen's jour- 
nals, complaining that the greatest destruc- 
tion of game was always to be charged to 
these same farmers or woodsmen, as the 
case may be. You can always trust a farm- 
er or his boys to get all the game that is 
coming to them, in season and out of sea- 
son, and Dr. Magie's excuse that he and his 
friends fed the natives on ducks, is there- 
fore exceedingly lame. 



38 



RECREATION. 



Then the Doctor tells about giving away 
a lot more of the surplus to people in 
Duluth. This excuse is threadbare; worse 
than that, it has holes in it. The man who 
goes into the country and hogs game as 
long as he can find it, always sneaks out 
when accused, by saying that he gave the 
game away to friends, or others. Why 
should not the Doctor and his friends be 
manly enough to say that they went to the 
lakes to slaughter game as long as they 
could find it ; that they then gave the game 
away rather than let it rot. But for Heav- 
en's sake, Doctor, never try to justify your- 
self and your crowd for having butchered 
1,700 ducks by claiming you did it in order 
-to feed the uncivilized natives, your neigh- 
bors in Duluth. 

What do the readers of Recreation 
think of this Duluth crowd? — Editor. 



SHUT OUT FOREIGN BIRD BUTCHERS. 

Pennsylvania has a section in her game 
laws which requires unnaturalized foreign 
born residents of that State to take out 
licenses before they can legally hunt in the 
State. Here is the text of the law : 

Be it enacted, etc. : That from and after 
the passage of this act every non-resident 
and every unnaturalized foreign born resi- 
dent of this Commonwealth shall be re- 
quired to take out a license from the treas- 
urer of the county in which he proposes to 
hunt, before beginning to hunt in any part 
of the Commonwealth. Each and every 
person not a resident of this Common- 
wealth, and each and every person who is 
an unnaturalized foreign born resident of 
this Commonwealth, shall pay a license fee 
of $10 to the treasurer of the county in 
which he proposes to hunt, and the said 
treasurer shall thereupon issue to him a 
certificate, on forms supplied by the board 
of Game Commissioners of this Common- 
wealth, bearing the name and place of resi- 
dence of the applicant, with his descrip- 
tion, as near as may be, which said certifi- 
cate shall authorize the owner to hunt and 
kill game in any part of this Common- 
wealth, during the period of that year when 
game 'may be legally killed, under the re- 
strictions and for the purposes allowed by 
law. Said certificate shall not be transfer- 
able, and shall be exposed for examination 
on demand made by any game protector, 
constable or game warden of the State. 
One-h*tlf of the license fee so received by 
any county treasurer shall be retained by 
him for the use of- the county wherein the 
same is paid, and the remaining one-half of 
said fee shall be forwarded by him to the 
Stale treasurer. 

All States and Territories should enact 
similar provisions. The uneducated foreign- 



ers are the worst destroyers of song and in- 
sectivorous birds in this country. They have 
no sentiment as to the beauty of birds and 
no sense of their value to the community. 
When such people go out with guns they 
kill every living thing they can find, put 
all into the pot together, cook and eat them. 
The Pennsylvania law works admirably. 
There are few of these foreign laborers 
who are willing to pay $10 a year for the 
privilege of hunting, and the consequence 
is that few of them now go into the woods 
with guns, in that State. All friends of 
game protection should therefore urge on 
their law makers the necessity of incor- 
porating the foregoing into their game, laws, 
at the earliest possible date. 



LOCAL CONDITIONS NO EXCUSE FOR 
SLAUGHTER. 

I have seen your comment in September 
Recreation on what you consider my hog- 
ishness in killing 54 ducks in 3 hours last 
year and, without the slightest personal 
feeling in the matter, I write you these few 
lines. 

I do not wQnder that so much effort is 
wasted by game protective associations 
when they make such foolish remarks and 
display such a lack of knowledge as is 
shown in your comment ; it simply keeps 
people who understand the different local 
conditions from taking any interest in such 
matters. If you had written for particu- 
lars, as I fully expected you to do when I 
answered your inquiry, I should have tried 
to give you the material for an interesting 
story. You asked nothing about the local 
conditions of our. season, how many times 
a year we shoot ducks, how many were 
in the party, how many times we went out 
on the ice before we' struck the ducks, 
how many we might have.killed if we had 
staid out the full 7 hours of tide, nor what 
the other 6 boats got that went out the same 
day and tried to get the 54 ducks that fell 
to us. Neither did you ask what became of 
the ducks, whether they were sold or given 
to people who needed them. As to my 
reading no good literature, I must disagree 
with you as I take Recreation regularly 
and think it fairly good. 

H. C. Clark, Delaware City, Del. 

ANSWER. 

I am glad to know you take so practical 
and sensible a view of my criticism. The 
details of your hunting trip might have 
proved interesting, but whatever they might 
have been they would not excuse the kill- 
ing of so large a number of ducks in one 
day. To the real sportsman the killing 
of game is only an incident of a day in the 
field or on the water. We can all recall 
many a day when we did not get a shot as 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



39 



among the most enjoyable. I have been 
all through the mill. I have encountered 
ice, snow, sleet, and nearly all the other 
conditions that come to a shooter on land 
or on water, and I know what I am talking 
about. No matter if a man hunts or sits 
in a blind without getting a shot for 10 
days he should be glad to quit on the nth 
day if he gets 25 birds. You have, no 
doubt, read many letters of sportsmen treat- 
ing of this subject and believing as I do. 

You have doubtless read many replies to 
criticisms, from men who have tried to ex- 
cuse themselves by explaining that they 
gave the game to friends. While this is 
an excuse for the killing it is not a good 
reason. This subject has been threshed out 
in Recreation time and again and the 
fallacy of such excuses has been thoroughly 
ventilated. — Editor. 



THE CIRCLE HUNTS OF THE WESTERN 
RESERVE. 

In a recent number of Recreation I saw 
an account of a neighborhood hunt or deer 
drive once common in this part of the 
Western Reserve. Had I undertaken the 
task 20 or even 10 years ago I could have 
collected much information regarding such 
hunts from actual participants, for this 
county of Portage, Ohio, was once the heart 
of the best deer territory in the world. 
Deer 'drives took place each fall and every 
settler within a day's travel was expected 
to attend. The portion of forest, 5 to 10 
miles square, selected for the drive was 
marked by blazing trees along the sides 
of the strip. Near the center a large circle 
called the firing line, was blazed. The 
hunters in 4 squads, each under a captain, 
were stationed at the sides of the square 
and at a signal advanced toward the inner 
circle'. No one was allowed to shoot until 
the circle was reached. 

There the deer and other animals caught 
between the advancing lines found them- 
selves penned within a ring of men stand- 
ing almost shoulder to shoulder. Occasion- 
ally a bear or wolf would break the line and 
escape, but the poor deer, lacking cour- 
age to attack the hunters milled around in 
the circle until the last one was killed. 
All game taken was divided equally among 
those present. The hunt was followed by 
an open air feast, which sometimes degener- 
ated into an orgy. 

Now the old hunters have gone their 
way, unconscious of having merited the 
maledictions of their descendants. To 
them, doubtless, game seemed inexhaustible 
and they depended largely on it for food. 
There remains alive, in this vicinity at 
least, but one man who took part in the 
great game slaughters once considered the 



acme of sport in this region. At the age 
of 98, he still tells the story of the great 
hunt of 1822 in which over 500 deer were 
killed. 

One can imagine the abundance of game 
in those days when so many deer could be 
corralled in one township. As the country 
became settled and game decreased men 
came to realize the folly of this annual 
slaughter, and the last circle hunt ever 
attempted in Portage county was frustrated 
by a number of disgusted hunters who 
opened their part of the line and permitted 
the deer to escape. That was before I be- 
gan to hunt, though I am 77, but I can 
remember hearing my older brothers talk 
about it when they came home. 

A. H. Parsons, Ravenna, O. 



WESTERN MAN SHOULD WAKEN UP. 

Will you have space in Recreation for a 
request for the names and addresses of 
sportsmen and others who are in favor of 
a statutory clause prohibiting the sale of 
any game bird in the States occupied by 
your various readers, under heavy penalty? 

If enough signatures can be secured, 
steps will be taken to have the clause em- 
bodied in the various State game laws. I 
hope your readers will be in favor of this 
clause, so that the slaughter and ruthless 
destruction of the game birds may be 
stopped. 

L. R., Denver, Colo. 

For 10 years past I have been giving a 
great deal of space in Recreation to the 
advocacy of laws prohibiting the sale of 
game in the various States, and this is one 
of the primary objects for which the League 
of American Sportsmen was organized and 
which now has over 10,000 members. I 
have spent three-fourths of my time during 
the past 6 years, and more than $15,000 of 
my money, in working for the passage of 
laws in the various States prohibiting the 
sale of game, and in endeavoring to pre- 
serve it. As a result there are to-day 24 
States that have laws prohibiting the sale of 
certain kinds of game. Eight of these pro- 
hibit the killing of game at any time for 
.gale, and Idaho, Kansas and Montana pro- 
hibit the salfe of all game at all times. It 
seems, therefore, that you are rather late 
coming into the field with your proposition. 

You should join this League at once and 
help in the great work it is doing. We hope 
in time to have laws in all the States pro- 
hibiting the sale of game and you should get 
in the procession at once. — Editor. 



SOUTHERN MONTANA BIGHORN. 

In the fall of 1889 my brother, another 
young man and I set out for Albert Young's 



40 



RECREATION. 



cow camp, near the head of Big Sheep creek. 

The canyon through which Big Sheep 
creek runs is rough and the mountain trails 
are hard traveling. 

As we were about to leave the canyon 
to make our journey across the barren 1 
saw, high up on the mountain, a bunch of 
bighorn sheep. In order to fool them we 
rode on as if we had not seen them, but in 
a few minutes we rode back, went down 
the canyon and tied our horses. Then we 
commenced the high, steep climb which had 
to be made to get to our game. We finally 
gained a point from which we had a grand 
view of the big fellows. There were 17. 

I brought my rifle to my shoulder, took 
a careful aim and the sheep with the largest 
horns fell backward, rolling and tumbling 
down the mountain. By the time he was 
fairly dead I got 2 more. Thinking I had 
killed already too many, I watched the 
other boys until the sheep were out of 
sight. 

It was growing dark, but we had to drag 
our game down a canyon to where we 
could hang it in some trees. That done, 
we went to our horses and continued toward 
the cow camp. 

After visiting a few days and watching 
the boys break bronchos and brand calves, 
w r e again left for home by the way of our 
game, which was all right. We packed it 
on our ponies and reached home just be- 
fore dusk. 

John Patterson, Dell, Mont. 



DEPENDS ON THE SEASON. 

Since boyhood I have been an ardent 
lover of hunting, and as I have always lived 
in the heart of one of the best game coun- 
tries in America, I have had every facility 
for studying the habits of some of our big 
game and fur-bearing animals. 

Some hunters contend that a moose will 
not come to a call, others maintaining he 
can be called up at any time. A long life- 
time in the woods enables me to state that 
both claims are wrong. For about 2 weeks 
in the rutting season moose and caribou 
throw all their natural caution to the winds 
and will come to a call. In fact, I have 
known them to interview a man chopping 
wood. 

After the close of the rutting season 
they will not pay the slightest attention to 
any call. 

Some hunters claim that a moose will not 
attack a man without provocation. Another 
fallacy, as I know from experience. Let 
no hunter feel secure under the impression 
that a bull moose, in the rutting season, will 
not go for anything in sight, if he happens 
to be out for trouble. 

The caribou, on the contrary, is the most 
stupid of animals until he scents you or 



hears you, which puts him on his mettle. 
Then it is almost impossible to get near 
him. If you stand still when there is no 
wind he will walk up within 10 feet of 
you. They will not believe their eyes un- 
less you move. 

W. S. Crooker, South Brookfield, N. S. 



GAME NOTES. 

, I wonder if any of your thousands of 
,' readers have ever thought of Cuba as a 
cattle country, and of the immense profits 
that may be made in this line of business 
if properly conducted and with sufficient 
capital ; to say nothing of ranch life, which 
is capable of restoring a dead man to life. 

I am in the cattle business and every day 
become more interested in it. I should like 
to correspond privately with readers of 
Recreation, especially cattlemen, on this 
matter. Our correspondence might prove 
of mutual benefit. 

We have excellent hunting here ov, deer, 
wild boars, etc. 

Recreation is doing effective work. Kill 
the hogs ! Do not thin out the herd, but 
exterminate it completely. 

O. A. Fischer, Trinidad, Cuba. 



It now behooves the L. A. S. to please 
crows. Seriously note that I do not say ex- 
crows. Please note that I do not say ex- 
terminate them, but thin them out. You, 
no doubt, are better informed than I as to 
the magnitude of their depredations, so I 
will say nothing further than that I have 
watched some of them at their nefarious 
work and realize something must be done 
soon or between the crows and the human 
game hogs our song and game birds will 
soon be as scarce everywhere as they al- 
ready have become in "some districts. A 
bount3 r of 5 cents a head would set the 
youngsters to work with their 22's. 

O. B. Coe, Jr., Boston, Mass. 



Herewith I enclose money order for $1 
for which please send Recreation to me 
another year. I like to read it better than 
any other maerazine published. I like the 
way you roast the bristlebacks. It is doing 
them good. 

Game was scarce here last season. Prai- 
rie chickens and ducks are almost gone. I 
was out hunting 4 times one month and only 
killed 2 chickens and 2 ducks. I only saw 
one quail last season. I have lived in Min- 
nesota and South Dakota 30 years and I 
never saw game so scarce as it was last 



season. 



H. F. Hunter, Jackson, Minn. 



I have lived many years on a ranch in 
the West, and have hunted over a great 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



41 



deal of territory in quest of all sorts of 
game. It is the grandest sport in the 
world, and an enjoyable hunting trip can 
not be gauged by the quantity of game 
killed. Small game is unusually scarce 
here this year, and I never saw so many 
hunters. 

Recreation is doing a good work in edu- 
cating the reckless and thuoghtless slayers 
of game and fish. I have been trying' some 
years to stay illegal shooting of song birds 
and have been able to do some good. 

Dr. J. Bee, Johnstown, Pa. 



hereafter and let some other fellow do the 
hunting. 



The organization of the Benwood Hunt- 
ing and Fishing Club has been accom- 
plished, and the members number among 
the best citizens and business men of Ben- 
wood. Their ground is located on the 
South branch of Cheat river, bought for 
the purpose by Frank W. Porterfield and 
Louis Gocke. The region abounds with all 
manner of small game and a few deer. At 
a recent meeting of the members the fol- 
lowing officers were elected : President, 
Joseph Mahood ; secretary, Thomas P. 
Deegan ; treasurer, F. W. Porterfield. 

L. P., Wheeling, W. Va. 



Last year we had excellent quail shoot- 
ing. Actually thousands of Mexican top- 
knot quail passed through town, drifting 
South. These birds always winter around 
ranches, becoming tame enough to feed 
with chickens in bad weather. We had a 
great many ducks last fall, but nearly all 
our rabbits froze in a big snow winter be- 
fore last. Curle.ws are plentiful, and make 
pretty fajr shooting in a prairie country 
like this. 

Herman J. Love, Clayton,. N. M. 



A few of us recently spent 2 weeks on 
Mt. Horeb, where plenty of deer, bear, 
grouse and the finest huckleberries that 
grow are found. The coldest spring water 
that a thirsty man could wish for flows in 
a steady stream from the side of a large 
boulder on the top of the mountain. At the 
base of the mountain is Elk Horn creek, 
where an angler can catch as many big 
trout as he desires. 

U. S. Rider, Salem, Ore. 



Edmund Effers, of this city, a traveling 
salesman, killed a deer and a meadow lark 
in Connecticut in September last, and when 
he was taken into court the Justice charged 
him $100 for the deer and $10 for the lark. 
Edmund served a week in jail before the 
case came to trial so that he had ample 
time to repent of his sins. If he saw fit. 
He would much better stick to his samples 



Charles Horning, a farmer living near 
Tacoma, Wash., was recently arrested by 
Officers Peterson and Foster charged with 
killing a grouse and a quail in close season, 
and was taken into court where he was re- 
quired to pay the penalty imposed by the 
law. It is said that a number of Homing's 
neighbors have been violating the game 
laws for months past and it is hoped this 
hint may do them some good as well as 
him. 



A party of Minneapolis shooters went out 
and made a big killing of ducks. They 
strung them up, had them photographed 
and furnished a cony of the picture to the 
Minneapolis Sunday Times, in which it 
was published. For some reason the men 
do not show up in the picture themselves. 
Can any one guess why? 



I mail you to-day copy of a local paper, 
which tells what we are doing with the 
wolves out here. Each wolf killed means 
at least one covey more of chickens, ducks 
or ruffed grouse. Wolves are strong for- 
agers, especially an old female with a litter 
of young to feed. 

C. W. Virgin, Sauk Centre, Minn. 



There are over 300 regular market hunt- 
ers here, not to speak of local citizens who 
sell their fish and game. 

Dr. C. K. Parker, Pollock, La. 

And it is safe to say at least 290 of them 
use pump guns. — Editor. 



Our game is none too plentiful. Last 
winter quails died in great numbers here 
and I am afraid we shall not have many 
next season. I fed one covey and it came 
through all right. 

Wilfred Wheeler, Concord, Mass. 



I want a gun more for the pleasure of 
having it than for actual use, for I would 
rather see a squirrel or a bird alive and 
happy than to see it dead or dying. 

Ira D. Goodhue, Norwalk, O. 



Deer are again plentiful here, for the 
reason that our local wardens have been 
vigilant in enforcing the anti-hounding law. 
Leon L. Smart, Westport, Pa. 



John E. Sibley, of Gardner, shot 3 coons 
one night last fall near Rindge, N. H. 

S. A. M., Gardner, Mass. 



FTSH AND FISHING. 



LEFT IxN THE PERKIOMEN. 

I had been working hard and was be- 
ginning to feel that a day's vacation was 
due me, so when a friend at Oaks, Pa., called 
me over the telephone and said that the 
water in Perkiomen creek was just right 
for bass fishing I was willing to . believe 
him, though it was near the end of October. 

The gray clawn of the following day found 
me in the lane leading to Keyser's mill, be- 
low which the Perkiomen tumbles noisily 
down its rocky cliannel. It was barely day- 
light when I- stopped to rest under the 
grand old maple by the creek side. As I 
put my tackle together I recalled many de- 
lightful summer noons when I had eaten 
lunch under the big m tree, just as Uncle 
Thad Norris used to do at Jim Henry's, on 
the Broadhead. The wooded hills were 
gorgeous in their Indian summer finery. At 
their summits, the frost-painted, ice-var- 
nished leaves fairly blazed with color in the 
first rays of the sun. The mere memory of 
such a morning is enough to blighten the 
gloomiest of winter days. 

The Peikiomen is full of pools, afford- 
ing excellent fishing during summer. In 
October and November bass desert the 
pools and seek wide, deep water. After 
catching bait with a minnow trap, I 
went down stream, passing many pools 
where, earlier in the season, I had taken big, 
fish. I waded down the creek until noon, 
casting only in deep water, without getting 
a strike. At last I came to what is known 
to anglers thereabouts as the "Red bank. 
There the stream is deep and widens into 
almost a pond. I fished the bank unsuccess- 
fully until late in the afternoon. The de- 
lightful weather amply offset my empty 
creel ; but I was becoming convinced that 
the season was too far advanced for bass 
fishing. 

I was about to give up when my reel 
screamed, and my rod bent to the tug of a 
bass that I at once realized was the largest 
I had ever fastened. The great fish went 
off with a dash that made my blood tingle. 
It took every ounce of stuff in my tackle to 
stop him. Checked in one direction, he tried 
another, and it was not until a 20 minute 
fight had exhausted his strength that I 
could get him near me. Twice I almost 
had him. The third time my fingers were 
fairly in his gills when, with a mightv 
splash, he freed himself from the hook and 
was gone. 

I stood gazing blankly at my straightened 
hook, unable to realize what had happened. 
To think I had had that monster — a 6 
pounder, if an ounce — actually in my hand, 
and yet he had escaped ! I waded ashore 



and wiped the perspiration from my stream- 
ing face, in a transport of disgust. 

But as I walked across the darkening 
fields, toward the little station at Oaks, I 
was ready to forgive the bass for his too 
gallant fight. I knew I had had at least a 
rare day's recreation and an experience 
that I shall treasure while memory lasts. 
Louis L. Boyer, Morristown, Pa. 



A MISSOURI HERD. 

W. T. Runyon, deputy game warden for 
this county, told me that 5 men, at Nor- 
borne, caught 3933 crappies from 4 p. m. 
to 7.30 p. m. The following are the names 
of the men : N. R. Avers, Tom Thomas, 
John R. Webb. Chris Rossell and T. 1. 
Moran. He also said the following men 
used a seine in the same water : W. B. 
Limpleman, Thomas Minnis and Joe Pyles. 
If this is true you will have a few more 
swine for your pen. Also, I think this 
county needs a new deputy game warden. 

Will you please write those fellows and 
find out the facts in the case. If true, 1 
hope you will teach them a lesson thev 
will not soon forget. 

S. T., Carrollton, Mo. 

I wrote the men, and received the fol- 
lowing reply: 

The boys often catch 300 or 400 fish in 
a forenocn. I have caught 25 crappies in = 
minutes, and did not think it any big thing. 
The bass are not doing much this year and 
we don't catch many of them. 

A few years ago 3 of us left Norborne 
at 3 p. m. and got back at 5 p. m., having 
caught 68 bass. The smallest one weighed 
12 ounces, the largest one 2 T / 2 nounds. I 
also caught, at another time, in 5 hours' 
fishing, a string of black perch 16 feet long, 
the lot weighing over 85 pounds. I used 
one pole only, but had 4 hooks on the line 
and averaged 2 fish at a catch, baited with 
worms. All of this can be proved by the 
best business men of the town. 

I saw one crappie to-day that weighed 
J l / 2 pounds. Two men brought in 120 large 
frogs. 

If you want any true stories, let me know. 
N. R. Ayres, Norborne, Mo. 

You wear the longest crop of bristles I 
have come across in many a day, and if 
your statements are anywhere near correct, 
you must be in a congenial atmosphere, 
for there seem to be plenty of swine 
in and about your town. Your number in 
the fish hog book is 1,052, and those of 
your friends are 1,053, 1,054, 1,055, 1.056, 
respectively. — Editor. 



42 



FISH AND FISHING. 



43 



NOT GUILTY. 

I am a regular reader of your excellent 
magazine and greatly admire your efforts 
to prevent the slaughter of game. I en- 
close a clipping from the Kansas City Star. 
These men need a roasting. 

A S., Hiawatha, Kas. 

The clipping referred to says : 

C. B. Norton has just returned from a visit to 
Walker, Minn. With him were Herman Schmel- 
zer, the Rev. S. M. Neel, and his daughter, Miss 
Edith Norton. "One day," said Mr. Norton, "we 
caught 126 fish. Another catch figured at 112. 
Dr. Neel is a good fisherman and few can equal 
Mr. Schmelzer. My daughter also has a hook and 
line record." 

I wrote these men, asking if the report 
was correct, and received the following 
answer: 

It is true my party and I caught 115 fish 
in one day in Lake Neal, near Walker, 
Minn., but there were 9 instead of 3 in the 
party. We had 5 boats, 2 men to a boat. 

In the party were Rev. Dr. Neal, a prom- 
inent minister of this city; Judge W. H. 
Sandusky, Judge of the Criminal Court at 
Liberty, Mo.; Dr. J. R. Rothwell, surgeon 
of the C. M. & St. P. Ry. ; Standley Fields, 
a retired farmer, living near Liberty, Mo.; 
C. L. Chase, the genial landlord of the 
Chase Hotel, Walker, Minn. ; J. A. Beasley, 
Bowling Green, Ky. ; also the pilot, an en- 
gineer of the White Swan launch and my- 
self. I mention these names so you may 
know that the party was not fishing for 
the market. Our catch was as follows : 26 
Oswego bass, 20 rock bass, 29 walleyed 
pike, 40 pickerel. The last named fish is 
known by the natives as a snake. No na- 
tive will eat them. They are to the Minne- 
sota angler what the German carp is in the 
Central and Southern waters, a nuisance, 
and kill the finer game fishes. 

I trust this letter will meet with your ap- 
proval and not have the scent of pot fishing. 
Herman Schmelzer, Kansas City, Mo. 

Your catch was not at all excessive. — 
Editor. 



HARD WORKING BRISTLEBACKS. 

George Hubbell, Julius Hasmann and J. M. 
Grasher, of Milwaukee, were here early in the 
week on a fishing trip with Vital Boyere. They 
returned home Monday evening, taking with 
them 450 brook trout, which they caught in 2 
days in the streams near here. This is one of 
the largest catches of the season and the Mil- 
waukee gentlemen were much pleased with their 
success. — Milwaukee Papers. 

In reply to my request for verification of 
this report, I received the following. 

The report about 2 friends and me catch- 
ing 450 brook trout is correct, but not many 
persons would go through the hardships 
we did at the time, beginning at 4 in the 



morning and fishing until dark, despite 
mosquitoes and deep water. 

J. H. Grasher, Milwaukee, Wis. 

It is not strange that you should have 
worked hard in order to slaughter a large 
number of trout. A 4-legged hog, when he 
gets into a potato patch, works as hard 
and as long as you and your friends did 
on the trout stream, and the fact that you 
suffered from mosquitoes and flies is some 
consolation to the decent sportsmen whom 
you have deprived of a share of the sport. 
Your names go in the fish hog book in the 
following order : J. H. Grasher, No. 1,057; 
George Hubbell, No. 1,058; Julius Has- 
mann, No. 1,059. — Editor. 



A REPORTED MONSTER. 

A big fish story comes from the City of 
Mexico. It relates that a great flood in the 
Rio Grande brought down so much mud 
that it fairly choked the fishes and com- 
pelled them to seek the shoal water along 
the banks and in the bayous, to avoid being 
choked to death. Thousands of fish were 
picked up by the natives. Some were sim- 
ply lifted out of the water by hand, others 
were killed with clubs, pitchforks, etc. 

A native Mexican, named Pedro Sainz, 
and his 2 sons found a monstrous catfish in 
a narrow lagoon, in water not more than 2 
or 3 feet deep. They built heavy brush 
dams above and below him so he could not 
get out and then went in after him. He 
churned the water into mud so that it was 
difficult to see him and he pounded the men 
about in good shape as he rushed up and 
down the narrow channel. He also cut 
their legs repeatedly with the sharp, spiny 
rays of his pectoral fins. The men were 
unable to land him without implements, so 
one of them went to town, borrowed a rifle, 
and when the fish stuck his head up to get 
air, shot him. He proved to be a monster, 
and is said to have weighed 237 pounds. No 
measurements are given, and while the 
figures as to weight are probably excessive, 
yet it is known that the catfish does grow 
to 150 pounds in weight. 



NIBBLES. 

When the latest issue of Recreation 
comes to hand I lay aside other business at 
the earliest possible moment that I may de- 
vote my time to reading it. from cover to 
cover. The article entitled "Some Fly 
Fishing Wrinkles," by E. E. Hickok, in the 
issue for April, 1904, gave me information 
I desired at that time and well repaid me 
for the money invested in becoming a sub- 
scriber. I thank Mr. Hickok for his "Wrin- 
kles," so timely placed before his readers. 
I trust he will continue to give us anglers, 



44 



RECREATION. 



from time to time, practical articles teach- 
ing the gentle art. 

I also thank Mr. T. R. Navarre, of Mon- 
roe, Mich., for directing my attention to 
the Hildesandt spinning baits by his arti- 
cle on page 296 of the same issue. I am at 
a loss to understand why the manufacturer 
of the best artificial bait or lure I have ever 
used does not advertise in the best maga- 
zine for sportsmen now published, to wit, 
Recreation. 

Miles E. Burlingame, Willett, N. Y. 



Herman Fogle and Austin Schrock, of. 
Rockwood, Pa., built a fence across Buffalo 
creek near that town. Then they diverted 
the. stream so as to entrap large numbers 
of fish in a box formed of wire netting. 
When they had drawn off the water, they 
would get into the box and kill the fish 
with clubs. Constable F. B. Whiteman 
heard of the operations of these vandals 
and went after them. He got them, with 
166 fish in their possession, and took them 
before Justice David Gildner, who fined the 
men $1,660. They were unable to raise the 
money and have therefore gone to jail to 
serve out the sentence at the rate of $1 a 
day. It is not likely they will go into the 
fish trapping business again when they get 
out. — Editor. 



It may be of interest to you to know that 
the people who kill an unreasonable number 
of fish are beginning to fear you. I was in 
Minneapolis recently and an insurance man 
was telling me about some State agents of 
insurance companies catching a large string 
of pike in Cass lake last summer. The 
catch was well into the hundreds. He said 
you wrote the fellows, but they knew what 
was coming, so they hedged ; they wrote 
you about it, but put it in a good light. You 
see, even if you were unable* to brand these 
fellows, it has set them thinking. Probably 
it is just as well this way, for they are all 
good fellows, and undoubtedly have horse 
sense enough to be good in the future. 
E. E. Miller, St. Peter, Minn. 



Luther Showalter, of the Pottstown high school 
faculty, and Harry Trumbauer, of Royersford, re- 
turned Friday from Pike county with the larg- 
est catch of trout ever brought to this city. There 
were 100 trout in their baskets, none under 8 
inches in length, and the largest measured 17^2 
inches. — Pa. Paper. 

I wrote these 2 men asking for the facts 
in the case. Trumbauer answered, but 
evaded the question entirely. Showalter 
made no response to my inquiry, so it is fair 
to conclude that the published report is cor- 
rect. Showalter's number in the fish hog 
bok is 1,060 and Traumbauer's is 1,061. 
— Editor. 



Otto Beranek and Frank Faulkner, of 
New Haven, Conn., went fishing with 
dynamite. They were caught in the act 
and arraigned before Justice S. J. Scriber, 
who fined Beranek $50 and Faulkner $25. 
It is unfortunate that Justice Scriber had 
not read the opinion of Judge Smith, of 
Helena, Mont., who fined a man $400 for 
dynamiting. In the course of his remarks 
Judge Smith said that a man who used 
dynamite to kill fish should properly be 
termed a fish hog. It is, therefore, in order 
to enter Beranek and Faulkner in the fish 
hog register under the numbers 1,062 and 
1,063, respectively. — Editor. 



A correspondent, writing from Mallet's Bay, Lake 
Champlain, town of Colchester, Vt., to the Osh- 
kosh Northwestern, says he is enjoying camp life 
on a beautiful bay of that lake; that his party 
consists of himself, his sister and her husband 
and 4 children, and that they have had some great 
fishing. "The fishing," he says, "is all anyone 
can desire." It seems even good enough to sat- 
isfy a fish hog. In 6 days the party caught and 
killed 384 pounds of game fish, but as long as the 
fish hog had a good time, nobody is expected to 
complain. 

The fish hog should be run out of the coun- 
try. — Milwaukee Free Press. 

The writer of the foregoing has learned 
his lesson from Recreation. — Editor. 



When you wish to catch bass, either by 
trolling or casting, go to the Rideau lakes, 
Westport, Canada. They are there, in great 
.numbers, both large and small mouth. I 
fished about an hour and got 8 bass, that 
weighed 15 pounds. The largest weighed 
3 pounds and the others 7 and 12 pounds; 
but anglers frequently take from those lakes 
bass weighing 4 to 5 pounds each. What 
we called wall-eyed pike and they call pick- 
erel are also plentiful and 'large. 

James S. Clark, New York City. 



In the office of A. A. Dayton, on State 
street, is a mounted small mouth black bass 
which he caught in the St. Lawrence river 
last summer, off Grindstone island. The 
bass weighed 4^ pounds, is 20 inches long, 
and is said to be one of the largest, if not 
the record catch of last season in that part 
of the river. S. A., Albany, N. Y. 



There is little game or good fishing here. 
Every stream around here is fairly alive 
with carp, but there are no bass or game 
fishes of any kind. I should like to hear 
from other readers on the carp. 

Alex. Moore, Anderson, Ind. 



My friend, Charles H. Miller, of 430 
West Eighteenth street, New York City, 
caught 8 large weakfish on the flood tide 
at Woodmere, L. I., one day last Septem- 
ber. O. F., Jersey City, N. J. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



Anybody can shoot all day but a gentleman always quits when he gets enough. 



MUZZLE LOADING RIFLES. 

I read everything Recreation says about 
rifles and pistols, and as frequent inquiries 
are made relative to old fashioned muzzle 
loaders I take pleasure in stating some of 
my observations of noted shooters, from 
here to the Rocky mountains, and South to 
Florida. 

I commenced shooting 57 years ago with 
a so called smooth bore rifle, 50 balls to 
the pound. It had a flintlock, a barrel 4 
feet long and weighed 8 pounds. It had a 
good reputation for long range shooting, 
with shot, and I killed many wild pigeons 
with it at 75 yards, using large shot. With 
bullet it shot well enough for me to win in 
matches at 35 yards offhand.- 

About 1850, percussion locks came into 
general use, so I had one. put on the smooth 
bore and the barrel cut to 36 inches. This 
ended the effectiveness of that gun for 
shooting either shot or ball. 

On inquiring of a gunsmith as to the bad 
shooting, he said the "powder burned too 
rapidly; that gas could not escape as in 
the pan of the flintlock ; that a hole must 
be drilled in the cylinder.'' This was done 
and the gun shot much closer. 

I do not remember seeing a percussion 
lock gun 50 years ago without a pinhole in 
the cylinder. The smooth bore was the 
best all around gun we had in those days. 
Loaded with BB shot we could kill any- 
thing from a robin to a turkey or a fox. By 
using a patched ball and caliber of 50 to 
60 the ball would make such a large hole 
in a bear or a deer that he could not run far. 

A friend of mine who was a good hunter 
up to 75 years of age always used a large, 
smooth bore, and I once saw him have 
3 large bears in a heap. I should not like 
to tell you how many deer he killed with 
the same gun. 

In those early days the man with a 
smooth bore at a match shot only 35 yards 
offhand, while the man with a rifle shot 60 
yards offhand and 100 with a rest. 

I have often seen men with these old 
smooth bores make strings of 3 shots at 
35 yards offhand measuring only one inch. 

There were tricky shooters in those days 
as well as in our time. For instance, one 
old man in our place, now 78 years old, 
told me not long ago that he had a small 
bore rifle reamed out smooth a few inches 
down from the muzzle so the rifling be- 
low could not be seen, so that he could get 
in the short range class. Of course, he won 
every turkey match for a while ; but he got 
his Waterloo one day when the ground 



was covered with snow. The shooters knew 
he was tricky and were watching him 
closely. Finally, one of the shooters saw 
a patch from the old. man's gun drop on 
the snow. The traces of the rifling showed 
plainly on the patch and Uncle Eli's game 
was up. 

In those days no elbow rest was allowed 
in offhand shooting. The left arm must be 
held straight. Some tricksters would have 
a spring made to buckle to the arm inside 
the coat sleeve, and this spring, with a lit- 
tle jerk, would fly into a slatted breastplate 
making the arm rigid. 

At 14 years of age I got a real twist rifle 
with barrel made of old horseshoe nails; 7 
deep grooves; metal % inch thick, and 
carrying 100 round balls to the pound. It 
was sighted at 60 yards, and shot low enough 
at 20 or 30 1 yards, by taking a low sight, to 
hit anything. 

Of the hundreds of deer and bear I saw 
killed 50 years ago" I fiever saw one killed 
at over 60 yards. The method of hunting 
deer in those days was to station men at 
the runways, from mountain to creek or 
river, and have one man take the hounds to 
drive the deer to the runways, where I have 
often seen them shot at less than 20 feet. 

Few shooters thought themselves able to 
own a gun that was good enough to shoot 
100 yards, though a few had special heavy 
rifles made for shooting at rest at 100 
yards. These were generally about 50 cali- 
ber and usually weighed about 20 pounds. 
I have one of them now, which is in as 
good condition as it was 46 years ago. 

The bore of those rifles had 9 grooves, 
one turn in 40 inches, whereas most modern 
rifles have one turn in 14 inches. The balls 
for these old rifles were generally patched 
with heavy drilling. 

On going to a match a man would buy 
one or more boards, as his purse permitted. 
The boards at a pig or ox match usually 
sold at 50 cents to $1 each, allowing 3 shots, 
string measure from center of ball to cross. 
After buying his boards he would be al- 
lowed one trial shot. He would then make 
a cross on his board, and all measurements 
would be made from that. 

If the shooter bought 6 boards he would 
usually make one shot at each and then 
lay them aside. If the sun was shining 
he would take the last board and put a 
second shot into it ; then one into each of 
the others in succession. Sometimes he 
would not complete the boards until nearly 
dark, waiting for the sun to get right, or 
for the wind to stop blowing, or for the 



45 



4 6 



RECREATION. 



rain to cease falling, or to recover from a 
nervous attack. 

I never saw anyone win a prize at a 
match at either 60 yards offhand or 100 
I yards rest with more than a one inch string. 
Nor have I ever seen any one do better 
shooting than that at 60 or 100 yards with 
any modern rifle. 
I About i860 Gen. Morgan James made a 
rifle with a hexagonal bore and without 
' grooves, the angles of the hexagon repre- 
senting the grooves in the old rifles. This 
gun had a muzzle piece, loaded with a con- 
ical, needle pointed ball, linen patched, and 
was capable of making fine scores at 100 
yards. 

These old fashioned muzzle loaders, even 
if sighted for 300 yards, had low killing 
power at that distance, as the powder was 
not strong enough. 

In 1858 I bought a Marsden breech load- 
ing single shot rifle. The ball was conical 
and the caliber about 38. It used a paste- 
board cartridge with leather bottom, per- 
forated, combustible substance in hole, and 
was fired by percussion cap. I, tried the 
rifle at 35 yards and was disgusted with it. 
In fact, I have not got over the feeling to 
this day, though I have tried nearly every 
make of rifle on the market. 

I had a gunsmith make me a pair of bul- 
let moulds to cast a round ball, using a thin 
linen patch, and killed many kinds of game. 
With that ball the game was anything from 
a wild pigeon to a buffalo. While on the 
plains from 1859 to 1866 I never refused a 
match at 35 yards. 

J. H. Kauffman, M.D., Minersville, Pa. 



THE AUTOMATIC PISTOL IS DIFFERENT. 

Answering W. M. Pugh's inquiry in your 
September issue, I have a Colt automatic 
pistol, .38 caliber, and in my judgment it 
is far superior to the revolver in accuracy, 
range and penetration, these being the es- 
sential points to be considered. The ord- 
nance experts of the U. S. Army have also 
reported that the pistol is as durable as the 
service revolver and not more liable to get 
out of order. 

In the automatic there is no leakage of 
powder gases between the cylinder and the 
barrel, as there is in the revolver. The 
cartridge is chambered the same as for a 
rifle, and this gives the bullet greater ve- 
locity, about 1,250 feet a second. In the 
service revolver the velocity of the bullet 
is but a little over 700 feet. 

With the .38 automatic I have shot 
through 9 pine boards, % inch thick, placed 
6 inches apart, the first one about 10 feet 
from the muzzle. The Colt people put the 
killing range at 500 yards. This pistol has 
little recoil and for this reason better shoot- 
ing can be done with it than with the re- 



volver of heavy caliber. I am not much of 
a shot, but have made some fair scores 
with the Colt. 

I owned a revolver of one of the best 
makes, using the 44 W. C. F. cartridge; 
but owing to the heavy recoil it was diffi- 
cult for me to hit what I aimed at. In such 
a revolver the recoil causes the barrel to be 
thrown upward and in order to overcome 
this in shooting, the front sight is made 
high to make the barrel point below the ob- 
ject aimed at. Then, as the barrel is re- 
coifing up past the mark, the bullet leaves 
the muzzle. This makes the revolver re- 
quire exact uniformity in holding, because 
if the gun is held tightly it will shoot low, 
while if held loosely it will shoot high. In 
the automatic, owing to the absence of re- 
coil, the- tightness of the grasp makes but 
little difference in the shooting. 

In my opinion the Colt automatic is far 
superior to the Luger and the Mauser for 
hunting purposes, as its larger caliber and 
heavier bullet give it far more shocking 
power. In the hands of a good shot the 
automatic pistol possesses great possibili- 
ties, and it was reported in a recent issue 
of Recreation that a man was doing good 
work with it killing mountain sheep, in 
Alaska, at comparatively long ranges. 

The Colt automatic pistol is not compli- 
cated. It is composed of few parts, and 
for that reason is not liable to get out of 
order. I have fired a good many shots with 
mine, and it has never missed fire nor failed 
to extract the empty shell. 

This pistol yill never fail to work if 
given reasonable care. The slide should be 
kept slightly oiled with a not too heavy oil, 
which should be used sparingly in cold 
weather. On account of the absence of re- 
coil the arm is pleasant to shoot, and clean- 
ing it is a pleasure as compared with clean- 
ing the revolver. A few strokes of the 
cleaner through the barrel and there you 
are. 

To clean a revolver properly it is nec- 
essary to remove the cylinder, as the leak- 
age of powder gases fouls the frame badly. 
Then the barrel, cylinder and frame must 
be thoroughly cleaned, which I have found 
quite a task. The automatic can be thor- 
oughly cleaned and oiled in less than a 
minute. 

The Colt automatic is safer than the re- 
volver, as it is fitted with a safetv device 
so that it requires the full blow of the ham- 
mer to explode the cartridge. Should the 
arm be dropped with a cartridge in the 
chamber, in such a manner as to strike on 
the hammer, it would not explode the cart- 
ridge. The Colt is also lighter than any 
of the large caliber revolvers, surpasses 
them all in range and power, and is far 
more accurate. 

To those who are used to the revolver 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



47 



the automatic looks and feels a little awk- 
ward in the hands at first; but after shoot- 
ing it a few times this idea is entirely dis- 
pelled. 

The Ideal Manufacturing Company is 
now making a reloading tool for this arm, 
and as black powder and lead bullets can 
be used, it will cheapen the ammunition for 
target practice. 

Not having used the .32 caliber auto- 
matic I know nothing about it, but it is 
undoubtedly a fine little pocket gun. though 
of course too light to take into the woods 
for big game. 

I am constantly surprised that the makers 
of this splendid arm do not advertise in 
Recreation. 

Al. Kennedy, Post Falls, Idaho. 



RELOADING SHOT SHELLS. 

Two years ago 2 friends and I began ex- 
perimenting with reloaded shot gun shells. 
We have since then been using reloaded 
shells almost exclusively for shooting rails, 
ducks, plover and snipe and find them prac- 
tically as good as new shells. 

We have also used them at the trap. 
August 4th, last, on the grounds of the 
Middletown Shooting club, I broke 117 tar- 
gets with 130 shots. Of the shells used 50 
were factory loaded. With them I scored 
45 targets, 90 per cent. Eight shells re- 
loaded with the same load, 38 grains 
smokeless and 1^4 ounces No. 7^4 shot, 
broke 72 targets, also 90 per cent. In other 
events I did fully as well with reloaded 
shells as with factory loads. 

As a rule, 90 per cent, is above my gait. 
Between 80 and 85 per cent, is my usual 
record. The point I wish to make is that 
I have not jumped at the conclusion that 
reloaded shells are equal to new, but have 
proved it by repeated trials. 

Furthermore, I sent 100 shells to a firm 
thoroughly equipped for making these tests. 
Thirty were factory loads; 400 were new 
hand loaded shells ; the remainder were re- 
loaded. There was practically no difference 
in results. The factory loads had slightly 
higher velocity; the hand loaded, both new 
and reloaded, made the better pattern, both 
for number of pellets and uniformity. 

The Winchester people have queered 
themselves here by putting shells on the 
market that can not be reloaded. 

I should like to hear from Recreation' 
readers on the subject of reloaded shells. 

There are many little points to be ob- 
served in reloading old or loading new 
shells in order to attain satisfactory re- 
sults ; and, while we do not claim perfec- 
tion, we certainly get good results and save 
one cent on each shell, a big item where 
several thousand shells are annually used 
by an individual. 

W, p. Barnarcl, Middletown, Del. 



RECREATION DID IT. 

W T yndygoul, Cos Cob, Ct. 
Editor Recreation, 

23 West 24th Street, New York City. 
Dear Sir: — 

I have just returned from Manitoba, and 
where there I saw many of the sportsmen 
and others interested in the preservation of 
game. I was glad to meet Dr. George Bell, 
who was the leader in the fight against the 
•automatic gun, which, as you know, has 
been declared illegal in the province of 
Manitoba. He surprised and pleased me by 
saying that not the local sportsmen had 
done it so much as Recreation. 

"It was Recreation that warned us the 
gun was coming ; it was Recreation that 
pointed out the danger ; it was Recreation 
that supplied us with arguments to fight it. 
We went around in Winnipeg and got prac- 
tically every sportsman to sign a protest 
against the automatic gun. Armed with 
this we went before the Legislature. Our 
only opponent was a local representative of 
the Winchester Arms Company, and his 
heart, evidently, was not in his work. He 
came there simply because his company 
wished it ; but once our case was presented, 
and a number of extracts from Recreation 
read to the committee, the Winchester man 
subsided. He did not even present his case 
at length. The thing was easily carried in 
the House. 

'"I want you," he said, "to tell the editor 
of Recreation that we owe it to him, and 
we. appreciate what he has done." 
Yours sincerely, 

Ernest Thompson Seton. 
September 24, 1904. 



THE ITHACA CROSS BOLT. 
Mr. Greener, in one of his books, says 
that no cross bolt for shot guns was a success 
because they all lacked the necessary self 
tightening power. What the great gun- 
maker meant was that in order to be effec- 
tive in holding the barrels tightly to the 
frame, the bolt had to be fitted too tightly 
in the frame and extension rib to permit 
the free and easy movement of the top 
lever. What he said then was true at that 
time, and is true still, with the new Ithaca 
cross bolt excepted. The Ithaca bolt is a 
bar of the best spring steel and # is always 
held in true position in a slot cut in the 
solid frame by its own spring power or re- 
siliency. It has a firm bearing in 3 direct 
irons on the slot cut in extension rib, but, 
not being bound by friction, allows the top 
lever to work freely. This makes the Ithaca 
cross bolt a success, and with the other de- 
sirable features, including simplicity, dura- 
bility, neatness of design and phenomenal 
shooting qualities, makes the Ithaca the 
most perfect hammerless gun in the mar- 
ket. Let any sportsman test this weapon, 



4 8 



RECREATION. 



and he will find that what Greener longed 
for but could not find, American ingenuity 
has supplied, and this, too, in a gun which 
sells at a moderate price. No other gun 
costing even more money can cope with it. 
Glenmore, Warren, Pa. 



SMALL SHOT. 

Is there such a thing made as bullet-proof 
cloth or anything that can be use-d for that 
purpose? If there is, , will you kindly let 
me know where I can get it? 

I enjoy Recreation more than any other 
book I /read. 

A. W. Gordon, Boston, Mass. 

ANSWER. 

There is no bullet-proof cloth on the 
market. Several fabrics have been invented 
and made up that were claimed to be bullet- 
proof and have been tested by army experts 
in various countries. None of these has, 
however, been adopted by any army, so 
nothing more has been done along that 
line, as far as I know. 

It would be a good scheme for every man 
going into the woods of Maine or the Adi- 
rondacks for the purpose of hunting to 
have a suit of bullet-proof armor, but in 
order to make him entirely safe from other 
hunters it would be necessary to have it 
cover his head, neck, face and even his 
eyes. Then he could not see to hunt or to 
shoot; so, after all, he might just as well 
stay at home.— Editor. 



I have noticed with considerable interest 
the articles in defence of the pump gun. 
Will the defenders please give the real rea- 
son why they prefer a repeating or an auto- 
matic weapon? 'They evidently appreciate 
its rapid firing qualities. The statements 
which have been made that the pump gun 
can outshoot a double barrel are absurd. 
In fact, I have never known a pump gun 
that would kill so far or so surely as the 
best double guns. I own a double gun 
which was acknowledged to be the best gun 
of 16 that were shot during the same day. 
Eight of them were Winchester pump guns, 
choke bored. Mine is a modified choke, and 
I was far from being the best shot of the 
party. There can be but one reason why 
we should prefer a breech loader to a muz- 
zle loader,, a hammerless to a hammer gun, 
a pump to a double barrel or an automatic 
to a pump gun. Perhaps you can guess this 
reason. Observer, Boston, Mass. 



If Single Barrel will write me I will tell 
him my experience with Remington guns, 
as well as many others ; experience of 57 
years, which ought to be of value to a 
young man starting out. 

Mr. Magee, of Templeton, Ore., has a re- 
markable 16 gauge gun, to be "pretty sure 



on canvasbacks at 75 yards." I have used 
at least 30 guns, from 8 gauge to 20, but I 
must take off my hat to his 16 gauge Ithaca. 
I have used 2 Ithacas, 10 and 12 gauge, but 
they never could shoot with the 16 of which 
Mr. Magee tells us. He is entitled to a 
diploma as a cheerful liar. 

Uncle D. T. T., Orient Point, N. Y. 

I want to say to Single Barrel, of Mon- 
treal, Can., that my experience has been 
similar to his. I owned a Winchester pump 
gun, 16 gauge, but sold it and got a Rem- 
ington, $45, 12 gauge, 7 pound hammerless, 
and have never had a gun to suit me as 
well. 



I desire to learn through Recreation, 
which is the best all around gun for ducks, 
quail and rabbits, with particulars as to 
weight, length of barrels, choke, gauge and 
make. 

I heartily endorse your fight against the 
automatic shot gun' and hope you may suc- 
ceed in creating such a sentiment against 
this weapon that any one who calls himself 
a sportsman will be ashamed to use it. It 
is a pity that the Winchester people, who 
have received the trade of sportsmen all 
over the United States, should put such a 
gun on the market, for it shows that they 
care nothing for the welfare of the game. 
They seem to think only of how they may 
profit by its destruction. I intend buying 
a gun this fall, and am going to get a 
double barrel shot gun. 

A. L. Fleet. Slater. Mo. 



A while ago I saw in Recreation a ques- 
tion regarding the relative penetration of 
Luger and Mauser pistols. Two years ago 
I made a test block for the Spaulding peo- 
ple which proved that, using factory am- 
munition, the pistols named were nearly 
equal in penetration. Each pierced 10 pine 
boards and lodged the bullet in the nth. 
The bullets were full jacketed, and, as I 
recall it, the Luger shells were of foreign 
make and the Mausers were domestic. The 
block was made of new pine boards, care- 
fully planed to one inch in thickness, laid 
tightly together and held by strips tacked 
on the edges. The distance from muzzles 
was 5 feet. 

E. W. Gould, Schenectady, N. Y. 



Will some one who has used a .32-44 
target revolver tell me what are the 
cleanest » and best brands of black and 
smokeless powders for use in that arm. for 
both target and gallery loads? I have 
become disgusted with the black powder 
carried in stock by dealers in the smaller 
towns on account of the excessive fouling, 
and the much lauded King's semi-smoke- 
less is not altogether satisfactory to one 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



49 



who does not clean a gun for the pleasure 
he gets out of it. How should bullets be 
tempered to get the best results in the 
cartridge named? How does the Stevens- 
Pope lubricator compare in effectiveness 
with the Ideal lubricator? 

W. H., Pontiac, 111. 



I greatly enjoy the gun department of 
Recreation, and always turn to it first. 
One can learn from the experience of 
others, but experience at first hand is bet- 
ter. Guns from 32-40 up are large enough 
if held straight. I don't like the jar of a 
smokeless rifle. Those who claim there is 
no kick to high pressure powder will 
change their minds when they get a dig 
from the corner of a butt plate in snap 
shooting. Should like to hear from some 
one who has tried the new Remington No. 
3 high pressure gun. I prefer a single shot 
rifle. Among repeaters I like the box mag- 
azine best ; it does not scrape and smash 
the points of the bullets. 

P. H. M., Kendrick, Idaho. 



I am sorry the Winchester people have 
injudiciously withdrawn their ad from 
Recreation, thus losing the patronage of 
thousands of your readers. I hope they 
may see their mistake and return before it 
is too late. 

I should like to hear from some one who 
has practically tested the 22-7-45 smokeless 
in all essential points. 

• Edw. McGaffick, Salena, O. 

Winchester's loss is Savage's gain. Sav- 
age makes a better rifle than the Winches- 
ter, and Recreation readers will have the 
best, especially when it is advertised in 
Recreation. — Editor. 



I have been shooting and hunting ever 
since I was able to hold a gun. I am sorry 
the Winchester Company intends to put an 
automatic gun on the market. Such a 
slaughtering machine should not be out 
within the reach of the bristlebacks. No 
true sportsman would be caught dead with 
an automatic gun. If such a weapon is put 
on the market, I shall never own one, and 
shall do all I can to prevent my friends 
buying one. if any friend of mine should 
be so foolish as to think of buying one. 
Keep on hitting the game hog till our coun- 
try is rid of such animals. 

Wm. L. Wallace, Richmond, Ky. 



The automatic shot gun that the Win- 
chester people are preparing to turn out 
will, put the finishing touch on what little 
game the pump gun has spared. If it is 
all that i-s claimed, it will be just the thing 
for market hunters and game hogs. I 



should like to see it tested on the man 
who invented it. No decent man would 
carry such a gun a-field ; and I do not see 
that it would have any special value at the 
trap, except to the kind of fellow who 
hankers to break 1,000 clays in 1,000 sec- 
onds. A sportsman can do all the shoot- 
ing necessary with a double barrel or, for 
that matter, with a single. 

S. C. Harris, Hoboken, N. J. 



All friends of the game, and this means 
all who oppose the pump and automatic 
guns, should do their share of missionary 
work. If you have a friend who contem- 
plates the purchase of a rifle or a shot gun, 
advise him to buy of some of the makers 
who have too much principle to put a mur- 
dering machine on the market, or of a re- 
tail dealer who refuses to sell such guns. 
This is easy. Work together, sportsmen, 
and we can soon make our efforts effective. 
F. L. Wilson, Whitney, Ore. 



In this State the buyers of Browning 
automatic guns are mighty careful and re- 
luctant in confessing their ownership. They 
keep their guns in cases on all public oc- 
casions, which is evidence that your attacks 
go home. I hope to see an anti-automatic 
gun law in Massachusetts before our last 
glorious old ruffed grouse shall have drum- 
med in vain for a mate. 

Ernest Russell, Worcester, Mass. 



Can the 38-72, model '95, Winchester, be 
used with smokeless powder with good re- 
sults? Can the same model, 35 caliber, be 
used with black powder? How docs the 
32 Winchester special compare ■ with the 
.303 Savage? 

Savage, Monticello, N. Y. 



I should like the opinion of your readers 
about the wearing and shooting qualities of 
a Stevens pocket rifle. Which is the more 
accurate cartridge, the 22 long rifle or the 
25? Elmer Dukelorn, Hutchinson, Kas. 



"Pardon me, did you see a dachshund 
near here?" 

^Yes." 

'Where was he?" 

''Partly on Euclid avenue and partly on 
Erie street." — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



A foolish young woman named Clara, 
The rest of her name was O'Hara, 
Just worried and worried, 
And kept herself flurried, 
Because she was tall-^-and so narra. 

- — Cleveland Leader 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that is the end of it. If photographed, it may still live and its 
educational and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



THE BOLL WEEVIL A NATIONAL 
CALAMITY. 
The cotton industry is the most impor- 
tant one in the United States, and is of 
interest to every one. It contributes more 
to the prosperity of all the people than 
any other 2 commodities. Being in round 
numbers about one-third of our total ex- 
ports, it pays a greater tribute to the trans- 
portation companies than any other com- 
modity, and it is the only one of which no 
part is consumed where it is produced. 

The boll weevil is the most serious pest 
that has ever affected any agricultural pro- 
duct. Under separate cover, I send you 
Farmers' Bulletin No. 189, issued by the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. From 
page 7 I quote the opening paragraph : 

"The work of the Division of Ento- 
mology for several years has demonstrated 
that there is not even a remote probability 
that the boll weevil will ever be extermi- 
nated. Although the large yields of cot- 
ton of former times may no longer be pos- 
sible, it is nevertheless entirely feasible to 
produce cotton at a margin of profit that 
will compare favorably with that made 
in the production of other staple crops of 
the United States by following what have 
become known generally as the cultural 
methods." 

Had Mr. Hunter added after "the cul- 
tural methods" "the protection and pre- 
servation of birds;" he would have offered 
the only known remedy. 

On page 11 is a map showing the boll 
weevil area in Texas. During 1904 this 
pest has gone 100 miles into Louisiana. 
From page 22, I quote as follows : 

"The steady extension of the territory 
affected by the weevil from year to year, 
until the Northern boundary is far North 
of the center of cotton production in the 
United States, has convinced all observers 
that it will eventually be distributed all 
over the cotton belt." 

Statistics show us that in the South the 
average yield of cotton per acre is decreas- 
ing each year. 

For the entire United States the yield 
has decreased from 40-100 of a bale per 
acre in 1899 to 34-100 of a bale in 1903; 
and with the exception of North Carolina, 
every State shows as great a decrease in 
yield, and some a greater. During this 
period of 5 years, S l A million acres have 
been added to the cotton fields of the South, 
while the production has only increased 
650,000 bales. 

In Texas, the yield in 1899 was 49-100. of 

*3 



a bale per acre, and in 1903 was 30-100 of 
a bale per acre, a reduction of 25 per cent. 
While all of this is not chargeable to the 
boll weevil, the larger part is. Say that 
20 per cent, is due to the boll weevil ; you 
can appreciate what a calamity it will be 
to the South and to the United States when 
the boll weevil infests the cotton fields to 
the Atlantic ocean. 

The cotton farmers should do 2 things, 
adopt cultural methods that will increase 
the yield, and protect their birds. 

The boll weevil is much like obnoxious 
weeds and grasses and must be treated in 
the same way. Any one familiar with cot- 
ton growing knows that unless the farmer 
fights the weeds and grasses from the be- 
ginning, they will take his crop, and in 
some instances they do take the crop. Sta- 
tistics show us that about 3 per cent, of the 
cotton acreage is abandoned every year. 
The larger part of this is because the weeds 
and grasses have taken the crop. 

Oswald Wilson, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, Ft. Worth, Texas. 



OUR NEWEST GAME PRESERVE. 

FRANK M. MILLER. 

Last August I made a cruise among the 
islands of the Gulf of Mexico lying to the 
Eastward of the delta of the Mississippi 
river. I sailed from Pass Christian, Miss., 
in a 6 ton schooner owned and run by a 
bird hunter of 15 years' experience. Each 
year he has killed and shipped to the whole- 
sale milliners of New York and Baltimore 
some 30,000 skins of the royal tern, laugh- 
ing gull, least tern and other wild sea birds. 
About a year ago he ran afoul of the Lacey 
law, enacted by Congress as a result of the 
persistent efforts of the L; A. S., and the 
Audubon societies, and he quit the business. 
He told me he had had enough ! 

After we got out among the islands I 
found bird destruction going on every- 
where, and to cap the climax of cussed- 
ness the glue makers had boats out gather- 
ing gull eggs for their business. This 
trade amounts to between 50,000 and 75,000 
eggs of the royal tern and the laughing 
gull every breeding season. I also learned 
that the market men who had been driven 
out of Louisiana by our new game law in- 
tended to move out to the islands belong- 
ing to the National government in order to 
supply the market with game birds, and 
as that trade amounts to between 300,000 
and 500,000 wild sea ducks each season I 
concluded the time had come to do some- 
thing to stop the slaughter. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



5* 



I found that there were 28 islands belong- 
ing to the State of Louisiana on . which 
birds were breeding; once in great num- 
bers, now only in small colonies. I also 
found that there were 7 islands belong- 
ing to the Federal government that ought 
to be set aside for a game preserve. 

I went to Washington, consulted Dr. T, 
S. Palmer, 3d vice-president of the L. A. S., 
and gave him an outline of my proposition. 1 

He took up the matter with Secretary 
Wilson, with the result that on the 5th day 
of October President Roosevelt signed the 
order, creating and dedicating "Breton 
Island Reservation" as a game preserve for- 
ever. 

Breton island lies 100 miles South of 
the mainland of the State of Mississippi. 
The island is 12 miles long, % of a mile 
wide and contains several ponds of fresh 
water. It will in time make an ideal place 
for the wild sea ducks to winter, and as 
at least 300,000 of them will be saved from 
market hunters every year, one can readily 
see what the increase will amount to as the 
years go by. The Old Harbor islands are 
3 in number and contain about 1,000 acres. 
Here the royal tern, the laughing gull, the 
black skimmer and the least tern live and 
breed. When I was there a majestic flock 
of 500 frigate birds \. tre sailing high over 
the waters of the gulf, in fancied security. 

Free Masons' islands are 3 in number. 
They cover probably 10,000 acres, and sea 
birds breed extensively on them. 

The Department of ■ Agriculture will 
doubtless put a warden on the new Reser- 
vation and will cultivate various plants 
suitable for food of these resident and mi- 
gratory birds, and in time this will become 
the greatest sea bird preserve on our 
Southern coast. 

I should like to tell you about the fish 
and the fishing out among these islands, 
especially that of the lordly tarpon, 7 to 
9 feet in length ; but that is another story. 
Besides I have your promise that next 
summer you will go out with me to try 
your skill in these same waters. 



DO WILD DUCKS COMMIT SUICIDE? 

A sportsman writes of watching a wild 
duck which he had wounded. He said it 
dived and never came up, and he asked, 

"Do they ever fasten themselves to grass 
in the bottom -and thus commit suicide?" 

I do not think they do. They have too 
many tricks at command to think of any- 
thing of that kind. One circumstance comes 
to my mind which shows the cunning of 
these wild birds. 

I was shooting on a small creek last fall 
and winged a black duck, which rose some 
distance from me. He dropped in the creek, 
which was not more than 20 feet across. 



As I went through the brush to where he 
fell, he saw me before I had time to shoot 
and he dived. The water was still, and the 
creek shallow. I could see by the ripple 
his exact course. He swam about 50 feet 
and then rose for breath, with just his bill 
out of water; and then did not stay up 
more than a second. I was not accus- 
tomed to such tactics. When I found that 
was all I was likely to see of him I 
commenced to shoot at the little black bill 
as often as it showed above water. It was 
quick work. I had to move as fast as he 
swam and I did not have a sidewalk to 
travel on. I fired 4 or 5 shots at his bill 
and then I heard a little rustle in the crip- 
ple brush which closely fringed the creek. 
I thought, he was going out and that I. 
should lose him, after all. I went along to 
where I heard the noise, waded out as far 
as I could, and looked up and down the 
creek, but nothing was to be seen of the 
duck. I was departing with downcast eyes, 
when lo ! there he was dead, not 6 feet 
from me. 

I can easily imagine how it was with the 
gentleman who rowed out to where the 
duck disappeared and failed to see him come 
to the surface, especially if there was a 
ripple on the water. Even if there was not, 
he would not be likely to see the little bill 
come up with so much water around him. 
Again, he might have been directly over the 
duck. 

I heard a man tell of such an incident a 
few days ago. He was chasing a duck 
which he had wounded. He was out of 
ammunition and once nearly had a chance 
to hit the bird with an oar, but the duck 
dived. 

"Where do you sunnose that darned duck 
was?" he said. "Under my boat for a long 
time, with only his bill out of water !" 

Myron P. Edy, Clarenceville, P. Q. 



IF THE DOGS COULD TALK. 
Do female prairie chickens, quails, etc., 
give scent while raising broods? 

W. S. G., Todd, Boulder Creek, Cal. 

ANSWER. 

I referred this question to 2 well known 
authorities, who reply as follows : 

It seems impossible for any human being 
to say positively that game birds do not 
give off scent while raising broods of 
young. We have not the keen scent of 
hunting dogs by which to determine the 
fact. 

Unquestionably the dogs find it much 
more difficult to locate game at such times, 
but this is possibly due, in large part, to 
3 facts: First, The birds are poor and in 
bad feather after sitting and do not give out 
so strong a scent as a fat healthy bird does. 
Second, The vegetation at the time is green, 



52 



RECREATION. 



rank and odoriferous and swallows up the 
bird scent. Third, The atmospheric condi- 
tions do not favor scenting as they do after 
frost. 

These seem sufficient to account for the 
difficulties a dog encounters in search of 
game in hot weather, in luxuriant grasses, 
herbs and undergrowth ; but Nature is cun- 
ning and resourceful in her provisions for 
protecting wild animals in their reproduc- 
tion and it may be that she cuts off the 
odors in breeding season for this purpose. 
Jno. S. Wise, New York City. 

I know of no way to determine whether 
game birds can withhold their scent during 
the breeding season, unless, as you say, we 
can find a dog that can talk. Personally, I 
do not believe a bird can withhold its 
scent, but it is probable that the scent is 
lost much sooner in dry, hot summer time 
than it is in cooler weather. 
A. K. Fisher, Acting Chief Biological Sur- 
vey, U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



NATURAL HISTORY NOTES. 

Last summer I saw a bird which I took 
to be a black tern but was not sure. This 
is its description : 

Length, 6 to 8 inches ; tip to tip of wings, 
14 to j8 inches ; color, bill, head, neck and 
body, jet black; wings, tail, and under tail 
coverts, silvery grey or light drab. Bill, 
pointed and about 1% inches long. 

The bird was flying up and down the 
creek when I saw it about 8 to 10 feet above 
the water. Its flight was swift. It would 
suddenly stop in its flight and dip into the 
water and then come up. I do not know 
what it was after, but that was all it did. 
It did not alight while I watched it, but 
kept on the wing. It was tame and would 
come within a few feet of me. When fly- 
ing its bill pointed down at an angle of 45 
degrees. 

Keep up the good work of roasting the 
game and fish hogs. 

Fern. L. Young, Greenville, Ohio. 

ANSWER. 

The bird described is the black tern, 
Hydrochelidon nigra surinamensis. Its oc- 
currence in Ohio is unusual. — Editor. 



I have been reading Luther Michaels' 
and Geo. R. Mauley's opinions of Mr. Gor- 
don Wrighter's article about the snake and 
the pickerel. They may all 3 be right, for 
after something I saw I would not doubt 
anything. A friend and I were standing 
on the corner of Seneca and Michigan 
streets, looking in the window of the Canan- 
daigua hotel, the window being fitted up 
as an aquarium. Suddenly there was a com- 
motion and we were surprised to see a 
large frog with a small garter snake's head 
in its mouth. The snake had the best of it 



as long as they were on the edge of the 
tank, but as soon as they got into the water 
the frog turned the tables. It would have 
gone hard with the snake if one of the 
waiters in the hotel had not come to the 
rescue. I have often heard of snakes swal- 
lowing frogs, but that was the first time 
I ever heard of or saw a frog tackle a 
snake. If any reader of Recreation has 
heard of another case I should like to know 
of it. I find many articles in Recreation 
that I should like to answer if I had time. 
I am a lover of a good argument and that 
is one reason I like Recreation so well. 
Hugh D. Thompson, Brantford, Ont. 



I see by your September number that a 
reader % of your magazine wishes to know 
about song and game birds being turned 
out in British Columbia. Last winter sky- 
larks, goldfinches and robins were turned 
out on Vancouver island, B. C. I do not 
know how they have thrived, but it was 
the first attempt of the kind. Chinese 
pheasants and California quails are numer- 
ous all Over the island and are perfectly 
able to look after themselves. Last winter 
near the city of Vancouver, on the mainland, 
skylarks, thrushes and robins were turned 
out in the country. Pairs of English par- 
tridges have also been turned out in the 
country. Capercailzie, Ietras uragallus, have 
been turned out in the Algonquin National 
Park in Ontario ; black game also in New- 
foundland. 

If any of your readers wish further infor- 
mation I shall be glad to give it. 

A Canadian, Seattle, Wash. 



October 16th I saw a small snake on the 
Jersey Palisades, near Fort Lee. It was 
sunning itself on a grassy slope and when 
disturbed it crawled away quickly. It meas- 
ured about 20 to 25 inches in length, and Yx 
to one inch in diameter at the thickest part, 
which was comparatively near the head. It 
was light and dark brown mottled and its 
head was blunt. It showed the perfection 
of protective coloring among the dead grass 
and fallen leaves. Will you please tell me 
what kind of a snake it was? 

O. F, New York City. 

ANSWER. 

It was a hog nosed snake, or blowing 
viper. Look on page 347 of the American 
Natural History, by W. T. Flornaday, and 
see if the snake in the picture is not it. 
The blowing viper is harmless, but it hisses 
frightfully and is a great bluffer. — Editor. 



"Jones' cure was very quick, wasn't it?" 
"Yes ; his doctor received private infor- 
mation that his affairs were in bad shape,'' 
-—New Orleans Times-Democrat. 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, G. O. Shields, 23 W. 24th St., 
New York. 

1st Vice-President, E. T. Seton, 80 West 
40th St., New York. 

2d Vice-President, W. T. Hornaday, 2969 
Decatur Ave., Bedford Park, N. Y. 

3d Vice-President, Dr. T. S. Palmer, 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

4th Vice-President, A. A. Anderson, 80 
West 40th St., New York. 

5th Vice-President, Hon. W. A. Rich- 
ards, General Land Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

Secretary, A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington 
Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Treasurer, Austin Corbin. of the Corbin 
Banking Co., 192 Broadway, New York. 



LIFE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 

Beard, D. C, 204 Amity St., Flushing, L. I. 
Anderson, A. A., 80 W. 40th St., New York City. 
Blackstone, Lorenzo, Norwich, Conn. 
Buzzacott, Francis F., Chicago, 111. 
Brown, J. Stanford, 489 Fifth Ave., New York 

City. 
Butler, C. E., Jerome, Ariz. 
Carey, Hon. H. W., Eastlake, Mich. 
Carnegie, Andrew, 2d, Fernandina, Fla. 
Carnegie, George, Fernandina, Fla. 
Carnegie, Morris, Fernandina, Fla. 
Corbin, Austin, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
De Pauw, N. T., New Albany, Ind. 
Dickinson, E. H., Moosehead Lake, Me. 
Edgell, G. S., 192 Broadway, New York City. 
Ellis, W. D., 136 W. 72d St., New York City. 
Fearing, D. B., Newport, R. I. 
Ferry, C. H., 1720 Old Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Ferry, Mansfield, 183 Lincoln Park Boulevard, 

Chicago, 111. 
Fraser, A. V., 478 Greenwich St., New York City. 
Gilbert, Clinton, 2 Wall St., New York City. 
Hornaday, W. T., 2969 Decatur Ave., Bedford 

Park, N. Y. 
Hudson, E. J., 33 E. 35th St., Bayonne, N. J. 
McClure, A J., 158 State St., Albany, N. Y. 
McDermott; Col., J. H., Morgantown, W. Va. 
Mershon, W. B., Saginaw, Mich. 
Miller, F. G., 108 Clinton St., Defiance, O. 
Morton, Hon., Levi P., 681 Fifth Ave., New York 

City. 
Nesbitt, A. G., Maple St., Kingston, Pa. 
O'Conor, Col. J. C, 24 E. 33d St., New York 

City. 
Oliver, Rev. F. E., Winfield, Kans. 
Pierson, Gen. J. F., 20 W. S2d St., New York 

City. 
Prescott, A. L., 90 W. Broadway, New York City. 
Rice, A. F., 155 Pennington Ave., Passaic, N. J. 
Rininger, Dr. E. M., 142 E. 27th St, New York 

City. 
Seton, E T., 80 W. 40th St., New York City. 
Seymour, J. H.. 35 Wall St., New York City. 
Smith, E. B., Bourse Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith, W. H., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Thompson, J. Walter, Times Bldg., New York 

City. 
Towne, E. S., Care of National Blank Book Co., 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Underwood, W. L., 52 Fulton St., Boston, Mass. 
Valentine, Dr. W. A., 5 W. 35th St., New York 

City. 
H. Williams, Box 156 Butte, Mont. 



DISCOUNTS TO LEAGUE MEMBERS. 

The following firms have agreed to give 

members of the L. A. S. a discount of 2 

per cent, to 10 per cent, on all goods bought 

of them. In ordering please give L. A S. 

number : 

Syracuse Arms Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Guns. 

Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. Shot 
guns, rifles. 

Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photo- 
graphic goods. 

Blair Camera Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photographic 
goods. 

James Acheson, Talbot St., St. Thomas, Ontario, 
Sporting goods. 

Redifor Rod and Reel Co., Warren, Ohio. 



PROSECUTIONS IN WEST VIRGINIA. 

You inquire as to the fate of the dyna- 
miters arrested by Mr. Jacobs, Mr. Stew- 
art and me. I enclose herewith a type- 
written list of prosecutions for violations 
of our game and fish laws during the past 
11 months. This -list represents only what 
has been done by the L. A. S. in the way 
of enforcing the laws for the protection of 
game and fish, and I feel justified in say- 
ing that it does not represent more than 
half of the work accomplished by the local 
chapter of the L. A. S. There has been 
a decided change in public sentiment in 
favor of game and fish preservation, and 
many hoggish hunters have changed their 
methods. 

Of the members of the local chapter here 
who have been doing yeoman service for 
game preservation Elmer F. Jacobs and 
Terrence D. Stewart have probably been 
foremost, while John Coburn, Evans Price, 
Dr. Sivey, Newt. Dawson, and others de- 
serve much credit. The local newspapers 
have also aided greatlv in changing public 
sentiment in regard to the taking of game 
and fish and other harmless wild life. 
Bennett S. White, Chief Warden, 

Morgantown, W. Va. 

The list of prosecutions to which Mr. 
White refers is as follows, 

Oct. 23, H. E. Vensel, hunting without li- 
cense, fine and costs, $48. 

Oct. 23, H. E. Vensel, taking grouse out of 
State, fine and costs, $20. 

Oct. 25, *W. E. Johnson, killing quail unlaw- 
fully, fine and costs, $26.50. 

Dec. 7, J. E. Whiteman, exporting quail, fine 
and costs^ $31.60. 

Dec. 8, J. S. Cunningham, exporting quail, $20 
fine, costs not taxed. 

Dec. 16, Andy Frost, hunting squirrels unlaw- 
fully, dismissed. 

Dec. 19, M. J. Groves, exporting quail and 
grouse, fine and costs, $54.60. 

Dec. 22, P. F. Linger, exporting quail and' 
grouse, fine and costs, $65. 

Jan. 1-04, R. M. Cox, exporting quail and 
grouse, fine and costs, $289. 

Jan. 11, M. J. Groves, exporting quail and 
grouse, guilty, appeal pending. 



53 



S4 



RECREATION. 



May s, Harry Harker, catching bass unlaw- 
fully, fine and costs, $16.60. 

May 9, Chas. Lancaster, catching pike unlaw- 
fully, fine and costs, $25. 

June 2, *Gussippi Nacearoto, catching bass un- 
lawfully, fine and costs, $30. 

June 10, C. C. Cameron, hunting without li- 
cense, fine and costs, $26.60. 

June 11, Jas. Daugherty, catching bass unlaw- 
fully, fine and costs, $16.60. 

June 14, A. K. Smith, killing rabbits unlawfully, 
dismissed, insufficient evidence; no costs. 

June 25, *Steve Maxwell, dynamiting fish,, 15 
days in jail, fine and costs, $65.40. 

June 25, *Rube Maxwell, dynamiting fish, 15 
days in jail, fine and costs, $62.70. 

June 25, *Jasper Maxwell, dynamiting fish, 30 
days in jail, fine and costs, 62.70. 

June 25, *Bert Powell, dynamiting fish, 30 
days in jail, fine and costs, $62.70. 

July 31, *Frank Downey, hunting without li- 
cense, 15 days in jail, fine and costs, $26.60. 

July 31, *Frank Downey, killing squirrels un- 
lawfully, 15 days in jail, fine and costs, $90. 

Sept. 13, George Hall, killing squirrel unlaw- 
fully, 15 days in jail, fine and costs, $25. 

Sept. 20, *Italian, killing duck unlawfully, 15 
days in pail, fine and costs, $26.60. 

Total, $1,079.60. 

The 9 cases marked by a star were se- 
cured solely and entirely through the local 
chapter of the L. A. S. 



REPORT OF THE IDAHO DIVISION. 

In Governor Morrison's last message to 
the Legislature of Idaho he recommended 
that the office of State Game warden be 
abolished but through the influence of the 
members of the L. A. S. of this State the 
Legislature not only disregarded his recom- 
mendation but enacted an entirely new code 
of game laws, fixing the salary of the 
State game warden at $1,200 a year, and 
$600 for expenses. The new law also gives 
the State warden power to appoint one or 
more deputy State wardens for each county, 
at a salary of $3 a dav. not to exceed 90 
days. , The new law also provides for a 
resident hunting license of $1, and a non- 
resident license of $5 to fish or hunt small 
game, and a non-resident hunting license 
of $25 for all kinds of game. 

On or about April 15th, 1903, I received 
a letter from Mr. Ranshaw, a member of 
our League, at Clarkia, informing me that 
the Cceur d'Alene Log & Lumber Company 
had built a dam across the St. Mary's river, 
had not provided any fishway or ladder, and 
that the fish were unable to pass the dam ; 
also another dam across Emerald creek, 
which was not provided with either. I re- 
ferred the matter to State Game Warden 
W. B. Iorns, and he ordered the Lumber 
Company to build fish ladders on both 
dams immediately. On learning 2 weeks 
later that nothing had been done, I drove 
from Kendrick to Collins and from there 
traveled by trail to the upper St. Mary's, 
thence down the St. Mary's to the lower 
dam, a distance of nearlv 100 miles. At the 
dam I met the company's foreman who im- 



mediately proceeded to get out lumber and 
the following day we placed 2 fish lad- 
ders in the dam. From there I went to 
Emerald .creek dam where I put in one 
fish ladder. 

Later I was notified by one of our mem- 
bers that fish were being trapped on the 
upper Potlatch. This I investigated. I 
found 2. fish traps, which I tore out, but 
was unable to find evidence enough to 
prosecute ! 

One fish ladder was removed from the 
mill race at Juliaetta, Idaho. 

Several other lawbreakers have been 
prosecuted and our laws are now generally 
obeyed. 

The League is doing good work in this 
State, and I heartily endorse the official 
organ, Recreation. 

L. A. Kerr, Chief Warden. 



REPORT OF THE NEW JERSEY DIVISION. 

New Jersey was one of the first States 
in the Union to protect her fish and game. 
The law on this subject was passed Decem- 
ber 3, 1807, and is still in force. I allude to 
the act prohibiting fishing with nets in the 
Hackensack river, Bergen county. 

Our work for protection is done by 5 
Commissioners, one Fish and Game Protec- 
tor and 25 wardens. The Commissioners 
have authority to call on the sheriff of any 
county to assist them and their wardens in 
the performance of their duty. The com- 
missioners also have power to appoint dep- 
uty wardens. We spend annually about 
$50,000 for protection and in restocking the 
streams with fish and the fields with game. 

As far as prosecutions are concerned^ the 
month of November was the most success- 
ful in the history of the Commission. The 
principal work was guarding the ferries for 
non-resident gunners and preventing the 
removal of game from the State. That 
the wardens were active is clearly demon- 
strated by the fact that 136 arrests were 
made and that the fines imposed amounted 
to $4,233.12. The amount turned over by 
the' wardens was $1,411.04. 

Of the 136 arrests made, 128 were con- 
victed, 5 acquitted and 3 cases discontinued 
by order of the Commission. 

At least 80 per cent, of the men convicted 
are Italians. They are the worst game law 
violators we have to contend with. 

The $10 Reward signs furnished by the 
League have done more for the game than 
all the wardens in my county. I have tilled 
the country with these posters and the 
lawbreakers are on the lookout. At least 
75 per cent, of the arrests made in my 
county were made on evidence furnished 
by League members. 

Frank C. Wright, 
Delegate from New Jersey Division. 



AUTOMOBILE NOTES. 



Edited by J. A. Kingman. 



t 9 05 AUTOMOBILES. 

The 5th Annual Automobile Show will 
be held this month in Madison Square Gar- 
den, New York. This is an exhibit of na- 
tional prominence and interest. Other au- 
tomobile shows are held in the large cities 
during the year, but the New York show 
comes first, is the largest, and the most 
largely attended. It is the biggest event of 
the year for automobile manufacturers, for 
during automobile week they exhibit their 
models and sell them rapidly, both to agents 
and to private owners. The Automobile 
Show had a modest beginning 5 or 6 years 
ago and was then combined with the bicycle 
show, only a few crude and imperfect au- 
tomobiles being made at that tithe. 

Every year the Automobile Show has 
grown larger and more interesting; the 
machines have been greatly improved ; the 
number of automobilists has increased mar- 
velously, and the general public has become 
much more interested and intelligent re- 
garding motor vehicles. This year the ap- 
lication for space at the show in Madison 
Square Garden was greater than ever be- 
fore. 

Many new vehicles, showing steam, elec- 
tricity and gasolene powers, will be ex- 
hibited. The great popularity of the 
gasolene car is noticeable, and most of 
these vehicles for 1905 will be of the tour- 
ing type, seating 4 to 7 and 8 passengers. 
The runabout seems eclipsed for the pres- 
ent, and this is probably due to the fact 
that most people like to have a car which, 
although suitable for 2 persons and of good 
appearance under such condition, can at the 
same time be used for more when desired. 
The popular tonneau body for 1905 will 
have entrance at both sides instead of at 
the rear. The 4 cylinder motor will be 
popular, although single cylinder motors 
and double opposed motors will be numer- 
ous. 

Of course, the great popular question is 
price. The public wants to know how soon 
an automobile is to be made which will be 
within the reach of most people. There 
will certainly be nothing of that kind on 
the market for 1905. The bicycle business 
is responsible for a mistaken idea on the 
part of the public that the price of auto- 
mobiles will be cut in 2. When the bicycle 
first appeared it was heavy, clumsy, and 
the cost of manufacture was large. With 
a lighter structure and improved methods 
the price of the bicycle naturally dimin- 
ished, but it has not dropped much in the 
last 5 or 6 years. The automobile business 



at the start had the benefit of all the ex- 
perience gained in the bicycle business. 

The public ought to compare automobiles 
with horses and carriages, not with bicy- 
cles. Moreover, it must be considered that 
no good machinery can be made cheaply. 
Choice materials, good workmanship and 
careful construction cost the manufacturers 
much money. Automobiles must be built 
well, and even the cheapest - types require 
an amount of attention and inspection 
which would surprise the average person. 
Automobiles must be substantially built to 
endure a great deal of hard work, for the 
roads in our country are bad. It is likely 
that the biggest factor in reducing the price 
of automobiles will be the betterment of the 
roads. Runabouts in 1905 will cost about 
$650, and touring cars will cost $1,000 to 
$7,000, $8,000, or eVen more for some of 
the high power cars imported into this 
country. 

The life of an automobile depends large- 
ly on the care with which the wearing parts 
are cleaned and oiled. Plenty of the right 
kind of oil is necessary. Some people seem 
to think that it is only important to use 
enough oil. Not at*all. Every bearing is 
sure to wear a little, and when it does 
small particles of metal become dislodged, 
tending to wear the bearing all the more. 
Wash the bearings and chains of your au- 
tomobile frequently with kerosene and then 
replace with fresh oil. 

A new automobile club has recently been 
formed in New York City to meet a special 
need. The new organization is called the 
New York Motor Club, and is made up of 
persons who wish a place to meet, exchange 
views on automobiling, and work together 
to further its best interests. Many auto- 
mobilists believe in the future of such a 
club, which will have a la^ge, unrestricted 
membership, with low dues. 



GLOSSARY OF AUTOMOBILE TERMS. 

Bonnet : The thing that covers the en- 
gines. Some makers by lengthening it 
have found an economical substitute for 
horse power, besides providing a place 
where the motorist can get in out of the 
wet. It is usually so adjusted that when 
the motorist props it up to look inside, it 
falls and hits him on the head. This is an 
ingenious method of teaching him not to 
meddle with his engines. 

Ball Bearings : These are useful indica- 
tors, so fitted that when the car gets a 
shock they break. This enables the mo- 



ss 



5<S 



RECREATION. 



torist to know for certain whether his car 
has had a shock. 

Brasses : These are stuck about inside 
the works and should not be confounded 
with the brass plating. Things work on 
them ; and when you take them out it is 
well to put them back again in the same 
place. 

Chauffeur: A corruption of the term 
"shover," and applied to the driver because 
he is the only person who does not get out 
and shove when the car fails on a hill. 

Engine : This is a somewhat important 
part. It consists of a lot of little parts. If 
any of these drop off trouble may result. It 
is important to paint it, especially just be- 
fore selling your car. 

Garage : A place to tow broken down 
cars to, tip mechanics and pay bills at. 
There is reason to believe that had Ananias 
kept a garage he would have escaped the 
fate that befell' him, since most garage pro- 
prietors live to a good age. Barabbas would 
certainly have established a garage had that 
simple means of livelihood existed in his 
day. 

Ignition : There are 2 sorts, by trembler 
coil, plug and accumulator ; by magneto. 
The former is to be preferred, because if 
you hold on to the metal part of the plug 
and turn the handle you can feel the ex- 
act force of the current. To avoid a plug 
sooting, screw it in so that it is easily re- 
moved. Nothing will ever go wrong with 
it then. 

Owner : An inconvenient person, apt to 
want to ride in the car just when the chauf- 
feur is going out on a little trip of his own. 

Skid : This is a polite form of explain- 
ing how you came to run over anyone or 
into anything. If the car suddenly turns 
around without touching anything, it may 
also be a skid, but the police will call it a 
drunk in charge. 

Silencer : A thing hung under the car to 
hit dogs with. When efficiently designed 
it takes up all the row made by those parts 
of the car which make the least noise. It 
is a convenient receptacle for broken valve 
stems, etc. 

Starting Handle : The thing you wind up 
to make the car go. In single cylinder cars 
it often affords valuable physical exercise, 
but much can be done with it on big cars 
by advancing the ignition before turning. — 
Fred T. Jane, in The Car. 



ROADSIDE TROUBLES. 

The engine stops unexpectedly. The oc- 
cupants alight, raise the bonnet, and gaze 
hopelessly inside. One was recently over- 
heard to say, "There's the engine gone 
wrong again." After a silence the remark, 
"Let's have a look at the ," naming 



some part which happens to attract their 
attention, and immediately they seize span- 
ners and disintegrate the unfortunate ma- 
chine in places where there was, perhaps, 
little likelihood of trouble arising. If a 
doctor were called to attend a patient, it 
would be most serious if he should make a 
promiscuous inspection Of the human anat- 
omy "just to see if it is all right," with- 
out studying the symptoms of the case. It 
is the same with a motor. It is useless to 
take off the carburetor, alter the mixture, 
or grind in valves, if one of the bearings 
has seized up or the petrol tank has run 
dry. If the case were diagnosed systemati- 
cally the trouble in most instances would 
be easily found. — The Autocar. 



Some people spend more time in investi- 
gating automobiles to determine which 
make is best, than they do in learning 
how to run the machine after it has been 
bought. Know your car and its ways. 



A HERO. 



We saw the colonel on parade, 
A most imposing sight he made. 

His swelling chest, his bearing proud, 
His voice peremptory and loud, 
With awe inspired the gazing crowd. 

You really should have heard him when 
He shouted orders to his men. 

Yes, when he roared those orders out 
You should have seen them march about. 
In prompt compliance with his shout. 

Oh, very dignified was he — 
As martial as a man can be. 

So haughtily he held his head, 
His gills became so very red, 
So turky-cocky was his tread. 

We later saw him when he seemed 

Far meeker than we could have dreamed. 

His step was soft, his voice subdued, 
His ruddy cheek was chalky-hued, 
With terror he seemed quite imbued. 

In such a man as he 'twas queer, 
But he was overcome with fear. 

He born to threaten and command ! 
A rank poltroon with trembling hand, 
And knees that hardly let him stand. 

We marked his look of wild despair — 
We heard his wife's voice on the stair. 

— Chicago News. 



FORESTRY. . 

Tt takes 30 years to grow a tree and 30 minutes to cut it down and destroy it. 



WHITE PINE PLANTING. 

Destructive methods of lumbering, forest 
fires and the inability of white pine to re- 
produce itself under the intense shade of 
broad leaf trees have well nigh obliterated 
the species from the forest map of the great 
timber East. Immense areas of land for- 
merly clothed with the richest forest are 
now barren wastes, or are covered with less 
valuable woods. The increasing value of 
lumber and the worthlessness of this forest 
land for other purposes make the restora- 
tion of these pine forests an important eco- 
nomic consideration. 

Of particular interest is this pine plant- 
ing question to the farmer and the small 
owner. It may be many years before plant- 
ing on a large scale will be carried on by 
the lumberman, but there is no reason why 
the small owner should not gradually turn 
all of his unused land into a potentially 
valuable piece of property by planting it. 

On almost every farm there are at least 
a few acres which are valueless for other 
purposes than wood growth. The farmer 
need be at small expense in planting these 
tracts, for usually he can collect his own 
seed or young pine from neighboring pine 
woods. The value of such a plantation on 
the farm is not restricted to the actual quan- 
tity of posts, fuel and timber which it may 
produce. Frequently the cause of failure in 
orchards and various other perennial crops 
is the lack of protection from snow and 
wind in the winter. A combined woodlot 
and snowbreak, extending about the or- 
chard or field, will spread the snow evenly 
over the enclosure, where otherwise the 
wind would sweep the land, piling the snow 
in heaps about the fences, roads and trees. 
However, it is for timber production that 
we are most concerned in starting a plan- 
tation. 

In establishing a small plantation of only 
a few acres it would undoubtedly be best 
to buy the young pines from some reliable 
nursery man. Two year old seedlings are 
the best suited for such a purpose. They 
can be bought for $2 to $5 a thousand, de- 
pending on the demand and supply of the 
particular year. If it is intended to plant 
10 acres or more, it will be found more sat- 
isfactory and cheaper to raise one's own 
seedlings in a nursery bed, provided good 
wild seedlings can not be secured from 
neighboring woods. 

White pine seeds cost about $1.50 a pound 
when the seed is plentiful, that is, during 
a good seed year. There are about 28,800 
seeds to the pound, of which the percentage 
of germination is 70 to 90. If the seed is 



sown carefully in the nursery on suitable 
soil and cared for with as much pains as 
one would give to an ordinary vegetable 
garden, 50 per cent, of the seed may be ex- 
pected to produce seedlings which will live 
to' the transplanting age. 

The best way to grow the seedlings is in 
a bed prepared as one would prepare a 
flower bed, with boards around the sides to 
hold up the earth. The soil should be a 
deep, porous, sandy loam with an admix- 
ture of fresh humus, or vegetable mould. 
No fertilizer is necessary. Four feet is a 
handy width for the beds, which may be 
as long as desired. Two beds 4 feet wide 
and 24 feet long will produce sufficient 
healthy seedlings for a 10 acre plantation. 
About 2 .pounds of good seed will be re- 
quired. They should be planted in drills 
6 inches apart and about half an inch deep'. 
After covering the seeds, the beds should 
be rolled with a heavy roller and covered 
with a mulch of leaves until the young 
pines come up. The mulch should be kept 
fairly moist by sprinkling every day, but 
precaution must be used lest too much 
moisture rot the seeds. After the seeds 
are up, artificial shade should be given 
them by placing a frame covered with 
boughs or laths about 18 inches above the 
bed. The beds should be kept clear of 
weeds. During the first winter, the bed 
should be again covered with a mulch of 
leaves to prevent frost heaving the young 
plants. At the end of 2 years, the young 
seedlings are 5 to 8 inches high and are 
ready for planting. They should be care- 
fully removed from the bed so as not to 
injure their roots and put in a puddle of 
rich earth and water until they are set into 
their, future home. 

Opinions differ as to the best number to 
plant to the acre. Some plant them 6 and 
some 4 feet apart. Four feet apart in- 
sures better timber in the end. About 
2,700 seedlings to the acre are required, 
4 feet apart. They should be planted with 
a spade or a mattock. If a spade is used, 
make 2 incisions in the form of a T. In 
making the cross to the T bear down on 
the handle of the spade, which will lift 
the sod and leave a slit for the seedling. 
Be sure that the roots have plenty of room. 
With a little practice, an ordinary work- 
man can set out 100 to 150 seedlings an 
hour on ordinary unploughed pasture land. 
The seedlings should be set out in the 
spring, just before they begin to put out 
their spring growth. 

The plantation requires no further atten- 
tion for 10 or 15 years. If care is taken 



57 



58 



RECREATION. 



90 per cent, of the seedlings should live 
in the plantation. It is a good idea to go 
over the plantation in 3 years arfd set out 
new trees where any have not survived. 
When the trees average about 15 to 20 
feet in height, as they generally do when 
10 years old, it is a good plan to go through 
the plantation and cut off close to the bole 
all the limbs that can be reached with 
a hand ax. In pruning great care should 
be taken not to injure the bark. 

When the plantation is 15 to 20 years 
old, about one-half of the trees may be 
cut. They will make fence rails, posts or 
fuel and will be 4 to 5 inches in diameter, 
breast high. The second thinning should 
be made 40 or 50 years after planting and 
should take out about one-half the remain- 
ing trees. The average diameter on poor 
pasture land at 40 years will be 8 to 12 
inches, breast high, which will find a ready 
market as box- boards at $3 to $5 a cord 
on the stump. On the second cutting 25 
to 40 cords should be assured, which would 
leave approximately 600 good trees to ma- 
ture into first class timber. These trees 
may remain as long as the owner wishes, 
gaining in value constantly by the im- 
provement of the wood" in both quantity 
and quality. For the next 30 or 40 years 
the plantation will yield a sure income of 
5 per cent, per annum at compound inter- 
est in growth in volume alone. Besides 
this, the quality of the timber is constantly 
increasing as it increases in size. When, 
the remaining stand is 75 to 80 years old, 
the owner should be able to cut at least 
30,000 board feet an acre of good timber 
pine, which at present prices should bring 
$6 to $10 a 1,000 feet on the stump. It is 
not unfair to assume that the price of white 
pine 75 years hence will be at least twice 
what it is to-day, but figuring on present 
prices, the owner of our 10 acre planta- 
tion would have a trial balance something 
like the following: — 
Expenses. 

Value of land, 10 acres, at $4 $40 

Cost of seedlings 54 

Cost of planting 50 

Taxes for 70 years 60 

$204 
Returns. 
Value of land $40 

300 cords box lumber at $5 i>50O 

300,000 board feet timber at $8.... 2,400 



$3<94° 
Computing the original expense and the 
taxes at 4 per cent, compound interest, our 
original investment stands roughly at 
$1,800, which sum deducted from $3,040 
leaves $2,140, or a net annual return of 
about $3 an acre above the 4 per cent, com- 
pound interest, 



FORESTRY IN IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 

The turning out of skilled foresters is 
no inconsiderable part of the valuable work 
of the Bureau of Forestry. No profession 
is so little crowded, and none offers a more 
inviting field to the conscientious and zeal- 
ous student. That forestry, as a science es- 
sential to the well beiro- of the nation is 
steadily growing in popular favor is evi- 
denced by the increasing number of schools 
and professorships of forestry that are being 
established. The latest professorship is that 
at the agricultural college at Ames, Iowa, 
called the Iowa State College. To fill this 
position it has chosen Mr. Hugh P. Baker, 
of the Bureau of Forestry. Mr. Baker is a 
graduate of the Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege and the Yale Forest School, and has 
had a wide experience in handling problems 
in forestry in the West. He will lecture at 
the college half of each year on general 
forestry in its application to Iowa condi- 
tions. The other half of the year he will 
devote to Bureau work, for the most part 
investigating forest problems as they con- 
cern the State of Iowa. 



CHESTNUTS. 

In the fall the dark Italian 

Sells his wares ; 
And the man who buyeth chestnuts 

Roundly swears — 
Giving vent to many a strong and 

Angry term — 
Nearly every doggone chestnut 

Has a worm. 

Loud he says he ? ll never purchase 

Nut again, 
And repeats with variations 

This refrain ; 
But ere long he buyeth others 

Fine and firm, 
And on opening up the first one 

Finds a worm. 

Thus we pass, attentive reader. 

On our way ; 
Taken in, we're done with trusting 

Loud we say. 
But forgetting, ah ! how often 

Do we squirm 
When we ope and in life's chestnut 

Find a worm ! 

— Louisville Courier- Journal. 



It was on the old campground. "Pass de 
hat," suggested Bruddah Wheatly. But the 
parson said, "No, sah ; dere'll De no hats 
about it. Pass a tin box wid a chain to it. 
De las' time a hat was passed around heah 
it never came back, an' I had to go home 
bar'headed." — Chicago News, 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 

Edited by C. F. Langworthy, Ph.D. 
Author of "On Citraconic, Itaconic and Mesaconic Acids," "Fish as Food," etc. 

"What a Man Eats He Is." 



TEA PRODUCTION IN BRITISH POSSES- 
SIONS. 

In a paper on British grown tea, read be- 
fore the Society of Arts in London, Mr. A. 
G. Stanton stated that the total quantity of 
tea exported in 1902 from all tea producing 
countries was, in round numbers, 615,000,000 
pounds, of which India and Ceylon togetlier 
contributed more than one-half. The area 
devoted to tea in India rose from 125,000 
acres in 1875 to 284,000 acres in 1885, and 
to 525,000 acres in 1902. In 1880 the tea 
plantations of Ceylon occupied only 9,000 
acres. Ten years later they covered 220,000 
acres, and in 1903 their extent was 386,000 
acres. 

Speaking. of the efforts to obtain a market 
for Ceylon tea in the United States, Mr. 
Stanton said it soon became apparent that 
if the American market was to be captured, 
''determined efforts must be made for the 
possession of the market for green and un- 
colored tea. Hence Ceylon planters, out of 
a tax raised by government, decided to give 
a bounty for making suitable green or un- 
colored tea. This resulted in small quanti- 
ties being manufactured ; and a trade gradu- 
ally grew up, until last year the bounty was 
paid on 11,119,766 pounds, and a large mar- 
ket has at last been found in North America 
for this class of tea." 

India, too, it is claimed, is beginning to 
increase her production of green tea as the 
result of a bounty, first offered in 1901 ; and 
this bounty was paid last year on 1,891,914 
pounds of such tea. India has also offered 
a bounty for the production of Oolong tea, 
in the hope of further increasing her sup- 
ply of teas suitable "for consumption in 
North America." 

The consumption of tea is larger, it would 
appear, in Great Britain than in most other 
countries ; though the Australasian colonists 
appear to be larger tea consumers than the 
people of the mother country. The figures 
given on comparative consumption per capita 
were the following : Australasia 7 pounds, 
Great Britain 6 pounds, Canada nearly 4 
pounds, the Netherlands i l / 2 pounds, Russia 
about i^4 pounds, and the United States 
about one pound. 

The production of tea in Java amounted 
in 1890 to about 7,000,000 pounds, but has 
increased until it now amounts to nearly 
20,000,000 pounds a year. 

The British colony of Natal has at pres- 
ent 3,542 acres devoted to tea, and, with a 
duty of 12 cents a pound on imported tea, 
and a customs union securing free access to 



the markets of Cape Colony, Orange River 
Colony, and the Transvaal, it finds ready 
sale in South Africa for the limited produce 
of its plantations. 

Tea growing has been tried in Jamaica, 
Fiji, Borneo, Mauritius, and the Straits 
Settlements, but has not gone beyond the 
experimental stage except in the last named, 
where about 35,000 pounds were produced 
in 1902. Jamaica has, however, about 75 
acres in tea plantations. 



MACARONI MAKING. 

Real macaroni is made of hard wheat of 
a semi-translucent sort, which grows in 
Southern Europe and Algeria, and which 
is richer in gluten and other nitrogenous 
matter than soft wheat. Macaroni is noth- 
ing but flour and water, but it must be 
carefully made. The best flour for making 
it is, coarsely ground and called "semo- 
lina." The flour is mixed with boiling 
water in a cylinder which converts it into 
stiff paste. Then it is rolled under a huge 
granite wheel which flattens it into a 
smooth mass. The man at the wheel cuts 
1 into squares and claps it under the wheel 
again and again until it is . thoroughly 
kneaded. 

According to the writer quoted, the 
dough then goes into an upright metal 
cylinder closed at the lower end with a 
thick disk of copper. This is pierced with 
openings, through which a plunge piston 
squeezes the dough into threads. The 
threads are cut off at regular lengths 
and handed to a man who hangs them 
on wooden drying rods. In making spa- 
ghetti the holes are small and the dough 
comes out in solid strings. In the manu- 
facture of macaroni the holes are larger 
and centered by mandrels which make the 
tubes hollow. Macaroni is also made into 
pastes of various shapes, alphabets and thin 
strips, cut by machinery. 

When the macaroni is -shaped, it is sent 
up into a drying room, the small pieces in 
trays, the long strips of vermicelli, the thin, 
solid strips of spaghetti, and the large 
hollow tubes of macaroni on long poles the 
size of a broomstick. Here a current of 
air dries the paste. Genuine macaroni al- 
ways shows the bent ends where the long 
hairpin shaped lengths have been hung 
over the poles. Cheap imitations are made 
from common flour, which is not glutinous 
enough to bear its own weight, and, there- 
fore, is dried flat. 



59 



6o 



RECREATION. 



MANUFACTURE OF SAGE CHEESE. 

Sage cheese, with its yellow surface mot- 
tled and flecked with small dark grayish 
spots, is an old time favorite. Sage is an 
old seasoning herb and sage cheese is proba- 
bly of early English origin. The manufac- 
ture of sage cheese is now carried on in a 
limited way only and is restricted to certain 
localities, yet many people are exceedingly 
fond of it, and will pay more for it than 
for ordinary cheese. 

The Michigan Experiment Station has 
studied the subject of cheese making, and 
states that this cheese is made in exactly 
the same way as chedder, that is, common 
American factory cheese, differing from it 
only in possessing a sage flavor, which is 
imparted to it by adding sage extract or 
sage tea to the milk before the curd is pre- 
cipitated ; by adding the extract to the curd 
before salting; or by adding sage leaves 
to the curd before salting. 

The addition of sage tea or extract to 
the milk is objectionable, requiring 10 to 12 
ounces for 1,000 pounds of milk. 

The addition of extract to the curd gave 
entirely satisfactory results in tests at the 
station when the extract was not too dilute 
and when it was added .cautiously to prevent 
waste. The quantity of sage required was 6 
or 7 ounces for 1,000 pounds of milk. , 

The most satisfactory method was found 
to be the old fashioned way of adding the 
sage leaves to the curd. This required the 
least sage, 3 ounces being sufficient for the 
curd from 1,000 pounds of milk. In follow- 
ing this method the sage should be weighed, 
the stems picked out and the leaves pow- 
dered and added to the curd before salting. 



ARTIFICIAL CANNED SALMON. 

Mr. Homer Sheridan, of Mt. Clemens, 
Mich., writes me enclosing a clipping from 
his paper, the Mt. Clemens Daily Leader, 
which states that 2 companies have been 
formed there for the purpose of seining 
carp and shipping them East, where they 
are stained, canned and sold to the gullible 
public as salmon. Mr. Sheridan states that 
these carp fishermen have agreed to return 
to the water all bass taken in their nets. 
but it safe to assume that this agreement 
will be violated every day. Besides, it is 
said that the lead lines of the seines, in be- 
ing dragged over the spawning beds of the 
bass, destroy vast quantities of spawn. An 
effort will be made to secure the enactment 
of a law by the Michigan Legislature to 
prohibit seining during June, July and Au- 
gust, the spawning season of the bass. 

This is another proof of the crying need 
for enactment and enforcement of pure 
food laws in all the States. I have recently 
reported that many tons of sturgeon and 
catfish are being taken in various parts of 
the country, stained, canned and labeled 



salmon. Now comes the mud-eating carp. 
If the American people would only read 
what is being printed for their benefit on 
the subject of foods they would not buy 
canned goods unless there was some guar- 
anty that they were pure and true to name. 
Marketing other canned fish as salmon fur 
nishes another reason for insisting on the 
enactment and enforcement of pure food 
and game laws. The taking of salmon for 
canning should be so regulated that this 
valuable fish may not be exterminated. 



THE VEGETARIAN'S GLOAT. 
I am a vegetarian, 
No heifer fed barbarian ! 
I live on things agrarian, 

But never fool with meat. 
I'm one of those that like, you see, 
The grass that lines the pike, you see ; 
And so this packers' strike, you see, 

To me is quite a treat. 

I laugh to think of those who eat 

That horrid, germ-fraught stuff called meat. 

All now ashake from head to feet, 

For fear of rising prices. 
No odds to us if beef should be 
Two sixty-five a pound, for we 
Don't eat the dirty stuff, you see, 

But live on grains and rices. 

I thought this morning, as I lay 

And hungered for my breakfast hay, 

How, ere the closing of the day, 

The price of pork might rise ; 
I pitied all who didn't know 
How nicely ragweed pork chops go 
When one is tired a bit ; and oh 

The taste of pecan pies ! 

We oft eat roasts of who knows what 
Served up to us all piping hot 
And "steaks" consisting of a lot 

Of weeds we can not name ; 
A consomme of maple limbs, 
A puree made of Watts' hymns — 
These soups delight our fats and slims 

And eke our halt and lame. 

While they who long for flesh are gaunt 
Because of meat there is a want, 
Gur sirloin cabbages we flaunt, 

And liver made of radish ; 
We stuff on sausage made of oats 
Instead of fragments saved from shoats ; 
On string bean hash each veggy dotes — 

Some people say we're faddish. 

Head cheese we make from barley polls, 
From cowslips we construct veal rolls, 
That you could not, to save your souls. 

From real meat discern. 
In brief, to make a long tale short. 
We don't eat naught we hadn't ort ; 
And if no meat should reach our port 

We wouldn't yearn a yearn. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



AMERICAN SMALL ARMS. 

The sportsmen and military men of this 
country have long needed a complete and 
exhaustive history of the development of 
American firearms and nothing of the kind 
has ever been published until recently. A ' 
few years ago Major Edward S. Farrow, of 
the U. S. Army, began the collection of 
material bearing on this subject, and the 
result is now placed before the public in a 
book of 400 pages entitled "American Smalt 
Arms." 

The descriptions in this volume are, as 
the title indicates, limited to arms made or 
patented in this country, and to a few for- 
eign weapons which have become Ameri- 
canized, such as the Ferguson and the Mau- 
ser rifles. 

Major Farrow has covered in his re- 
search every type of firearm used in hunt- 
ing, in military service or in target shooting, 
from the ancient flintlock musket of the 
Colonial days down to the modern high 
power breech loading sporting and military 
rifles; from the big, clumsy horse pistol 
down to the modern automatic Colt; from 
the long single barrel muzzle loading shot 
gun down to the modern breech loading 
double gun of to-day. He has described 
and illustrated many types in so practical 
and simple a way as to leave little to be 
desired on the part of the student of the 
art of gun making. 

Major Farrow has also given a complete 
history of the developments in ammunition, 
from the days of the old powder horn and 
bullet mould down to the modern high 
power metallic cartridges, and gives an ex- 
haustive treatise on the subject of reloading 
modern shells. 

The subject of revolver shooting is also 
fully and minutely discussed and illustrated. 

In fact, Major Farrow's present work 
may be termed a complete encyclopedia of 
small arms and ammunition, and every 
sportsman, every soldier and every naval 
officer who desires to know all there is to 
know about his chosen sport or profession 
should study this work carefully. 

The price of the book is $5, and it is 
published by The Bradford Company, 143 
Liberty street, New York City. 



THE WITCHERY OF SLEEP. 

Ostermoor & Company, 116 Elizabeth 
street, New York city, makers of the fa- 
mous Ostermoor mattresses, have gone into 
a new line. They have recently published a 
book entitled "The Witchery of Sleep," 
which is a genuine work of art and is com- 
posed of a collection of poems and prose 



articles by the world's greatest authors on 
this always interesting subject. Among the 
writers whose works are published in this 
book are Shakespeare, Keats, Wordsworth, 
Shelley, Ben Johnson, Longfellow, Byron, 
Browning, Tom Hood, Edgar Fawcett, 
Scott, Edward Everett Hale, Dr. Cyrus Ed- 
son and others of equal prominence. 

The book is exquisitely illustrated, printed 
on heavy paper and, in fact, is a gem of 
workmanship. 

Ostermoor & Company tell me they are 
printing 50,000 copies of this book and that 
a copy will hereafter be given to each per- 
son who buys an Ostermoor mattress. 
While this arrangement will not induce any 
one to buy a mattress, it illustrates the 
liberal methods of this house and indicates 
that these people expect to sell 150,000 mat- 
tresses within the next year or 2; and they 
will do it. They know how to advertise, 
and people who make good goods and ad- 
vertise them right always sell them in great 
quantities. 

You can get an illustrated circular of 
the book by writing Ostermoor & Company 
and mentioning Recreation. 

The regular price <of "The Witchery of 
Sleep" is $2 a copy, but it will be sold at 
$1.50 to persons who mention Recreation 
when ordering a copy. 



61 



THE OLD MADE NEW. 

Jessie Emerson Moffat undoubtedly yield- 
ed to a popular weakness when she deter- 
mined to write an historical novel, but her 
intellectual kinship with the hosts of simi- 
lar writers went no farther. "A Friend at 
Court," is that seeming impossibility, an 
historical romance with a new, fresh plot. 

The "friend at court" is Mme. de Main- 
tenon, trusted counselor and comrade of 
Louis XIV, of France. The hero and hero- 
ine of the clever story, Francois de Mow- 
bray and Marguerite de la Verge, have been 
betrothed since childhood, but they only 
meet, under disguised identity, when one is 
an ardent advocate of the royalist, the other 
of the Huguenot cause. The plot is too 
good to spoil by further recapitulation, but 
love, romance, abundant action, sword play 
and even tragedy combine to maintain 
varied but unbroken interest to the last 
chapter. Incidentally both Louis XIV. and 
Mme. de Maintenon grow unwontedly real 
in the telling, with other clever character 
sketches of varied excellence. He who 
loves a lover and he who enjoys exciting 
reading will alike rejoice in and over "A 
Friend at Court." 

The style of the book is fair, the situa- 



62 



RECREATION. 



tions are surprising, cleverly handled, 
worked out to fitting and logical conclusion. 
A bit of stirring pleasure may be rendered 
inevitable by the perusal of this pleasant 
tale. 

"A Friend at Court," by Jessie Emerson 
Moffat. William Ritchie, New York, $1.50. 



OF INTEREST TO PHYSICIANS. 

Dr. Bayard Holmes has written a trea- 
tise on "Appendicitis and Other Diseases 
About the Appendix," which has recently 
been published by D. Appleton & Co., of 
New York and Chicago. 

Dr. Holmes is one of the prominent sur- 
geons of Chicago and has for several years 
past occupied the positions of Professor of 
Surgery in the University of Illinois, of 
Clinical Surgery in the American Mission- 
ary College, Chicago, and Attending Sur- 
geon in the Chicago Baptist Hospital. His 
present work may, therefore, be. accepted as 
that of a master in his profession. 

The book contains 368 pages, and pre- 
sents in full the more important and the 
more imminent conditions calling for surgi- 
cal relief. Each topic is illustrated by 
abundant clinical reports, which are intro- 
duced in order to make the presentation as 
vivid and lasting as possible. The work is 
largely based on the author's experience, 
especially in diagnosis and indications for 
treatment. It presents the unclouded picture 
of the disease with all its threatening pos- 
sibilities, and shows in an orderly and logi- 
cal manner the attitude of the physician 
toward the first and each subsequent mani- 
festation of the disease. It puts before him 
the dangers which threaten the patient, and 
calls attention to the errors into which the 
attending physician is likely to be led. This 
book should certainly be in the library of 
every surgeon in the country. 



"The Sea-Wolf," Jack London's new 
novel, is the story of a terrible captain of 
a sealing schooner, who exercises to 
the full his power over the lives and for- 
tunes of those who come within his reach. 
Wild and even gruesome incidents abound, 
but the author is justified in almost pass- 
ing the limits of the artistic by his desire to 
show the full worthlessness of those modern 
fetiches, strenuosity and human will power. 
This is especially interesting because Jack 
London is commonly regarded as the apos- 
tle of human daring, and his imagination 
touches the bounds of physical enduiance 
and achievement. That he is really en- 
listed on the side of the spirit should make 
him a man of the future as well as of the 
present. 

"The Sea-Wolf" is published by The 
Macmillan Company, New York and Lon- 
don; price, $1.50. 



Wycil & Co., 83 Nassau St., New York, 
have issued a vest-pocket book entitled 
"The A. B. C. of Swimming," which is the 
best thing in its class I have ever read. 
The instructions are simple, explicit, yet 
complete, and any person who has ordi- 
narily good sense can, by studying this 
hand book a few hours and then following 
its teachings a few days or nights in a 
swimming pool or a lake or a stream, be- 
come a good swimmer. 

Every man, woman and child should be 
able to swim and those who do not know 
how should read this book. 



Viola Roseboro, a retired actress, has 
written a book entitled "Players and Vaga- 
bonds," which is printed by the Macmil- 
lan Co., New York. The book is a collec- 
tion of personal reminiscences of people, 
plays and incidents met with by the author 
in the course of several years on the stage 
and on the road. The stories are well told 
and are worth reading. They will appeal 
alike to people in front of and behind the 
curtain, to theatre goers and those who 
entertain them. The book sells at $1.50. 



Nice Old Lady— Will you kindly tell me 
if the lady who writes "The Mothers' 
Page" every week in your paper is in? I 
want to tell her how much I have enjoyed 
reading her articles on "The Evening Hour 
in the Nursery." 

Office Boy — That's him over there with 
the pink shirt smoking a pipe. — The Yazoo 
Bazoo. * 



Wildrake — I bucked up against a faro 
game last night. 

Ascum (sarcastically) — And broke the 
bank, eh? 

Wildrake— Yes, I did this morning. I 
suppose Willie will cry, but I simply had to 
have car fare. — Philadelphia Ledger. 

Sharpe — Here I see I am referred to in 
the paper again. 

Blunt — W-w-what ? 

Sharpe (reading aloud) — "It is estimated 
that there are 80 millions of people in the 
United States." And I'm one of the lot— 
Exchange. 



A leopardess said to her mate, 
"We may be a little bit late 

For the animal show, 

But, really, you know, 
I must see if my spots are on straight." 

■ — Cleveland Leader. 



A little bird sat on a telegraph wire, 
And said to its mates, gathered there, 

"When wireless telegraphy comes into use 
We'll all have to sit on the air." 

— The Gateway. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



RATIONAL TREATMENT OF DISEASE. 

The rational treatment of disease is based 
on the use of powerful but harmless anti- 
septics ; that is, remedies which destroy 
germs without injuring the patient. 

Trial and test through ' 15 years have 
proven that Hydrozone and Glycozone are 
the only remedies to which this theory is 
entirely applicable. 

Hydrozone is recognized by leading phys- 
icians as the most powerful bactericide 
known. 

Experiments made by bacteriologists have 
proven beyond doubt that Hydrozone does 
not injure nor destroy healthy tissues ; that 
it immediately destroys microbes; that 
when taken internally its effect on the gen- 
eral health is entirely harmless ; and that it 
stimulates the building of new, healthy 
tissues. 

In order to prove the correctness of these 
statements, Prof. Charles Marchand, at 57- 
K Prince street, New York, will send you, 
free, trial bottles of Hydrozone and Glyco- 
zone, on receipt of 35 cents to prepay ex- 
pressage. On request he will send you a 
pamphlet containing convincing evidence of 
the results obtained by others, and full in- 
structions in the use of these valuable rem- 
edies that no one should be without. 



THE FARTHEST POINT SOUTH. 

The completion of the St. Louis, Browns- 
ville and Mexico railway has opened a new 
hunting country in Southern Texas along 
the Gulf coast between Corpus Christi and 
Brownsville. Deer, peccaries, bear, wild 
ducks, geese, quails, turkeys and plover are 
said to be abundant in that region, while 
the winter weather there is like September 
or October in the North. 

Appreciating the attractiveness of their 
territory in this respect, the officers of the 
St. L., B. & M. Ry. have obtained recog- 
nition for Brownsville as a winter tourist 
point, which gives sportsmen the advantage 
of much lower rates than they could other- 
wise get. Heretofore Corpus Christi has 
claimed to be the farthest point South in 
the United States to which these rates ap- 
plied. The recognition of Brownsville, the 
Southernmost point in Uncle Sam's domain 
and 150 miles South of Corpus Christi an- 
nihilates this preference and at the same 
time opens the portals of a new found 
sportsmen's paradise. 

The winter tourist rates apply from in- 
terstate points during the fall and winter 
months. 



films, etc., did not realize that he was at 
the same time catering to the wants of 
shooters ; but he was, all the same. These 
Push Pins are the neatest and handiest con- 
trivance I have ever seen for attaching 
paper targets to a target frame, a tree, a 
fence or wherever else you may wish to put 
one. The Push Pins are made of glass, 
with a fine sharp steel point moul-ded in. 
There is a good, comfortable handle to each 
pin, by which you can easily drive the pin 
into even hard wood, and you can readily 
pull it out again when you wish to take the 
target down. 

These Push Pins are made by the East- 
man Kodak Co., Rochester, N. Y., and re- 
tail at 20 cents a dozen. If you will get 
a dozen of them you will find them exceed- 
ingly useful, not only in target shooting but 
in the dark room, in case you are a photog- 
rapher, and in many other ways. In order- 
ing please mention Recreation. 



Augusta, Ga. 
Robin Hood Powder Co., Swanton, Vt., 

Dear Sirs, I have been reading some 
articles in Recreation as to the work done 
by your shells, and wish to call your at- 
tention to a case coming under my own 
observation while in Evans, Ga., a little 
town a few miles away, and, by the way, 
a place where smokeless shells had never 
been sold. Having a few samples with me, 
I gave one to a merchant of the place and 
asked him to make a test of it. Our 
target, placed about 25 or 30 yards across 
the main road, was the head of a mackerel 
barrel, made of oak. The gun used was 
a 10 bore and the shell 12 gauge, chilled 
shot. To our astonishtnent, after picking 
the shot from the target, they were, in 
every instance, in perfect condition. This 
result caused the merchant to place a 
sample order for 1,000 shells. Your Robin 
Hood shells evidently are winners, and our 
concern will do our best in placing them 
before the public. 

D. P. O'Connor. 



The man who devised the Kodak Push 
Pin, for the use of photographers in holding 



The Northwestern School of Taxidermy, 
Omaha, Nebraska, is worthy the support of 
all sportsmen. By taking the mail course 
from this school anyone will become pro- 
ficient in taxidermy, thus being able to 
mount and preserve birds, animals, and 
other trophies that may be legitimately se- 
cured in hunting. Hundreds of sportsmen 
are now doing their own taxidermy, and it 
seems a most desirable accomplishment to 
lovers of outdoor sports. The school an- 
nounces in its ad that it will send its illus- 
trated circular free to readers of Recrea- 



63 



64 



RECREATION. 



tion. Write for a circular, as it will inter- 
est you. 



The Prudential Insurance Company of 
America received the Grand Prize and a 
Gold Medal at the St. Louis Exposition for 
its exhibit illustrating the Company's busi- 
ness methods and vast and successful re- 
sults. 

This award makes the Prudential the 
most highly honored insurance institution 
in the world. No other life insurance com- 
pany has ever received a corresponding 
award, » although numerous exhibits have 
been made by insurance companies in the 
United States and Europe. The award was 
granted by a jury of qualified experts. 



The Ithaca Gun Company has recently 
put on the market a featherweight gun in 
all grades of hammerless, and is now pre- 
pared to build a 12 gauge, 26 inch or 28 
inch gun weighing 6 pounds, 6 ounces to 
6 pounds, 10 ounces. The barrels on these 
guns are as thick and strong as those of the 
ordinary yy 2 pound gun, the weight being 
saved in other parts of the gun where 
it is not needed. It is no longer ne- 
cessary for the American shooter to pay 
30 per cent, duty on a gun made in another 
country, when he needs a light weight field 
eun. 



Leeds & Lippincott, owners of the Had- 
don Hall Hotel at Atlantic City, N. J., are 
the first in the field with a 1905 calendar. 
It is got up in the same dainty, artistic 
manner as their previous issues, and thou- 
sands of Recreation readers know by ex- 
perience what that means. The Haddon 
Hall calendar is about the size of a postal 
card, hence is convenient for desk use. A 
postal card mentioning Recreation and 
sent to Leeds & Lippincott will get you a 
copy. 



At the Western Texas League shoot, 
July 14-16, inclusive, M. E. Atchison, shoot- 
ing the Parker gun, broke 648 out of a 
possible 700. In the Schmelzer cup event 
Mr. Atchison broke 50 straight. For the 
Hunter Arms Company cup Mr. Atchison 
broke 24 out of 25. For 3 different prizes 
Mr. Atchison broke 99 out of a possible 100. 
There were a number of Parker guns at this 
shoot, and they did good work. Such scores 
as the foregoing keep increasing and add 
evidence to the reliability and effectiveness 
of the Old Reliable Parker. 



Charlottesville, Va. 
West End Furniture Co., Williamsport, Pa., 
Gentlemen : The sportsman's cabinet 
reached me safe. It is a beautiful _ speci- 
men of the cabinet maker's art and is well 
up to your printed description. It affords 



room for my guns, fishing tackle, hunting 
and fishing clothes, shoes, and odds and 
ends generally; and, what especially ap- 
peals to a married man, puts these out of 
the way and reach of the Missus and the 
kids. Yours truly, 

W. M. Lile. 



The Ideal Manufacturing Co., of New 
Haven, Conn., has put out still another new 
revolver bullet, which is fully described and 
illustrated in a circular that the company 
will soon issue. Revolver shooters are 
thoroughly progressive, up-to-date men, and 
are interested in every new device intended 
to facilitate in any way their chosen sport. 
Therefore, all revolver shooters should get 
copies of this circular. In writing for it 
please mention Recreation. 



The G. W. Cole Co., 141 Broadway, New 
York, has issued a book telling all about 
"3 In One" oil, giving instructions as to 
the best methods of using it, and a list of 
a great.number of machines and other things 
on which it may be advantageously used. 

The pamphlet really gives a great fund 
of valuable information, and a copy of it, 
together with a sample of the oil, will be 
sent to any person asking for them and 
mentioning Recreation. 



Charles Payne, of Wichita, Kansas, sends 
out a circular stating that he is again in a 
position to fill orders for a limited number 
of live quail for propagating purposes. Per- 
sons who desire stock for this purpose are 
therefore advised to communicate with him 
at once. 



The International Jury of the St. Louis 
World's Fair, has awarded the Grand 
Prize to the exhibit of the C. P. Goerz 
Optical Works for their various photo- 
graphic lenses. 

Stranger: Do express trains stop here? 

Big Hank (station agent) : Only fer 
railway officials an' train-robbers. — Ex- 
change. 

He : I love you enough to wait for you 
a thousand years. 

She : And I love you enough to marry 
you to-day. — Life. 



"Tommy Taddells," said the teacher of 
the grammar class, "what is the feminine 
of 'vassal?' " 

"Vassaline, ma'am," replied Tommy 
promptly. — Judge. 



Nodd — How is your boy getting along in 
politics? 

Todd — First rate. The papers have 
taken him up. and are beginning to de- 
nounce him. — Exchange. 



EDITOR'S CORNER, 

a disgrace to Massachusetts. offer us protection ! Yes, such protect 

Charlton, October 27. The Charlton Fish tion as vultures give to lambs, cover- 

and Game Protective Association is prepar- • and dev0 uring them I" 
ing for a big game hunt, the like of which ^ & 

has never before been known in Charlton, lhe despatch says, regarding; this 
and possibly not in Southern Worcester side hunt, that it is an undertaking 
county.— Special to the Worcester Tele- « t h e like of which has never before 
? rap " been known in Charlton." I should 
Occasionally a good family finds it- hope not ! But it is too much to hope 
self possessed of one black sheep that it may never be repeated. At this 
member, who does all sorts of dis- l a te day there is absolutely no excuse 
graceful things, and seems to bear no f or such a thing as a side hunt in Mas- 
real relationship to his parents, or to' sachusetts, or in any other civilized 
his brothers and sisters. Sometimes community. Apparently, it is neces- 
the case of atavism is so strong that sary that every State in the Union 
we behold in the 20th century a re- should enact laws prohibiting side 
flection of the brutality of 300 years hunts ; for otherwise, like smallpox 

a &°- and hog cholera, side hunts will con- 

The side hunt at Charlton takes us t [ nue to t, rea k out where least ex _ 

back to the days of witch burning at pec ted, even as in Charlton, Massa- 

Salein, and proves that the ancient chusetts. 

spirit of ignorance and brutality is not My game hog register is g row ing at 
even yet wholly dead in Massachu- an a i armmg rate> but it is built on the 
setts, Had. a • side hunt occurred in expansive plan and room can be made 
the Indian Territory, among the for all the names that may come> This 
squawmen and Yahoos of Hartshorne, Charlton herd down in the fol _ 
who recently assauted Colonel C. O. i ow i ng - order • 
Shepherd in such a brutal and cow- 
ardly manner, I should not have been Jfilo H. Nichols 1,064 

J • 1 u , .. • 1,1 • • Everett Pike 1,065 

surprised ; but it is both surprising s Graton ^ 

and painful to know that a large com- Frank Knight i'o67 

pany of native Americans, living in Warren J. Harrington 1,068 

enlightened Massachusetts, could de- £. F. Putnam 1,069 

11 , • Harry Stevens 1,070 

scend so low as to engage m a prac- Alan * on Burlingame ^ 

tice that is now condemned by all de- Andrew Burlingame 1,072 

cent men. I can understand how ig- Frank Myers 1,073 

no rant Italians from the mountains of ^. H - ^p^ n ' • l,0>7 ^ 

Sicily can believe it right to shoot ££rence knight' \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\^\\\\%l 

every wild creature that can be found ; Alvin H. Clark 1,077 

but for men bearing such names as Jonas Bemis 1,078 

Pike, Holmes, Putnam, Knight, Clark, f^AY^n™™^ 1 080* 

Osgood, Gould, Hitchcock and East- A°rthur Whitcomb ".'.'.'.'.WW'.'. '. ...... '.'.\%i 

man, to a total of 80 or thereabout, to E. W. Blood, Jr 1,082 

engage in such a proceeding as the Paul Lucier ..: : 1,083 

side hunt described, is enough to bring £red Osgood 1,084 

A . ■ . \ ■ . . . ' jt 11 r William White 1,085 

the blush of shame to the cheek 01 any William LePrade 1,086 

American citizen. To think of such an John Hammond 1,087 

act of vandalism being committed by Frank Brown 1,088 

the Charlton Fish and Game Protec- Vernon ^tt^ 1,089 

tive Association ! Well may the wild p re(i Young WWWWWWWWWWW. '. . '. . . . . . 1,091 

creatures of Charlton exclaim, 'They Harry Foote 1^092 

65 



66 



RECREATION. 



George H. Watson . » » . » » 1*093 Such rules and regulations are to be sub- 
Edward White 1,094 mitted to and approved by the President of 

Herman Cudworth 1,095 the United States and shall thereafter be, 

Henry Harwood 1,096 in effect, the law of the United States for 

Robert D. Kelley . . 1,097 tne protection and preservation of such mi- 

F. H. C. Merriam 1,098 gratory birds. 

H. H. Slayton 1 099 It is a well known fact that Congress and 

M. W. Carpenter 1,100 the Supreme Court have always regarded 

John Vigeart 1,101 the game existing in any State as belonging 

George C. Clark 1,102 to the people of that State, in their corpo- 

C. W. Pike 1,103 rate capacity, and Congress has heretofore 

G. T. Comins 1,104 declined to interfere with State rights ;n 

W. H. Gould ..1,105 the game, within the individual States. 

H. C. Brown 1,106 Mr. Shiras holds, however, that migratory 

H. C. Putnam 1,107 birds do not come within this definition and 

Herbert Osgood 1,108 that Congress may safely and justly assume 

H. K. Davidson 1,109 to protect such birds and to enact laws to 

F. R. Hammond 1,110 that end. 

Lewis Baker 1,1 ri Mr. Shiras is one of the most prominent 

Frank W. Bullard I,IP2 lawyers in Pennsylvania and for 20 years 

J. Frank Stone 1.113 has been a careful and diligent student of 

E. A. Lamb J,n,4 constitutional law. He believes his position 

Walter N.-Cook i,ii-5 in this matter is thoroughly within the 

George B. Hammond .1,116 meaning and effect of the Constitution and 

G. C. Prindle 1,117 bis view of the matter is certainly soun'd 

Lucien Knight 1,118 and logical. 

H. S. Hitchcock 1,119 It is hoped his bill may receive the active 

George Hammond 1,120 and earnest support of ail friends of game 

E. F. Blood 1,121 preservation in the United States and that 

E. D. Blood 1,122 it may be promptly enacted into law. All 

G. F. Pickering 1,123 readers of Recreation who agree with this 

F. L. Olney 1,124 view are, therefore, earnestly advised and 

J. F. Caderette 1,125 urged to write their Senators and Congress- 
George N. Tucker 1,126 men at once, urging prompt and favorable 

W. C. Brown 1,127 action on House Bill No. 15,601. 

P. W. Sheridan 1,128 

O F. Morris 1,129 FAIRS MUST ADVERTISE. 

W.L.Baker 1,130 . -.. . 

Zeb Bettis ...1131 *'he ^ Louis .bair is a thing of history 

Charles Ryan'].'.'!.']'..'!'. !!!i]i32 an< ^ w *^ n °t cut half so large a figure in 

E. W. Huntley ' ! '.!!'. 11 33 *he anna ^ s °f the 20th Century as it would 

L.' A Mclntyre ' 1134 have if it had been properly advertised. 

Sherman A. Eastman! !!!!.']!.".]]]]] ]i,'i35 Tt was the bi g£ est show on earth thus far, 

Seth Keeler 1 136 hut the attendance was meager, as compared 

James Ashworth '!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! M37 with what it would have been if the show 

Thomas Aldrich 1,138 had been properly exploited. A lot of St. 

' ' Louis business men, among whom was a 

^, T „^„„„ „,_. „.„„■„„ , T „^ „« T liberal sprinkling of real estate boomers, 

CONGRESS TO SAVE THE WILD FOWL. got toget P her an | yoted themselves fat &L 

The Honorable George Shiras, Member aries for 2 or 3 years' work and then started 

of Congress from Pennsylvania/has evolved in to whoop up the Fair. They sent out 

a new and valuable idea in the matter of bulletins to the newspapers and magazines 

game protection, which he has embodied in and said please give us columns and pages 

a bill introduced in Congress and known as of free advertising week after week ari*d 

House Bill No. 15,601. month after month. We are doing a great 

It declares that all migratory game birds, work for the benefit of posterity and we 

such as wild geese, swans, brant, ducks, hope you will help us. But the editors 

woodcock, plover, snipe, shore birds, etc., winked the other eye and said to their office 

shall hereafter be considered as in the cus- boys, "These men are doing a great work 

tody of the Government of the United for themselves. They are asking the world 

States. The measure further provides that to cometo St. Louis and dump barrels of 

the Secretary of Agriculture shall formulate shekels into the coffers of these real estate 

rules and regulations prescribing close sea- boomers. Chuck this stuff into the waste 

sons on all such birds, methods to be used basket." 

in hunting and killing them, and regulating Then the business managers of these vafi- 

the sale and shipment thereof, out newspapers and magazines wrote thl 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



6? 



managers of the Fair, suggesting that it 
would be well for them to buy some adver- 
tising space. But the aforesaid managers 
could not see it. And so the great masses 
of the American people did not go to St. 
Louis. So it was with the Chicago Fair. 
So it was with the Omaha Fair. So it was 
with the Buffalo Fair. And so it will be 
with other Fairs in future, unless the manu- 
agers of future Fairs, who set to work to 
fill their own pockets, see fit to buy space 
in the newspapers and magazines, the legiti- 
mate channels for making the people ac- 
quainted with public matters. 



A NATIONAL REFUGE FOR BIRDS. 
President Roosevelt has performed an- 
other signal service for the cause of game 
preservation by creating a preserve and 
breeding ground for wild fowl. Here is a 
copy of the order which will always stand 
as a landmark in the history of the great 
movement for the preservation of wild- fowl. 

EXECUTIVE ORDER. 

It is hereby ordered that Breton Island, 
as shown by the General Land Office map 
of the State of Louisiana of date 1896, in 
Township 18 South, Range 20 East, St. 
Helena Meridian, when same shall be sur- 
veyed ; and Old Harbor and Freemason 
islands, in Townships 14 and 15 South, 
Ranges 21 and 22 East, same meridian, 
when surveyed, be, and they are hereby re- 
served and set apart for the use of the 
Department of Agriculture, as a preserve 
and breeding ground for native birds. 
This reservation to be known as "Breton 
Island Reservation." 

Theodore Roosevelt. 

White House, October 4, 1904. 

The credit of having suggested the cre- 
ation of this new park is due entirely to 
Mr. Frank M. Miller, of New Orleans, La., 
who is a member of the L. A. S. and 
President of the Louisiana Audubon So- 
ciety. Mr. Miller's letter is printed in the 
Natural History Department of this issue 
of Recreation, and his valuable service in 
this matter will be fully appreciated by 
every true sportsman and every nature 
lover in the United States and Canada. 



CLUB MEMBERS MUST PAY. 
One Henry J. Cummings, of St. Louis, 
Mo., joined the Grand Pass shooting club, 
which has a game preserve of 1,200 acres in 
Greene county, Illinois. In October, 1903, 
Mr. Cummings engaged in shooting ducks 
on the club's grounds without having first 
taken out a non-resident license. He 
claimed that as a member of the club the 
Illinois law requiring non-resident hunters 
to take out licenses did not apply to him 
A game warden arrested Mr, Cummings and 



a local justice fined him $25. Cummings 
carried the case to the Supreme Court of 
Illinois, where it was finally adjudicated in 
October last. 

The court held that the fact of Cum- 
mings holding a membership in the Grand 
Pass shooting club did not exempt him 
from the general law as to non-resident 
licenses, and sustained the action of the 
justice in assessing a fine against Cum- 
mings. 

The opinion is a lengthy one, evidently 
prepared with great care, and numerous de- 
cisions bearing on the status of the present 
case are cited. 

This is a splendid victory for the Illinois 
State Game Commission, and its effect will 
be far reaching. There are other cases 
pending in various States of the Union, 
where appeals have been made on exactly 
similar grounds, and this decision of the 
Illinois Supreme Court will prove of great 
value to the friends of game protection in 
enforcing their non-resident license laws. 



GROVER IS NOT GUILTY. 

A dispatch from Princeton, N. J., to the 
Associated Press states that ex-President 
Cleveland recently went out for a day's 
shooting, accompanied by 2 friends, and 
that they killed 16 quails and 7 rabbits. 
The Associated Press reporter at that place 
must have experienced a change of heart, 
or else he must be a new man in the busi- 
ness ; for this is the first report I have ever 
seen oi Mr. Cleveland's shooting that did 
not credit him with having killed at least 
100 birds in a day. 

I have written him several times asking 
for confirmation or denial of newspaper 
stories of his killing, and he has in each 
case replied to the effect that they were 
gross exaggerations! In one of these let- 
ters Mr. Cleveland added that he knew 
when to quit and that he heartily approved 
Recreation's course in condemning men 
who do not keep within reasonable limits, 



THE LONG NAME NUISANCE. 

I received a manuscript the other 
day from a woman who has 4 names and 
who spells them all out in full. In re- 
turning her story I volunteered this bit of 
advice, which many other writers would do 
well to consider : 

I beg to suggest, in your own interest, 
that it would be well to cut out some 01 
your names before sending this material 
to other editors. Nearly all such men are 
tired of long drawn out names, and are 
discouraging their use. I have heard of 
several good MSS. being returned because 
the editors objected to printing the names 
in full, and yet they did not care to dis- 
cuss the question with the writers, That 



68 



RECREATION. 



is not my reason for returning this MS., 
but I am sure you would sell it more readily 
if at least 2 of the names were omitted. 



The attention of readers in Western 
Pennsylvania is called to a communica- 
tion from Hon. W. E. Meehan, printed in 
the Fishing Department of this issue of 
Recreation, in which he asks for the names 
r.nd addresses of men in that part of Penn- 
sylvania who are willing to act as special 
fish protectors. I trust every one of my 
readers in that region will take up this mat- 
ter, will look for good men and give their 
names and addresses to Mr. Meehan. 

There are few public officers in the coun- 
try who are as zealous in their work as 
Commissioner Meehan, and the anglers of 
the State should support and cooperate with 
him in every way possible. 



A friend has called my attention to the 
fact that in the August issue of Recreation 
I made the mistake of recording 2 game 
hogs as number 1,041. These were Chas. 
E. Hewitt, Tumwater, Wash., and Wil- 
lard H. Ames, Malone, N. Y. Hewitt ad- 
mits having killed 147 ducks in one day 
with an automatic shot gun, while Ames 
says he saw a buck swimming in the lake, 
which was already well nigh exhausted, and 
that having no gun he rowed out, caught 
the deer by the horns and held its head 
under the water until it drowned. Ames, 
therefore, is the bigger hog of the 2, and 
I have changed his record in the book to 
number 1,041^2. 



An Associated Press dispatch from Mil- 
waukee states that 40 hunters were killed 
and wounded in Wisconsin and upper Mich- 
igan during the months of September. Octo- 
ber, November and December. This record 
indicates that there should be a shorter 
open season on hunters. If the^ laws of 
these 2 States are not amended in this re- 
spect the supply of hunters will soon be 
diminished to such an extent as to interfere 
materially with the trade of the gun and 
ammunition makers. 



In editing Allan Brooks' article printed 
on page 217 of October Recreation I mis- 
construed his meaning and inserted the 
words "Canadian goose" in lines number 13 
and 28 from bottom of right hand column, 
where I should have inserted the words 
"the brant." In both of these places Mr. 
Brooks used the pronoun "it" and in my 
effort to convey his meaning explicitly I 
guessed wrong. The statements in these 2 
paragraphs refer to the brant. 



A firm in Connecticut recently asked me 
for a rate on an advertisement of a ferret 
muzzle. I replied as follows : 

Dear Sirs : I do not approve of the use 
of ferrets in hunting. No one but a game 
hog of the most despicable type would 
ever use one. of these brutes for that pur- 
pose, and I would not carry an ad that 
would help a man out in the use of a fer- 
ret, at any price you could name. — Editor. 



If any reader <of Recreation knows Mr. 
F. W. Marshall, of Canandaigua, N. Y., or 
Mr. W. E. O'Neal, West Seneca, N. Y., 
will he please tell me how and where they 
can be reached by mail? There is impor- 
tant mail in this office awaiting both of 
these men. 



A subscription to Recreation means solid 
comfort a whole year. If you send one to a 
friend it will remind him 12 times during 
the year of your kindness and generosity. 
There are many men and women who for 
5 years past have annually sent in long lists 
of names of friends, accompanied with a 
check, in order that those friends might be 
made happy a whole year. Would it not be 
well for you to adopt this plan ? 

Try it and see how grateful the recipient 
will be. 



The admiral pinned the glittering order 
on the grizzled veteran's breast. 

"The Emperor honors a chosen son," he 
said, huskily. ' 

"I did nothing, excellency ; nothing," 
sobbed the old sailor, overcome by emo- 
tion, as he sank to one knee. 

"You saved the honor of your country," 
said the admiral, sternlv. ."In discovering 
the British fishing fleet" — he turned away 
to hide his tears— "you gave us the only vic- 
tory of the war." — Judge. 



I am with you on the advancement in the 
price of Recreation. I get more than $2 
worth of satisfaction out of the magazine 
each year. It is worth that amount to me to 
read your roasts of game and fish hogs each 
month. By all means advance the price to a 
paying basis. I, like many others, do not 
expect something for nothing. 

M. A. Woodman, Tama, la. 



The inventor of a new feeding bottle for 
infants sent out the following among his 
directions for using: 

"When the baby is done drinking it must 
be unscrewed and laid in a cool place under 
the hydrant. If the baby does not thrive 
on fresh milk it should be boiled." — Col- 
lier's. 



RECREATION. 








A Company Which is Actually Paying Out 
More Than its Obligations, The Best Guarantee 
of Liberal Treatment. 





70 



RECREATION. 



A COLORADO PARADISE. 

L. D. GILMORE. 

In October last, I first visited Sweet 
Water lake, Garfield county, in the Western 
part of Colorado, near one of the finest 
game and fish preserves in the State. 

Sweet Water lake lies about 15 miles 
due North of Dotsero, and is easily reached 
by a good wagon road. When half the 
distance to the lake has been covered, the 
altitude is nearly 2,000 feet above that of 
the village, and perhaps 8,000 feet above 
sea level. Directly ahead are the Flat Tops, 
whose summits, 9,000 to 10,000 feet above 
the st2i L are crowned with a dense growth 
of spruce timber, in which the snow lingers 
till midsummer. At their base, lies , the 
lake. At our backs mountains are piled 
on mountains, stretching away for miles, 
until the glistening, snow-capped peaks 
seem to pierce the sky, and vision is shut 
off. Far below, on the right, the Grand 
river winds, and in the distance are the 
rugged outlines of the Holy Cross. To the 
left, Deep creek, a typical mountain stream, 
abounding in trout, rushes along, bathing 
the feet of the Needles, 2 lofty spires on op- 
posite sides of the stream. Above the bed 
of the creek rises the turret of an imagin- 
ary castle which guards the entrance to 
the canyon, a wonderful example of nature's 
handiwork, 3,000 feet in depth. 

At the upper end of Sweet Water lake 
is the home of Mr. John Root. From all' 
appearances the lake is of volcanic origin.. 
It is a crescent, with the concave side', 
toward the North and the upper end to 
the West, is about a mile in extreme length 
and a quarter to a half mile in width. Near 
the upper end the waters are confined be- 
tween perpendicular walls of solid lime- 
stone, those on the North . side being 5 to 
20 feet in height, while those .on the op- 
posite side rise to the dignity of clifrs 500 
feet above the surface of the lake. The 
waters are clear as crystal, enabling one 
to see the bottom distinctly at a depth of 
12 to 15 feet, though viewed as a whole 
the lake is of a beautiful greenish blue 
color. By moonlight, the scene is one to 
thrill the most prosaic. The lake teems 
with salmon trout, and Sweet Water creek, 
either above or below the lake, offers the 
more exciting sport of stream fishing. 

Among points of interest about the lake 
the Sweet Water canyon, Lake creek and 
its beautiful cascades, and the cave with 
its Indian paintings, are worthy of men- 
tion. 

Grouse arc plentiful about the lake, and 
good shooting may be had in the neigh- 
boring hills. Added to Garfield, the neigh- 
boring counties of Rio Blanco and Routt 
give a region in which exists every species 
of game to be found in the State. Two 
miles West of Dotsero begins the remark- 
able canyon of the Grand river, rivalling 
in beauty the famous Royal Gorge, and 
extending nearly to Glenwood Springs, 17 
miles distant. 

Within a radius of 20 miles from Sweet 



Water lake as a center, and easy of access 
from, it are numerous other lakes varying 
in size and beauty. Among these are, Derby 
lake, about 10 miles from Sweet Water 
and at an elevation of nearly 9.000 feet; 
Deep lake, 11 miles distant and between 
9,gco and io.cco feet above sea level. In 
the vicinity of this lake are bear, elk, deer, 
and grouse. Upper and lower Marvine 
lakes are 18 miles distant and perhaps 8.000 
feet in altitude. Trapper's lake, which is 
much larger than Sweet Water, and one of 
the finest lakes in this part of the State, 
is also 18 miles distant ; elevation about 
9 coo feet. The fish in Trapper's are large 
as a rule, but are thin and not delicately 
flavored. The smaller ones are preferable 
for the Table. Hunting in this vicinity is 
good. Near Trapper's" is a small body of 
water called Big Fish lake, on account of 
the size of the fish taken from it. 

About 25 miles from Sweet Water, in 
Lost park, an excellent hunting ground, 
is Lost lake, at an elevation of 9,000 or 
10,000 feet. 



HOW THE COLONEL KILLED THE 
EAGLE. 

GEO. E. BLACKFORD. 

'Twas Colonel Arthur Smithby- Jones, 
For quails once hunting went, 

His Syracuse upon his arm, 

By Recreation sent. 
His pockets full of Robin Hood, 
Llis dog. keen on the scent. 

And as he ranged the meadows o'er, 

He saw a monstrous bird, 
Above in graceful circles soar; 
"An eagle ! on my word." 

No shot had he but No. 8, 

Which was of no avail ; 
So with his bold and fearless eye, 

He made the eagle quail. 

And then, as that was what he had come 
out for, Colonel Arthur Smithby-Jones pro- 
ceeded to shoot the quail. 



Two Irishmen had been captured by vigil- 
antes in the West and were about to be 
hanged for horse stealing. 

The lynchers took them to a bridge over 
a river; the rope was tied around the first 
man's neck and he was dropped overboard. 
When he struck the water the noose loos- 
ened and he swam away. 

As the second man was led forward and 
asked if he had any last request to make, 
he said : 

"For the love av heaven, tie that rope 
light. 1 can't swim, and I don't want to be 
drowuded." 



"There are some songs that will never 
die." said the musical enthusiast. 

"I guess that's right." answered Mr. Cum- 
rox. "My daughter sits down at the piano 
and tries to kill a few of 'em every morn- 
ing. But it's no use."— Washington Star. 



RECREATION. 



7i 



THE 



ilUTKl 




JANUARY 



HENRY B. HYDE 

FOUNDER 




19QM/ 



m&s 






J.W.ALEXANDER * 

PRESIDENT 




J.H.HYDE 



VICE PRESIDENT 



DONT 



let another year 
pass away without 
g'iving to your family the protection 
s^that life assurance alone can give. 

: By means of an Enifowmerit 
Policy in the Equitable yoii can not 
only give them this protection hut at 
the same time provide for your 
. 05m maturep years. 

Send coupon below, for particulars. 

Splendid opportunities for men -of character to act as representatives 
• ;'•■'.■■•'■■: Write to GAGE E.TARBELL 2nd Vice President 



The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, 120 Broadway, New York. Dept, No, 16, 

Please send me information regarding an Endowment Policy for $ if issued at years of age. 

Name _._ r 

Address 



72 



RECREATION. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

"For sport the lens is better than the gun." 
/ wish to make this department of the utmost 
use to amateurs. I shall, therefore, be glad to 
answer any questions and to print any items sent 
me by practical amateurs relating to their experi- 
ence in photography. 



TANK DEVELOPMENT. 

At last the amateur photographer is 
falling into line and following the lead of 
his professional brothers by the use of a 
tank and a weak developer to produce the 
best results on under exposed plates. _ This 
method of developing is a great saving of 
time and patience, and instead of using a 
number of sloppy trays, one can develop a 
dozen plates in the tank, which makes a 
pleasure of developing. 

Formula for a tank developer: 

Water 3^ ounces 

Carbonate of soda (dry) 2 ounces 

Sulphite of soda (dry) I to i J A ounces 

Bromide of ammonium 3° grains 

Citric acid 30 grains 

Hydroquinone l dram 

Olycin 2 drams 

Metol 2 drams 

Pyro 4 drams 

Dissolve the chemicals in the given rota- 
tion. _ 

To preserve the stock solution nut it into 
small bottles of the exact size to hold 
enough for making the dilute solution for 
the tank. The bottles should be tightly 
corked. 

For use, take 

Water 120 ounces 

Stock solution 6 ounces 

The developer should be used fresh, and 
its temperature kept between 60 and 65 de- 
grees Fahrenheit until development is com- 
pleted. The average time taken for the 
complete development of exposures of 
i -300th to i-700th part of a second, was i l/ 2 
to 2 hours. There are some extreme cases 
where workers of the tank method still fur- 
ther dilute their developer, and extend the 
time of development to 12 hours or 
more without in any way endangering the 
film. There is a delicate pink tinge to the 
shadows of the negatives after a prolonged 
development, but this is a help rather than 
a detriment to the printing qualities of a 
rapidly exposed negative. For beauty of 
grain there is nothing: to surpass a tank 
developed negative, and by using rubber 
finger cots on thumb and first finger, dis- 
agreeable stains and dangerous metol 
poisoning will be unknown. The late Mr. 
Ernest Marv the father of fast horse pho- 



tography in this country, used this formula 
for tank development: 

Water (boiling) 8 ounces 

Glycerin 1 ounce 

Meta bi-sulphite of potash.. 1 oz. " drams 
Caustic potash 1 oz. 3 drams 

For use : 

Developer 1 ounce 

Water 40 ounces 

Average time of development 15 minutes. 

— Exchange. 



FIXING PLATES IN LIGHT. 

To develop an exposed dry plate in trie 
dark room and fix it in light is not new, but 
is not generally practiced, because at first 
glance' it shows no particular advantage to 
those equipped with modern appliances. To 
develop a plate in the dark room, or such 
room or closet as one may be able to use 
for developing under difficulties, rinse in 2 
or 3 changes of water, dry and fix at leis- 
ure is of more recent origin and can be best 
appreciated by those afield, away from mod- 
ern conveniences, with a desire to know 
how their work is turning out. 

It is generally possible to secure suffi- 
cient water to develop a plate or 2, and to 
rinse it afterward, but few hotels or out 
of the way places frequented by the enthu- 
siastic amateur photographer afford run- 
ning water sufficient and convenient for 
eliminating the sodium hyposulphite used 
in fixing the negative, which unless entirely 
removed will cause the negative to de- 
preciate very soon. 

There are no hard formulae to remem- 
ber nor chemicals necessary which are diffi- 
cult to secure. Simply use your favorite 
developer and when development is com- 
pleted, rinse in 3 changes of water, not 
over a minute each, after which you may 
expose to all the light you please, dry the 
plates and fix them at leisure in the or- 
dinary manner. There is no more reason 
why a developed plate, washed free of the 
developer, should not be exposed to light, 
than there is why a finished negative should 
be exposed to rubv light only. The sodium 
hyposulphite will dissolve the silver salts 
not reduced by the developer as readily in 
the light as .in the dark, regardless of the 
degree of light to which the plate may have 
been exposed after development, having 
been properly washed before exposure. 

It is sometimes desirable in the case of 
under exposure, to develop to a degree of 
harshness, wash and expose to light, then 
with a weak developer again develop the 
plate until a thin veil is formed over the 
entire surface, after which the plate should 
be treated the same as any plate after a 
single development. This does not build 
up the image, but gives a better printing 
value to the shadows and prevents the print 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



73 



looking like a charcoal sketch. This 
method of treating- under exposure must 
be used with good judgment. There may 
be some failures, but after a little experi- 
ence this method will be found preferable 
in many cases to the usual methods of in- 
tensification. 

U. C. Wanner, West Philadelphia, Pa. 



TONING AND FIXING. 

Will you kindly give me some informa- 
tion about toning and fixing? I have no 
trouble with the toning solutions that I 
buy already prepared, but I wish to make 
my own. 

I enclose the formula I am trying to 
use ; also a print that I have toned out with 
it. I have followed this formula exactly 
and again with variations, but always with 
the same results. I want to get the dark 
color the same as gallery pictures or the 
ones in Recreation. Solio paper is the 
handiest to use, for we can get it at photo 
supply stores. If you will kindly tell me 
why I fail in this formula or give me a 
better one that will make the dark finish 

1 shall be under many obligations to you. 

J. B. Abbott, Columbia Falls/Mont. 

ANSWER. 

The Solio print you enclosed is well 
made. I doubt if you can improve on it by 
tonmg with gold alone. If you wish to get 
black and white prints instead of the brown 
it will be necessary to tone first with gold 
and then with platinum, or else use the 
platinum single toning solution. The latter 
is less trouble. Print deeper than for brown 
prints, wash the prints thoroughly through 
five or 6 changes of water, then tone in the 
following solution : 

Potassium chloro-platinite 15 grains 

Cupric acid. . 30 grains 

Citric acid 6 drachms 

Water 12 drachms 

For use take one drachm o„f this stock 
solution to 20 ounces of water. 

After toning wash through several 
changes of water to remove the acid, and 
then fix in hypo solution as given in the 
directions which accompany the Solio 
paper. 

If yon prefer to double tone, after ton- 
ing in the gold bath wash prints through 

2 or 3 changes of water and then tone in 
the following: 

Potassium chloro-platinite ... 15 grains 
Phosphoric acid (50 per cent.). 2 drachms 
Water 2 ounces 

For use take one drachm of stock solu- 
tion to 20 ounces of water. After toning 
wash and fix as before. Either of these 
methods should give you rich black and 
white prints. — Editor. 



WORK AT HOME. 
I have been a reader of Recreation 2 
years, and am much interested in the pho- 
tographic department, having used a cam- 
era 4 years, with varying results. I 
am always interested in any article on 
Velox paper. My printing and developing 
arrangements are different from any I have 
seen. I have a wooden box 18 x 30 inches 
and 10 inches deep, standing on end, with 
a hole about 4x6 inches in the bottom, 
or what would be the bottom if it was right 
side up, with red paper pasted over it. My 
developing tray stands in front of red cov- 
ered hole, with water tray at leit, and hypo 
tray in front of water tray; while my lamp 
is inside the box, allowing 2 or 3 printing 
frames to be used on the light side, while 
the red paper gives a good light to work 
by in any room where paper or woodwork 
is not too light. By placing printing frame 
18 inches from light a thin negative may 
be printed from without danger of fogging, 
as is often the case when placed closer. I 
print longer than is usually recommended, 
and use a greater quantity of bromide — 
over 10 times as much as formula calls for. 
The bromide shows up . development and 
brings out details which would be lost by 
the usual treatment. I have used as high 
as 20 grains of bromide crystals in 6 ounces 
of developer and have obtained satisfactory 
results. I never yet got a good clear print 
by using the 5 and 10 drops of 10 per cent, 
solution as per Velox formula. I think 
the reason so many dirty, muddy prints are 
obtained by tyros is that they use too little 
bromide. If beginners who are making 
such prints will try this excess plan they 
will see a great improvement in results, 
and will think Velox is the best paper, after 
all. If results should not improve I am 
willing to take all sorts of abuse, by mail, 
and keep good natured. 

Do your own developing and see what 
solid enjoyment you will gain. You may 
spoil a plate now and then, or twice as 
often, but you soon will become expert and 
independent. 

F. M. Mahan, Rochester, N. Y. 



AN ACID-PROOF TABLE TOP. 
A black finish for table tops may be made 
as follows : 

1. 

Iron sulphate 4 parts 

Copper sulphate 4 parts 

Potassium permanganate 8 parts 

Water, q. s 100 parts 

2. 

Aniline 12 parts 

Hydrochloric acid 18 parts 

Water, q. s 100 parts 

or 

Aniline hydrochlorate 15 parts 

Water, q. s 100 prrts 

Apply with a brush 2 coats of solution 



74 



RECREATION. 



No. i s while hot, the second coat as soon 
as the first is dry; then 2 coats of solution 
No. 2, and allow the wood to dry thor- 
oughly. Later apply a coat of raw linseed 
oil, using a cloth instead of a brush, in 
order to get a thinner coat of oil. 

Wood that has been varnished should 
be scraped before the solution is applied. 

The black color does not appear at once, 
but usually requires a few hours before 
becoming ebony black. The linseed oil may 
be diluted with turpentine without disad- 
vantage, and after a few applications the 
suriace will take on a dull and not dis- 
pleasing polish. The table tops are easily 
cleaned by washing with water or suds and 
the application of another coat of oil puts 
them in excellent order. Strong acids or 
alkalies when spilled, if soon wiped off, 
have scarcely a perceptible effect. 

A slate or tile top is expensive not only 
in its original cost, but also as a destroyer 
of glassware. Wood tops when painted, 
oiled or paraffined have objectionable fea- 
tures, the latter especially in warm weather. 
Old table tops after the paint or oil is 
scraped off down to the wood take the 
above finish nearly as well as new wood. — 
Journal of Applied Microscopy. 



SNAP SHOTS. 

Will the single platinum toning solutions 
now on the market, such as Martin's Platyn, 
really do what is Claimed for them, to pro- 
duce fine platinum tones on all gelatine 
papers, and will prints toned in these solu- 
tions be permanent? 

Various methods for mounting glossy 
photos have been given in Recreation in 
answer to Arthur Roth's inquiry. I have 
tried several methods, but have found this 
by far the most satisfactory : 

When the prints are squeegeed on the 
ferrotype plate and all the moisture has 
been taken out with a dry blotter, apply a 
thin coating of good paste to back of prints 
and allow it to dry. To mount, wet the 
card with a soft, wet brush, place the dry 
print in position on card, cover with blotter 
and roll thoroughly. If the card is not wet 
too much the photos will be just as glossy 
as before mounting. 

H. O. Bjornaas, Underwood, Minn. 



I have a Premo folding film camera, size 
4x5, and wish to develop the pictures I 
take with it Will you kindly tell me how 
to use the following in developing and 
printing: A box of hyposulphite of soda, 
a bottle of Two in One, a developer and a 
hypo fixing and toning bath? 

Margaret Harris, New York City. 

ANSWER. 

It is much more difficult to tell anyone 
how to develop a print than it is to show 



him. If there are no directions with youf 
preparations you would better go to the 
man of whom you bought them and have 
him explain their use to vou. A much more 
satisfactory way to learn is to get some 
friend who does photographic work to teach 
you. There are a number of books pub- 
lished which will give you the theory, but 
seeing someone develop and print is the 
quickest way to learn. — Editor. 



Please give me in Recreation a formula 
for a single platinum toner for all gelatine 
printing out papers. 

Phil Montz, Cameron, Mo. 

Nearly all the formulae for platinum sin- 
gle toning solutions will work well on gela- 
tine P. O. P. A good one is as follows: 

Potassium chloro-platinite 15 grains 

Cupric chloride 30 grains 

Citric acid 6 drachms 

Water 12 drachms 

Dissolve the chloro-platinite and cupric 
chloride,- then add the citric acid, and when 
the latter has dissolved, filter. 

For use take 1 drachm of this solution 
to 20 ounces of water. — Editor. 



The best developer I have yet found for 
under exposed plates is as follows : 

Water, 10 ounces ; sulphite of soda crys- 
tals, 180 grains ; carbonate of soda crys- 
tals, 150 grains; metol, 30 grains; hydro- 
chinon, 4 grains. 

To use, take an equal quantity of this 
solution and water. 

I have taken snap shots late in the even- 
ing and got good moonlight effects with 
this developer. If any one has a better 
developer for under exposed plates I 
should be pleased to learn it. 

Can any one please tell -me of a mucilage 
that will take the place of the mucilage 
used on stamps? 

C. E. Brobst, Canfield, Ohio. 



Do not 'fail to read the announcement of 
Recreation's Drawing Contest on page 
xxvii. 



Are you making up a list of maga- 
zines for 1903? Do not fail to in- 
clude Recreation. Nothing else will give 
you so much pleasure for $1. If you care 
for hunting, fishing, photography or nature, 
you can get more joy out of Recreation 
than from any other source except an actual 
day afield. Send in your subscription and 
those of your friends. 



"I'd be willing to work 15 hours a day lor 
you, darling," he ardently pleaded. "Scab ! 
she hissed, as she swept from the room ; 
for her papa was a walking delegate. — 
Town and Country. 



RECREATION, 



xvn 




Here is Camera Convenience 



The 




Folding 

Film 

Premo 



Loads by daylight in three seconds with 
the 1 2-exposure Film Pack. A single 
motion presents each film for exposure. 

Made in three sizes. 

A handsome Holiday present 



Premo Folding 3#x4X 


3%*SH 


4-x 5 


Film Camera No. 1 $10.00 


$12.50 


$12.50 


Premo Film Pack, 12 exposures .70 


.80 


.90 



Premo Plate Cameras become film cameras by use of the 

Premo Film Pack Adapter. Price, 3%x4%, $1.00; .4x5, 

$1.50; 5x7, $2.50. 



ROCheSter Optical CO., Rochester, New York 

Catalogue at Dealer's or by Mail. 



xviii RECREATION. 



A Gun Cabinet 

would make a splendid Holiday Present 

For a Sportsman 

It is just the thing in which to keep his 

Guns, Ammunition, Fishing Tackle 

and other Jewelry in perfect order and properly protected from dust 

and moisture 

v 

SEND ME 

35 Yearly Subscriptions 



to 



RECREATION 



and I will send you a gun and 
fishing tackle cabinet made by the 
West End Furniture Co., Williamsport, 
Pa., listed at $33. 



Sample Copies for use in canvassi?tg 
furnished on request 



ADDRESS 



RECREATION 

23 West 24th St., New York City 



RECREATION. 



xix 



RAIN IN THE MOUNTAINS. 

WINFRED CHANDLER. 

Rain, rain, rain, 

Till the trees droop, wet with tears. 
Rain, rain, rain, 

Till my heart is filled with fears. 
Think of the trout in the stream, 

And think of the deer in the wood. 
Think of the fun I would have to-day 

If only the weather were good. 
Think of the scurrying pheasant, 

And think of the mountain ram, 
Think of my rod and gun, 

Then think of the rain, — Oh Dam! 



The rector was taking in the St. Louis 
Exposition. In one of the buildings he met 
a voluble Irishman who had charge of an 
exhibit of Irish relics. The dominie's at- 
tention was especially called to the stump 
of a tree in which were imbedded the points 
of a set of deer antlers. "How do you sup- 
pose the deer got his horns so firmly fas- 
tened?" he asked. 

"Surely I don't know, your riverence," 
was the reply, "but I think he must have 
been buttin' in." 



Smith : I've just consulted an oculist 
about my eyes, and he has ordered me to 
stay in a dark room 2 weeks. 

Kodak Fiend : The very thing, old man. 
I've got 150 films I'd like you to develop 
for me. — The Tattler. 



Most of the opportunities 
for making mistakes are 
removed by the 

KODAK 
SYSTEM 

KODAKS, $5.00 to $97.00. 
HELPS FOR THE KODAKER. 



Book of the 
£1,000 Kodak 
Exhibition 
containing 70 
prize pictures, 
by mail or at 
the dealers, 
25 cents. 



" Home Portraiture," 
by F. M. Steadman, $ .25 

" Amateur Portrait- 
ure by Flashlight," 
byW. S. Ritch, - .10 

Kodak Catalogues, Free. 
All Dealers. 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. 
Rochester, N. Y. 




XX 



RECREATION. 



DO YOU WANT 



A Good, Reliable, Substantial, Well-Made 



REVOLV 





? 



If so, send me 



5 Yearly Subscriptions 



I will send you such a Revolver as a premium 




It is made by the HARRINGTON AND RICHARDSON ARMS CO., 
and this means good-material and good workmanship. 



Any other article made by that firm can be had en a basis of one yearly sub 
sci iption to each dollar of the list price. 



SAMPLE COPIES FOR USE IN CANVASSING 
FURNISHED ON A P PLICA TION 



Address RECREATION 
23 West 24th Street, New York City 



RECREATION. 



xxi 




With the New 
Year come the 
new improve- 
ments 

embodied in the 



Folding Hawk-Eye 



No. 3, Model 3. 



It has an aluminum frame of unusual lightness and pneumatic release 
shutter with iris diaphragm stops. For film pictures 3% x 4^ inches ; or it 
may be fitted with plate attachment. 

THE PRICE. 
No. 3 Folding Hawk-Eye, Model 3, with rapid rectilinear lens 

and pneumatic release shutter, ..... $15.00 

No. 3 Folding Hawk-Eye, Model 3, single lens and pneumatic 

release shutter, - - - - - - - 13.50 

BLAIR CAMERA CO. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



F-6. 8. 



TURNER-REICH ANASTIGMATS are 25^ 
faster than formerly and all their good qualities have 
been preserved. Order one of these superb lenses 
on trial and you will never part with it. 

Sold direct from the factory at a liberal discount. 



ITSALL 

m THB, 

V LENS 7 






GUNDLACH-MANHATTAN OPTICAL CO 

730 Clinton Avenue So., ROCHESTER., N. Y. 

Mention Recreation 



xxii RECREATION. 



STILL ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 

Send me 30 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION and I will send you a 

No. 1 Double Barrel 
Breech Loading Hammerless Gun 

V 

Hade by the Ithaca Gun Co. 
and Listed at $40 

I have contracted for 20 of these 
guns at a price which enables me to 
offer them as above, and they will 
doubtless all be taken within the next 
3 months. 

If You Want One Get Busy at Once 

Sample copies of RECREATION for 
use in canvassing furnished on application 



RECREATION, 23 West 24th St.. New York 



RECREATION. 



XX1U 



Holiday Presents 

Oil Portraits on Approval 

If you will send me a photo of yourself or a 
friend and state color of hair, eyes and com- 
plexion, I will paint and send you on approval 
an oil or pastel portrait, miniature or life size. 

Canvas, 6x8 or 8xio inches, $10 

Canvas, 10x12 or 12x14 inches, $15 

Full life size, - - $35 

Z. EMMONS, 58 W. !Q4tK St 

Reference: Mr. G. O. Shields. New York 



Will you not kindly recommend 
Recreation to all such of your 
friends as are sportsmen? Send me 
their names and addresses and I will 
mail them sample copies. I need the 
hearty co-operation and support of all 
true sportsmen and nature lovers in 
extending the circulation of this mag- 
azine. It is doing a great work in 
preserving the game, the game fishes, 
the song birds and the forests of this 
country, and the more people it 
reaches the greater good it can do. 
Please do not forget to send me the 
list of names. 

G. O. Shields, Edr. and Mgr., 
23 West 24th St., N. Y. 



"At this height," said the guide as they 
paused on the mountain side to look at the 
valley far below, "people with weak hearts 
often die." 

"How often," asked a deeply interested 
listener, "do they have to die before they 
stay dead? — Chicago Tribune. 



I have received the Marble pocket axe 
from the company in Michigan and have 
given it a good trial. It is the real thing. 
Many thanks for so valuable a premium. 
I will get. more subscribers as soon as 
possible. 

John Phillips, Hamilton, Ont. 



I am in receipt of the No. 4 Bristol steel 
rod sent me as premium for subscriptions 
to Recreation. The rod is a peach. Please 
accept my profound thanks for it. 

C. A. Waldron, E. Bloomfield, N. Y. 



I received the King boat you sent me as 
a premium and am much pleased with it. 
I shall send more subscriptions soon. 

Chas. P. Craig, Uniontown, Pa. 



99 % of a camera's value 
is in the lens. 

THE GRAND 



PRIZE 



at the world's fair 
has been award- 
ed to the 

GOERZ 
LENS 






in competition with the world. 
Goerz lenses are essential 
in the making of perfect 
pictures. The manufacturers 
lave always claimed to make 
the best lenses in the world 
— competition has proved it. 
Catalogue Free. 

MAIN OFFICE: 
Berlin-Friedenaw, Germany. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

4 and 5 Holborn Circus, London, Encj. 

22 Rue De V Entrepot, Paris. 

C. P. GOERZ, 

Room 27, 52 E. Union Square, New York. 



XXIV 



RECREATION. 



KUROPATKIN'S PAY. 

The salary of General Kuropatkin, it is said, 
amounts to about $100,000 a year. 

When General Kuropatkin draws his week- 
ly envelope, 
A matter of 2 thousand, as I figure out 

the dope, 
He must indeed feel sheepish ; in fact, if 

he's sincere, 
He probably looks everywhere except at 

the cashier. 
You know the way it is yourself when 

things are going wrong, 
You hate to take your wages, though the 

figure be a song. 
Sometimes, I know, I feel inclined my 

salary to miss 
When I have filled my columns with things 

about like this. 

When General Kuropatkin draws his week- 
ly envelope, 

Just after being driven from another easy 
slope, 

And sees the yellow bank notes that glisten 
in the sun, 

And fondles them endearingly, and counts 
them on the run, 

I'll wager that he blushes, if Muscovites 
can blush, 

And make another effort to stop the Japs' 
mad rush. 

I'll wager that he mutters, "It would not 
seem so strangesky 

To find in next week's envelope some ko- 
pecks and small changesky." 

Ah, well ! This world we live in is a very 
curious blend, 

And there are many, many things we can 
not comprehend. 

Think of the countless thousands never 
driven to the woods 

Who make about 12 bones a week deliver- 
ing the goods ! 

Think of the men with pompous fronts and 
nothing else at all 

Who make the coin so fast they couldn't 
store it in a hall ! 

No wonder that from day to day the Czar 
is losing hope, 

When General Kuropatkin draws his week- 
ly envelope. 

—Milwaukee Sentinel. 



Miss Plane : He thinks me pretty, doesn't 
he? 

Miss Chellus : I'm sure I don't know. 

Miss Plane : Why, May told me she 
heard him telling you I was "just as pretty 
as I could be." 

Miss Chellus: Well ? — Philadelphia 
Press. 



Wabash — Is her position in society se- 
cure? 

Lakesi'W- [ should say so. Why, that 
womn-- H-:^s a divorce lawyer by the year 

*— JiAch^ige. 



MY GUIDE'S FABLE. 

I swung to the ripplin' shallers an' brung 

the canoe a-land, 
An' there wuz a fine red squirrel a-cussin' 

to beat the band ; 
A-snappin' his teeth an' barkin', a-jerkin' 

his bushy tail — 
The things what he said wuz shockin', up 

there on the Injun trail. 

Sez he, "Look a-here, young feller ; these 

woods is a den o' thieves ! 
I'd gethered a pile o' hazels an' hid 'em 

among the leaves ; 
When up comes that highway robber — that 

scallywag, bluecoat jay— 
The son o' the thief that hatched 'im, an' 

filches the lot away ! 
I won't eat a speck o' dinner ! I swear it 

upon my soul ! 
Until I kin make that sinner surrender 

them nuts he stole !" 

"The forest is thick with hazels!" sez I, 

"an' the medder corn 
Is meller with juicy kernels ez white ez 

them teeth o' yo'rn. 
The shell o' the shagbark's open ; the 

ches'nut hez bu'st the burr ; 
The cones in a thousan' tassels is ripe on 

the glossy fir. 
A pert little chap, ez yo' be, with on'y the 

meanest luck, 
C'uld find, in a whisk an' scamper, ten 

times what the jaybird tuk. 
Besides, in" the chipmunk's pantry they say 

there's an empty shelf. 
An', beggin yo'r pardin, ain't yo' a bit of a 

thief yo'rself?" 

Pie jaws me a piece like fury; then squeaks 

like the Squire in hall 
A-scoldin' a stupid jury: "Yo' don't git 

the pi'nt at all ! 
I'd guv 'em, an' guv my blessin' ! but," 

givin his tail a fling, 
"Aw, shucks fer the nuts ! I'm pressin' 

the principle 0' the thing!" 

"Ef you'd been a King," I hollers, "I 
reck'n that you'd a spent 

A couple of million dollars collectin' a cop- 
per cent !" 
Arthur Guiterman, in N. Y. Times. 



"Who is that chap talking so much over 
there?" 

"Oh, he's a big gun ; full, too." 

"Why, he doesn't walk as if he had been 
drinking." 

"No, but like other big guns he is more 
dangerous when you don't know he is 
loaded." — Baltimore Herald. 



A Mormon boy out in Utah, 

One day chanced to meet his own pa; 

Cried the glad little one: 

"Shake, pa; I'm your son!" 
"Indeed?" said the man; "who's your ma?" 
—Chicago Rccord-Heraldi , 



RECREATION. 



xv 




Don't Want to Hear 



h I\8tl i^JL ©CllCQcI dC16nC6 d&yS imDOUl %-fOT.kGG 



Many intelligent people don't care to listen to the truth about coffee causing their aches 
ails and disturbances. 

They keep on using the drug coffee and suffer from heart derangement, liver or kidney 
disorders or some kind of stomach and nervous troubles. They "don't believe coffee is to blame," 
and don t want to listen to medical science. 

They should keep on with the coffee until Nature forces her facts home in the form of sick- 
ness or organic disease if they want absolute proof. Suppose on the other hand one should quit 
coffee in time and get welr\ It is easy if you shift to properly made Postum. In a few days you 
will feel a great change for the better. 

Coffee sets up disease. POSTUM dissipates it and sets up health again. Medical science 
has found this out by experience, the Great Teacher. A prominent physician of Des Moines, 
Iowa, tells how he learned it : 

"I am a physician of 18 years' practice. I felt the need of a stimulant, and for the first 
five or six years of my practice drank strong coffee. Eight or ten years ago I began to notice 
symptoms of heart disease. This seemed to be a regular organic type, and year by year became 
aggravated by dizziness, faintness and later, inability to walk at times. Finally I became such a 
confirmed invalid that I had to give up practice. 

"Several years elapsed with the symptoms growing worse. I was considered marked for 
an early grave. I honestly believed that coffee was the trouble, and it finally became impressed 
upon me to give it up. This I found easier to do when POSTUM FOOD COFFEE was used in 
its place. I made the change more to satisfy my friends than with any hope of benefit from such 
a simple change, especially in such an incurable case as mine. I was debilitated and very weak, 
and about 30 pounds short of my old weight. 

"From the first wesk I noticed a marked change and within three months I was almost 
fully restored to my old strength and health, with the heart trouble and dizziness all gone. 

"These facts are known to hundreds of my friends and acquaintances throughout this city." 
Name and address given by Postum Co., Battle Creek, Mich. 
There's a. reason. 



XXVI 



RECREATION. 



WINTER IS HERE 

GET A PAIR OF SKATES 

For yourself, your best girl or your brother, or for some other 
girl's brother, or for anyone you love, and who is fond of skating 



LADIES' LOCK LEVER 




For 5 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

I WILL SEND YOU 

A Pair of Lock Lever Skates 



OR 



A Pair of Ladies' Lock Lever Skates 

Grade 3, made by Barney & Berry, Springfield, Mass. 

LOCK LEVER 




As every skater knows, these are the best skates in the world. 
The Holiday season is here, and you could scarcely select a more 
appropriate present. 

FOR A MAN, OR A WOMAN, A BOY OR A GIRL 

than a pair of these high-grade skates. Only a limited stock on hand, and 
when these are gone this offer will be withdrawn. 

Sample copies of RECREATION for use in canvassing; furnished 
on application* 

Address 23 West 24th St, New York 



RECREATION. 



XXVll 



PRIZES FOR GOOD DRAWINGS. 

With a view to stimulating among 
boys and girls the study of wild 
animals and birds and the develop- 
ment of artistic taste, Recreation now 
offers a scries of prizes as follows : 

For the best sketch of a live wild 
animal in action, $10. 

For the best sketch of a live wild 
bird in flight or other action, $8. 

For the best sketch of a live domes- 
tic animal in action, $6. 

For the best sketch of a live domes- 
tic fowl in flight, or other action, $5. 

Studies may be made in black and 
white wash, pen and ink, or pencil, 
my preference being in the order stat- 
ed. They must be from life and not 
from other pictures. 

The sketches may be made on any 
kind of paper or drawing board and 
of any size desired, though I prefer 
to have them on paper at least twice 
as large as a Recreation page. 

All sketches which may be pub- 
lished, and for which prizes may not 
have been awarded, will be paid for 
at the rate of $1 each. 

Contestants must write on back of 
picture full name, address, and age. 

This competition is limited to per- 
sons under 20 years of age, and a let- 
ter from one of the parents or from 
the legal guardian of each contestant 
must accompany each drawing, certi- 
fying that the age of the contestant is 
as stated thereon. 

Drawings should be packed flat and 
with a sufficient quantity of straw 
board to keep them from being dam- 
aged in the mails ; and on account of 
the required writing on the backs of 
the drawings it will be necessary to 
prepay them at letter postage rates. 

Competition will close February 28, 
1905. 

Address drawings and correspond- 
ence relating thereto, Art Editor, 
Recreation, 23 West 24th Street, 
New York City. 

DUG UP. 

''Remember, always," exhorted the 
preacher , "that whatever you sow, that 
also you shall reap." 

"Not always," replied Subbnbs ; "not if 
your neighbor keeps chickens." — Philadel- 
phia Ledger. 



YOU DON! NEED A GUN 
FYOU KNOW 







If you would know how 
to defend yourself, unarm- 
ed, against every form of 
vicious attack and render 
helpless your assailant with 
an ease and rapidity which 
is astonishing — if you 
would possess that physi- 
cal strength and power of 
endurance which character- 
izes the Japanese soldier — - 
you must learn Jiu-jitsu. 

Jiu-jitsu is the most wonderful system of physi- 
cal training and self-defense the world has ever 
known. Its practice develops every muscle, every 
tissue and strengthens every organ of the human 
body. It makes men "strong as steel," and" 
women the physical equal of men of their own age 
and weight. As a means of self-defense, it is as 
potent at short range as the most deadly weapon. 
The Science of Jiu-jitsu includes a thorough 
knowledge of anatomy, and teaches how to pro- 
duce temporary paralysis bv a slight pressure ex- 
erted at one of the many vulnerable points. When 
once a person skilled in the art effects one of the 
Jiu-jitsu "holds," it is utterly useless for an oppo- 
nent -to offer resistance. It makes no difference 
how unequally matched in point of size or strength 
the contestants may be, a knowledge of Jiu-jitsu 
will enable a woman to overcome and render power- 
less the strongest man. 

JIU = JITSU SUCCESSFULLY TAUGHT 
BY MAIL 

For over 2,000 years the principles of Jiu-jitsu 
have been religiously guarded. By an Imperial 
edict the teaching of the system was forbidden 
outside of Japan. The friendly feeling, however, 
existing between Japan and the United States has 
been instrumental in releasing Jiu-jitsu from its 
oath-bound secrecy, and all the secrets of the Jap- 
anese National System of Physical Training and 
Self-Defense are now being revealed to the Amer- 
ican people for the first time by the YABE 
SCHOOL OF JIU-JITSU, at Rochester, N. Y. 
Mr. Y. K. Yabe, formerly of the Ten-Shin Ryu 
School of Japan v has formulated a correspondence 
course, which contains full instructions in Jiu- 
jitsu. It is identical with the course taught in 
the leading school of Japan. 

FIRST LESSON SENT FREE 

An intensely interesting book which explains the 
, principles of Jiu-jitsu has just been written by Mr 
Yabe. As long as the edition lasts, this book, to- 
gether with the first lesson in the art, will be sent 
free to interested persons. The lesson is fully illtis- 
trated with full-page half-tone engravings, and 
1 shows one of the most effective methods known 
to Jiu-jitsu for disposing of a dangerous antagon- 
ist. If you desire to know more about the closely 
guarded secrets of this marvelous science, you 
should write to-day for this free book and speci- 
men lesson. They will be sent you by return mail, 
postpaid. Address, 

THE YABE SCHOOL OF JIU-JITSU 

i] 104 R, Realty Bldg., Rochester, N. Y. 



u 1 



ffi -•-vfl&- -v-4C ■•'••% £ 



sdt 



xxviii RECREATION. 



The Acme of Sport 
in Rifle Shooting 

can only be attained by the use of a telescope 
With a high power instrument of this kind attached to 
your rifle you can do much better work at any distance 
than with ordinary sights. Furthermore, you can 
see your bullet hole in the target, after each shot up 
to 200 yards and thus know just what you are doing. 

Send me IO yearly subscriptions to 

RECREATION 

and I will send you a Rough Rider Telescope to fit your 
rifle. Or you can ship your rifle to the factory and have 
the tube attached. Any other telescope made by the 
Malcolm Rifle Telescope Co., Syracuse, N. Y., will be 
furnished on the basis of one yearly subscription to each 
dollar of the list price. 



Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. 



ADDRESS 



RECREATION 



23 Wesl 24lh Si. New York 



RECREATION. 



XXIX 



Your face has a 
right to health and 
comfort. Insist on 
Williams' Shaving 
Soap. 

Williams' Shaving Sticks and Tablets sold everywhere. 
The J. B. Williams Co., Glastonbury, Conn. 



A young man who was working for the 
railroad company went to one of the direc- 
tors and asked for a pass to some distant 
point. 

"You have been working for us some 
time?" inquired the official. 

"Yes, sir," the young fellow answered. 

"Have you ever had any complaint to 
make?" 

"No, sir," answered the employee. 

"Well, if you were working for a farmer, 
would you have the nerve to ask him to 
harness his horses and take you to a cer- 
tain part of the country?" the director 
asked. 

"No, sir. • But if he had his horses all 
ready and was going to that point, I should 
call him a mean farmer if he refused to 
take me," was the young fellow's reply. — 
Philadelphia Ledger. 



A prudish young miss of Oshkosh 
Slipped up on an overripe squash ; 
Good breeding is great, 
But I grieve to relate 
She forgot all her French in her much 
confused state. 
And the comment she made was "Oh, 
Gosh !" 



Hold that iron arm of yours on the wheel 
for the pump gun and the game hogs. By 
so doing you will earn my everlasting 
thanks and respect. 

Wm. H. Fischer, New York City. 



After 
Exposure 

to freezing weather, 
rub chapped hands 
and face, chilblains 
and frost-bitten fing- 
ers and toes with 
Pond's Extract. 

Takes out the smart 
and brings speedy re- 
lief. Just one example 
of a hundred virtues of 





"The Old Family Doctor'' 

When fatigued, refreshes like sleep. 

Sold only in sealed bottles under buff wrapper. 

Accept No Substitnte, 




FALLING HAIR 

BALDNESSS 



There is butone way to tell the reason of baldness and falling hair, 
and that is by a microscopic examination of the hair itself. The 
particular disease with which your scalp is afflicted must be known 
before it can be intelligently treated. The use of dandruff cures 
and hair tonics,without knowing the specific cause of your disease, 
is like taking medicine without knowing what you are trying to 
cure. Send a few fallen hairs from your combings, to Prof .J. H, 
Austin, the celebrated Bacteriologist, who will send you absolutely 
free a diagnosis of your case, a booklet on care of the hair and scaip, 
and a sample box of the remedy which he will prepare speciall/ for 
you. Enclose 2c postage and write to-day. 
PROF. J. H. AUSTIN, tf«6 McVicker's Bldg., Chicago, 111.. 

The manufacturer of obesity remedies 
lives on the fat of the land. — Philadelphia 
Record. 




Our Aim is to Give You 
More Than 
You Expect, 




Our blades are razor steel; 
hand forged; file tested and 
warranted. This is the dif- 
ference between them and other 
knives. We deal direct with 
consumers since 1877. This cut 
is "Chauneey Depew's Pet," has 3 blades (one is a file). Handle 
is choicest selected pearl; German silver back and ends. Price 
in chamois case, $1.50, postpaid. Same 
knife,' 2 blade, $1; plainer finish. 3 blade, 
same quality, $1; smaller, 2 blade, for 
lady, $1; plainer finish, 75c; 
boy's 2 blade with chain, 
50c; girl's 2 blade, 60c. 
Razor steel jnrl. -knife, 2 
blades, 7Iic, but 48c for a 
while; 5 for $2. This knife 
and 60c. Shears for $1.00. 
Illustrated 80-page list free, 
and "How to use a Razor." 

9IAIIKR & GROS1I CO. 
74 A Street Toledo, Ohio 



XXX 



RECREATION. 



Beautiful Hair for All 



No Longer Any Excuse for Dandruff 

Falling' Hair, Gray Hair 

or Baldness, 



A TRIAL PACKAGE MAILED FREE 




A grand discovery has been made that quickly re- 
moves dandruff, makes the hair grow long and beautiful 
even on heads that have been bald for years, and at the 
same time restores it to its natural color. The proprie- 
tors will mail to anyone who sends name and address, a 
free trial package of the remedy so that all may test it 
for themselves. As it is a pure vegetable product you 
need have no hesitancy in using it freely, as it cannot- 
harm the most tender scalp. Write to-day to Altenheim 
Medical Dispensary, 3179 Foso Bldg., Cincinnati, Ohio, 
enclosing a 2-cent stamp to cover postage, and they will 
forward a free trial package at once. 



"This is a queer looking spoon hook," 
said the customer. 

"That, sir," said the dealer in sporting 
goods, "is the very latest. It is called the 
'Anglers' Delight.'" 

"What's the idea?""; 

"It is a combination spoon hook and 
corkscrew." — Catholic Standard and 
Times. 



Little Fred : Papa, didn't I hear you say 
to the minister at dinner that you didn't 
believe in future punishment? 

Papa : Yes, my son. 

Little Fred : Then I s'pose that lets me 
out of the lickin' you promised me after 
supper, doesn't it? — Chicago Daily News. 



The Buffalo Is Well Nigh Extinct 

And every nature lover wants a relic; 
of him. Here is a chance to get it. 
I have in stock a limited number of 
buffalo horns, highly polished and 
fitted with nickel plated flanges at 
the base, so that they can be 
screwed on the wall, thus forming 

A Novel and 
Effective Gun Rack 

So long as the supply lasts I will 
give a pair of these horns for 

3 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. Address 



Recreation, 



23 West 24th Street 
NEW YORK 



Constituent — Senator, I am thinking of 
settling in Negosha county. Do you sup- 
pose an industrious man could do well 
there? 

Senator Lotsmun — He ought to. I know 
there's a good deal more money in circu- 
lation in that county than there was be- 
fore I began my last campaign. — Chicago 
Tribune. 



"Mrs. Guschley remarked to me that it 
must be pleasant to be married to a clever 
man," said Proudley's wife. 

"What did you say?" 

"I told her, of course, that I didn't know; 
I had only been married once." — Catholic 
Standard and Times. 



No use trying to 

get your muscles up to this pitc' 1 with dumb- 
bells, chest- weights, etc. Muscle alone won't 
do it. LET ME TELL YOU of an easy way 
to enlarge your arms ONE INCH or more, 
breathe naturally and increase your strength 
50 PER CENT in ONE MONTH. Develop 
your chest, shoulders and legs to a wonderful 
extent, strengthen your HEART, LUNGS, 
NERVES, and all the INTERNAL muscles. 
Rid yourself of catarrh, rheumatism, writer's 
madcr , dyspepsia and constipation, and attain robust health, great strength, youthful vigor 

and a clear complexion. f>r. R. L. Smith, of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, of Brooklyn, N. Y. writes.-— 

" Your Systeni and the Hercules Club increased the size of my arms an inch, aitd my strength fully bo per cent in ih irty days. 

WRITE NOW! Address, « HERCULES," Box 3559 K, Boston, Mass. 




RECREATION. 



XXXI 





REGISTERED 

WATERPROOF 




COURT 
PLASTER 



Heals Cuts, Abrasions, Hang-Nails, 

Chapped and Split Lips or Fingers, 

ISnrns, Blisters, Etc. Instantly 

Relieves ( hilblains, Frosted 

Ears, Stings of Insects, 

Chafed or Blistered Feet, 

Callous Spots, Etc., Etc. 

A coating on the sensitive parts 
will protect the feet from being chafed 
or blistered by new or heavy shoes. 

Applied with a brush and immedi- 
ately dries, forming a tough, trans- 
parent, colorless waterproof coating. 

Sportsmen, Motorists, 
Golfers, Mechanics, Etc. 

arc all liable to bruise, scratch or 
scrape their skin. "NEW-SKIN" wiil 
heal these injuries, will not wash off, 

and after it is applied the injury is 
forgotten, as "NEW-SKIN" makes a 
temporary new skin until the broken 
skin is healed under it. 

EACH 

Pocket Size (Size of Illustration), 10c. 
Family Size, .... 25c. 

2 07,. Bottles (for Surgeons and 

Hospitals), - - - 50c. 

At the Druggists, or we 

will mail a package any- 
where in the United States 
on receipt of price. 

Douglas ME. Co. 

96-102 Church St. 
Dept. W, New York. 



I am a constant reader of Recreation 
and could not do without it. Give it to the 
game hogs straight from the shoulder. 

I am glad to see the 3 in 1 ad again in 
Recreation. They make one of the best 
gun oils I have ever found. 

Charles Opp, Beaver, Ohio. 



"What's that building, pa?" 
"That, my son, is the Temple of Peace." 
"What's it for?" 

"It's a sort of club where nations wran- 
gle between wars." — Life. 




I thank you for the J. C. hand trap you 
sent me as a premium. I have given it a 
trial and find it a success. I thoroughly 
enjoy reading Recreation and shall always 
recommend it to all true sportsmen. 

J. Cady, Morrice, Mich. 



I received the Poco camera and am more 
than pleased with it. Am surprised that 
you can give such a premium for 6 sub- 
scriptions. Recreation is the best maga- 
zine. 

Robert Hunter, Neepawa, Man. 




NERVE FORCE from ANY CAUSE 

WINCHESTER'S SPECIFIC PILL. 



Cured 
by .. . 
contains no Mercury, Iron, Cantharides, or any 



injurious ingredient whatever. 



This Pill is purely vege! able, lias been tested and prescribed by physicians, and has proved to be the. best, safest, and most 
effective treatment known to medical science for restoring Vitality, no matter how originally impaired, as it reaches the root 
of the ailment. Our remedies are the best of their kind, and contain only the best and purest ingredients that money can buy 
and science produce; therefore we cannot offer free samples. 

Price ONE DOLLAR per W n Hfimhnd 
Box, by Scaled Mail, g P_J».M m .f> **!!»■ 



C. O. D. or Treatment Scheme 



PERSONAL OPINIONS: 



Dear Sirs: I have used a bottle of your Hypophosphites of Manganese for liver and kidney complaint in my 
own person and received much benefit; so I will enclose five dollars and will ask you to send me as much 
as you can by express prepaid for that amount, until we can get it through the regular channels. I am confident it is just what I have been in 
search of for many years. lam prescribing your Hypophosphites of Lime and Soda, and am pleased with the preparation. • 

Yours sincerely, Dit. 'P. J. WEST. 
I know of no remedy in the whole Materia Mediea equal to your Specific Pill for Nervous Debility. — ADOLI'H BEHEE, M. D., Professor of 
Organic Chemistry and Physiology, New York. 

Send for free Treatise, securely sealed. 

WINCHESTER. & CO.. Chemists. 717 Beekman Building. New York 
FOR WEAK LUNGS USE WINCHESTER'S HYPOPHOSPHITES, EST. 185H, 



XXX11 



RECREATION. 



A Duxbak 



Hunting Coat 





is the proper thing for 

A Shooter, 

An Angler, 
A Prospector, 
A Farmer 

or even a plain 
ordinary man. 



I will give you one of these coats 

For 10 Yearly Sntejtas to RECREATION 

These coats are made by Bird, Jones & 
Kenyon, Utica, N. Y., and are listed at 
$5. Thoroughly waterproof, and yet 
soft, pliable, practically noiseless and 
pleasant to the touch. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing 
furnished on application. 



Address 



Recreation 



23 W. 24th St. 



New York 



RECREATION. 



XXXlll 




Birmingham, Ala. 
Hot Springs, Ark. 
Los AngeleM, Cul. 
San FranclNco, Vn\. 
1170 Market St. 
West Haven, Conn. 
Atlanta, Ha. 



Washington, D. €., 

211 N. < s.pitol St. 
Hwlsht, 111. 
Marion, In<i. 
l>es Moines, la. 
Crab Orchard, Ky. 
Portland, Me. 



For Liquor and 

Drug Using 

A scientific remedy which has been 
skillfully and successfully administered by 
medical specialists for the past 25 years 

AT THE FOLLOWING KEELEY INSTITUTES: 



Lexington, Mass. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
St. Louis, Mo., 

3808 Locust St. 
Rouldor, Mont. 
North Conway, N. H. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



White Plains, N. Y. 
Columbus, O., 

Dciinlson Ave. 
Portland, Ore. 
Philadelphia, Pa., 

813 N. Broad St. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



Pittsburg. Pa., 

4346 Filth Ave. 
Prov idence. It. 1. 
Richmond, Va. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Waukesha, Wis. 
Toronto, Ont. 



Mr. Thompson — Jones told me a secret 
to-day. 

Mrs. Thompson (anxiously) — What was 
it? 

Mr. Thompson— The one I told you last 
wevk. 

I rs. Thompson — Oh, dear me ! Mrs. 
Jo.es is such a tattler. I'll never tell her 
anything again. — Judge. 



There was a young girl in the choir, 
Whose voice rose hoir and hoir, 

Till it reached such a height 
It was clear out of seight. 
And they found it next day in the spoir. 

— Clipped. 

For HUNTERS, ANGLERS, 
PROSPECTORS, RANCHMEN 

and all others who go 
into the Woods or Hills 



The Press 
Button 



Knife 



is the 
thing 




One-half actual size 



Our 5-inch Press Button Hunting Knife can 
not be excelled. Can be opentd with one 
hand, and will not open or close accidentally 



Send for Catalogue 
tion and prices of 



for descrip- 
other styles 



Mention Recreation. 

Handsome Stag: f\f\s^ 
Handle, Price VUC 

National Cutlery Company 

WALDEN, NEW YORK 



FANTASY. 
My gargoyle fancies, like a fleet 
Of spreading sails that veer and meet, 
Dip briskly down the distant sea 
And leave me sadly, grimly free. 

For every hope a bark lies yare 
To skim the far seas of despair, 
And, wearing down the ocean lane, 
Goes never to put out again. 

— James O. Tryon in N. Y. Sun. 



"What would you suggest as a name for 
my new yacht ?" 

"It seems to me the Floating Debt would 
be appropriate." — Chicago Evening Post. 

Hotel Nottingham 



COPLEY 
SQUARE 



BOSTON 

MASS, 




Elegant High Class family and Transient Hotel. 

Luxurious rooms, single or en suite. European Plan 
Exclusively. Excellent cuisine and tine orchestra. 
Centrally located and convenient to theatres and shop- 
ping districts, at the same time being in the most refined 
part of the city. Two minutes from Bach Bay sta= 
tion of IN. Y., IS. H. & H. R. R., and Huntington 
Avenue Station of IN. Y. C. & H. R. R. R. an<l 
B. & 4. R. R. Rates from $ 1 .OO per day and up. 

E. W, BOYCE, Manager, 



xxxiv RECREATION. 



Another Appropriate 
and Useful 



HOLIDAY 
PRESENT 



would be a 



LAUGHLIN FOUNTAIN PEN 

You can get one of these by sending me 

2 yearly subscriptions to RECREATION 

And any man or boy to whom you might 
give it would appreciate it and would 
find it extremely useful. You can get the 
2 subscriptions in 30 minutes. Why not 
makej some friend a present and at the 
same time make him happy? 



Sample Copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. Address 

RECREATION 

23 WEST 24th ST., NEW YORK CITY I 



RECREATION. 



XXXV 



Personally Conducted 
Tours to 

CALIFORNIA 



UTAH 
WASHINGTON 
OREGON 

and MEXICO 

VIA THE 

New York Central 

Lines 

Will move in January, Feb- 
ruary, March and May. 



For particulars, inquire of ticket agents of the New 
York Central Lines, or enclose a two-cent stamp for a 
copy of "America's Winter Resorts,'' to George H. 
Daniels, General Passenger Agent, Grand Central 
Station, New York. 



S] atts' Patent calendar for 1905 is out 
and ,s usual is a top liner. It has 3 full 
page caricatures representing groups of dogs 
and cats reveling in and singing the praises 
of Spratts' foods. The pictures are full of 
rich humor, character and action and the 
calendar is well worth a place in the office, 
in the den or the household of every cat and 
dog lover in the world. The calendar will 
be sent free to any one asking for it and 
mentioning Recreation. Address Spratts' 
Patent, Newark, J. J. 



"You were present during this trouble?" 
asked the magistrate of a witness. 

"Yes, yo' honah." 

"Then tell us, in a few words, just hoW 
the difficulty began." 

"Well, yo' honah," replied the darky with 
much gravity, "I think it was when the 
chairman of de entertainment committee 
swatted de secretary ovah he head wif de 
lovin' cup." — Collier's. 



The Baker Gun Quarterly for November 
is out and is chuck full of valuable in- 
formation for shooters. It is sent free to 
all who may ask for it and every man who 
is interested in shot gun shooting should 
have a copy. It is published by the Baker 
Gun Co., Batavia, N. Y. When asking for 
it please mention Recreation. 

IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN 
TION RECREATION. 




Why not spend the winter in Tropical Hawaii, where 
the climate is mild and equable ? Lowest temperature 
55 degrees, highest 89 degrees. Fine hotels, surf boat- 
ing and bathing every day of the year ; shooting, fish- 
ing, golf, polo and every sport and recreation. 

<£11A A A San Francisco to Honolulu and re- 
*pl IUiv/U turn, special rate to fifteen or more. 

The old legends tell us of the pot of gold awaiting him who shall 
reach the end of the rainbow. In glorious Hawaii, the promise of the 
rainbow is fulfilled. Balmy days and nights of noon-tide pleasure 
and midnight peace make it a veritable land of promise. If you 
desire pure enjoyment with rest and comfort, then seek Hawaii ; 
your wishes cannot there be denied. 

Special round trip rate on Canadian- 
Australian steamers sailing from 
Vancouver; Aorangi, January 6th.— From Port- 
land, Puget Sound and British Columbia Ports. 
Register now for a tour at any office of Thomas Cook & Son: New York, 
261 Broadway, Boston, 332 Washington St. ; Philadelphia, 830 Chestnut 
St.; Chicago, 234 S. Clark St. ; San Francisco, 621 Blarket St. 
Full information from all railroads. Souvenir 
book filled with photographs for the asking. 

HAWAII PROMOTION COMMITTEE 
Honolulu, T. H. 

New York, 874 Broadway Los Angeles, 207 W. Third Street 



$100.00 



Brotherhood 
Wines 

Are Made in America 
By Americans 
And for Americans 

They are pure, wholesome 
wines, and all good phys- 
icians prescribe them read- 
ily for their patients. 

Many experts pronounce Brotherhood 
Wines equal to those produced in 
the best French vineyards. 

Made By 

The Brotherhood Wine Co. 

EDWARD R. EMERSON, PRESIDENT 

Eastern Vineyards and Vaults at 
WASHINGTONVILLE, N. Y. 

N.Y. Office Cor. SPRING & WASHINGTON »T8, 




XXXVI 



RECREATION. 




"BRISTOL" 
CALENDAR 

for 1905 

This beautiful calen- 
dar is lithographed in 
ten colors and will be 
much admired wher- 
ever seen, as it is full 
of interest for all who 
enjoy out-door sports. 

We will send this calendar to any 
address on receipt of ten cents (in 
silver) to cover cost of mailing. 

The Hortoiv Mfg. Co. 

86 Hortoiv St. 
Bristol, Conn. 



Will you not kindly recommend 
Recreation to all such of your 
friends as are sportsmen ? Send me 
their names and addresses and I will 
mail them sample copies. I need the 
hearty co-operation and support of all 
true sportsmen and nature lovers in 
extending the circulation of this mag- 
azine. It is doing a great work in 
preserving the game, the game fishes, 
the song birds and the forests of this 
country, and the more people it 
reaches the greater good it can do. 
Please do not forget to send me the 
list of names. 

G. O. Shields, Edr. and Mgr., 

23 West 24th St., N. Y. 



( ^ 



I received the Korona camera which you 
sent me as a premium, in first class condi- 
tion. It is much better than I expected 
for so- few new subscribers and is all that 
you cfoim for it. I have tried it and am 
more than pleased with the clear pictures 
I get. 

R. C. Mounsey, Columbus, O. 



"So you lost your position as under- 
taker's assistant?" 

"Yes. I used to be a conductor on a 
street car, and I couldn't get out of trie 
way of telling people to step lively, please.'' 
— Washington Star. 



I received the Syracuse gun for the 25 
subscriptions to Recreation. Am much 
pleased with the gun, and I wish you and 
Recreation every success. 

V. Byers, Kushequa, Pa. 

Teacher — Suppose your father gave your 
mother $20, and then took $5 back again. 
What would that make? 

Tommy — All kinds o' trouble. — Philadel- 
phia Ledger. 

IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 



PATENTS 



promptly obtained OK NO FEB. Trade-Marks, 
Caveats, Copyrights and Label! registered. 
TWENTY TEARS' PRACTICE. Highest referenoss. 
Send model, sketch or photo, for free report 
on patentability. All business confidential. 
HAND-BOOK FREE. Explains everything. Tells 
How to Obtain and Sell Patents, What Inventions 
Will Pay, Bow to Get t> Partner, explains best 
meohanioal movements, and contains 800 other 
■ahjscts of importanos to iarsators. Addrm, 

H. B. WILLSON & CO. *&& 

7SBF ttntf.N.ff., WA8H8N8TQN, J 



RECREATION. 



xxxvn 




The 



Mattress 

Built, not stuffed" 

Each Ostermoor mat- 
tress is built— not stuffed. 
Handlaid sheets of snowy 
whiteness, each the full 
size, are carefully com- 
pressed within the tick. 
The Ostermoor is purity 
itself, germ-free and 
ver-min-proof. 
' Ostermoor mattresses 
bannot get lr.inpy ; rover 
need renewing ; an occa- 
sional sun-bath is all they 
require. The tick can 
be taken off and washed 
whenever soiled. 

Every hair mattress is a 
tick stuffed with animal 
hair, often swarming 
with disease germs. Our 
advertising has driven 
the old-line makers to 
claim "sterilized" hair, 
which is absurd ; for the 
only process that would 
be effective destroys the 
value of the hair— makes 
it brittle and lifeless. 

The hair -stuffed tick 
gets lumpy — has to be 
"made over" every three 
or four years, at a greater 
expense each time. 

Beware of imitations. The 
genuine has the name 
"Ostermoor" and our trade- 
mark label sewn on 
the end of every mat- 
tress as shown below. 



Our 136-Page B< 



We are proud of this book which has cost us $15,000 to 
issue. It is not a mere catalogue. It is pr-mted in colors 
and contains over 200 pictures by well-known magazine 
illustrators. It treats of sleep in its relation to life, 
"insomnia," its cause and cure, famous beds and 
their history. 

This 

book 

is 

sent 

on 

postal 

card 

request 



%'M 



30 Nights' Free Trial 



Sleep on the Ostermoor thirty Mights 
free and if it is not even 
all you have hoped for, if 
you don't believe it to be 
the equal in cleanliness, 
durability and comfort of 
any $50 hair mattress ever 
ll iiijIM^ made, you can get your 
money back by return mail 
— "no questions asked." 




Mattresses 
shipped, 1 
express 
prepaid/ 
same day* 
check Is 
received. 

.:; i 



Sizes and Prices: 
2ft. 6 in. wide, 25 lbs. $8.35 
3 ft. wide, 30 lbs. $10.00 

3 ft. 6 in. wide, 35 lbs. $11.70 

4 ft. wide, 40 lbs. $13.35 
4 ft. 6 in. wide, 45 lbs. $15,00 

All 6 ft. 3 in. long 
Express Charges Prepaid 

In two parts, 50 cents extra 
Specialsizes, special prices 

Ostermoor & Co. 

114 Elizabeth St. NewYork 

madian Agency .The Alas 
:ather and Down Co. 
Ltd., Montreal. 



Worth 
Double 





m 



HI 



XXXV111 



RECREATION. 



SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

These goods are all new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at 
which manufacturers and dealers usually sell. 
Here is a good chance to get 



A Book, a Gun, a Camera 
A Sleeping Bag, a Fishing Rod 
A Reel, a Tent, 



C FREE OF 
tCQST 



Subscriptions need not all be sent at once. They 
may be sent in installments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. When the required number 
is obtained the premium earned will be shipped. 



These offers are subject to change without notice. 



TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

TWO new yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation at $1 each, I will send a copy of 
Hunting in the Great West, cloth ; or 
a Recreation Waterproof Match Box, 
made by W. L. Marble and listed at 
50c ; or a Shakespeare Revolution Bait 
listed at 75c; or a Laughlin Fountain 
Pen ; or a dozen Trout Flies, assorted, 
listed at $1 ; or a pair of Attachable Eye- 
glass Temples, gold-plated, made by Gall 
& Lembke ; or one Rifle Wick Plug, made 
by Ilemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 
30 caliber to 50 caliber, or Shotgun Wick 
Plug, 20 gauge up to 10 gauge ; or an In- 
gersoll Watch or Cyckmieter listed at $1. 

THREE new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
safety pocket ax, made by W. L. Marble 
and listed at $2.50 ; or a dozen Bass Flies, 
assorted, listed at $2 ; or a pair of Shot- 
gun Wick Plugs made by Hemm & Wood- 
ward, Sidney, Ohio, 20 gauge to 10 gauge; 
or a Polished Buffalo Horn Gun Rack, 
made by E. W. Stiles ; or a Press Button 
Jack Knife, made by The National Cut- 
lery Co., and listed at $1. 

FOUR new subscriptions at $1 each, an 
Ideal Hunting Knife, made by W. L. 
Marble and listed at $2.50; or a Gold 
Medal Folding Camp Bed, made by the 
Gold Medal Camp Furniture Co. 

FIVE new subscriptions at $1 each, a copy 
of Cruisings in the Cascades, cloth; or 
an Ideal Hunting Knife made by W. L. 
Marble, and listed at $3 ; or a pair of 
lock lever skates, made by Barney & 
Berry, listed at $4.50 ; or a set of convert- 
ible Ampliscopes (5 lenses), listed at $5; 
or an Acme single shot gun, made by the 
Davenport Arms Co., and listed at $8 ; or 
a 32 caliber, automatic double action re- 
volver, made by Harrington & Richardson 
Arms Co. 

SIX new subscriptions at $1 each, a Hawk- 
eye Refrigerating Basket made by the Bur- 
lington Basket Co., or one dozen Eureka 
golf balls listed at $4. 

SEVEN new subscriptions at $1 each, a 

copy of The Big Game of North America, 

or of The American Book of the Dog, 

' cloth, or one set Lakewood golf clubs, 

5 in number, listing at $5. 



TEN new subscriptions at $1 each, a Cut- 
Glass Salad Bowl, made by Higgins & 
Seiter, and listed at $4.50 ; or a Water- 
proof Wall Tent 7x7, made by Aber- 
crombie & Fitch, and listed at $8; or a 
Rough Rider rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., and listed 
at $12 ; or a pair of Opera Glasses made 
by Gall & Lembke and listed at $10 ; or a 
Folding Hawk-Eye Film Camera, No. 3, 
S 1 /! x 4%, made by the Blair Camera 
Co., listed at $15 ; or a Reel, made by the 
Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., listed at $6 to 
$9 ; or a Duxbak Hunting Coat, made by 
Bird. Jones & Kenyon, and listed at $5 ; or 
a Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, listed at $6. 

TWELVE new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Daveny)ort Ejector Gun, listed at $10. 

FIFTEEN new subscriptions, $1 each, a 
Shakespeare Reel, Silver Plated, listed at 
$15 ; or a set of rabbit plates made by 
Higgins & Seiter, and listed at $8; or 
a Field Glass made by Gall & Lembke ; 
or a Kenwood Sleeping Bag, complete, 
with canvas cover, listed at $1G ; or a 
Bulls-Eye rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., and listed 
at $16; or a pair of horsehide hunting 
boots, listed at $10 ; or a Queen Hammock, 
made by the King Folding Canvas Boat 
Co., and listed at $15 ; or a Folding 
Hawk-Eye Film Camera, No. 4, 4 x 5, 
made by the Blair Camera Co., listed at 
$22.50. 

TWENTY new subscriptions at $1 each, 
a 14-karat Gold Hunting-case Watch, 
with Waltham Movement, listed at $20; 
or an Elita single shot gun, made by the 
Davenport Arms' Co., and iisted at $18; 
or a Queen Hammock, made by the King 
Folding Canvas Boat Co., and listed 
at $20. 

TWENTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, an 11-foot King Folding Canvas 
Boat. 

THIRTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Waterproof Tent, 14% x 17, made by 
Abercrombie & Fitch, and listed at $25. 

THIRTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, a 14-foot King Folding Canvas Boat, 
or a No. 20 Gun Cabinet, made by tli3 
West End Furniture Co., and listed at $33. 

FORTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Savage 303 Repeating Rifle. 

FIFTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
No. 20 Gun Cabinet, made by the West 
End Furniture Co., and listed at $48. 

SIXTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 9 F. 
grade Gun, made by D. M. Lefever Sons 
& Co., and listed at $90. 

SEVENTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, an 8 E grade Gun, made by D. M. 
Lefever Sons & Co., and listed at $110. 

TWO HUNDRED new subscriptions at $1 
each, a strictly first class Upright Piano, 
listed at $750. 

Address, Recreation &* Vo* th st> 



RECREATION. 



xxxix 



ONCREDIt 



R 



YOU CAN MAKE A 

DIAMOND 

YOUR SAVINGS BANK 



DIAMONDS 

PAY 20% 

ANNUALLY 



Gold IMedal Awarded 




t* 



The Loftis System 



** 




The Superior Jury at the Saiut Louis Exposition, after a full consideration of the claims 

of all foreign and domestic exhibitors, have awarded the GOLD iVfEBAX to us. 

This puts the official stamp of approval of the greatest exposition ever held, 

upon the LOFTIS SYSTEM — its goods, prices, terms and methods. 

You Can Use The Loftis System, SYooS oti ^S S^ ISSTth'raSSSS 

that you want from our Catalogue and we send it to you on approval. It costs you nothing to see it, for we pay 
all express charges whether you buy or not. If you like the Diamond sent, you pay one-fifth of the price and keep 
it, sending the balance to us direct in eight equal monthly payments. The monthly payments will be just the 
same as putting a monthly deposit in a savings bank and will pay much better. 

Vnii A t*£k \r/-k+- HTrf-kr> Pon A.*mm**T to have a Diamond Savings Account with us. We 
I OH ATS IN Ob 1 OO Tar AWSy open these accounts with honest people all over 
America. The ten dollar a week employe is just as welcome on our boons as is his well-to-do employer. Our easy 
savings terms make any honest person's credit good. 

T^£>"*r /^«»fiT*» Ti 7 ^Wtmn T>T"iai ? /3T m We also have a cash plan, and it is just as far beyond com- 
XTtXy VfrfSll AJL JL LP LI rlclcl* petition as our easy payment terms. Read this: Select any 
Diamond and pay cash for it, and we will give you a written agreement that you may return the Diamond any time 
within one year, and get all you paid for it — less ten per cent. You might, for instance, wear a fifty dollar Diamond 
ring, or stud for a year, then bring or send it back to us and get forty -five dollars, making the cost of wearing the 
Diamond for a whole year, less than ten cents per week. 

AOtTifTirtftc T-Tz»lv% With every Diamond or Watch, we will, when requested to do so, furnish 
w?dV 111^3 JLieip. you with one ol the LOFTIS STEEL SAFES for HOME SAVINGS. Drop 
your pennies, nickels and dimes into the little safe as you can spare them, and your Diamond will soon be paid for, 
and you will never miss the money. We make no charge for the safe, and when desired furnish a key with it. 

riiaranf^A €»nr\ T^~v frt art cSo 0ur Guarantee Certificate is the broadest and strongest 
UUdi alllCC dl IL4 Lj^tvLI tilll^C* ever given by a responsible house. We give one numbered 
and signed with every Diamond. We accept any Diamond ever sold by us as so much cash in exchange for other 
goods or a larger Diamond. No matter how long you have had a Diamond, it is always good for original value with us. 

"P>_ r ^i_ % HPT-i^ "NT *»"«/■ "Voar* T5-irfV»f- Write for our Catalogue, select your Diamond and 
.DCglll I He liCW 1 Cdl 1X1^1 11 « begin saving your money. Diamonds will be worth 
twenty per cent more than at present in one year from now. In the meantime, while saving you can have the 
pleasure and prestige of wearing a beautiful Diamond. 

f~\~ •» t» 1 Qft 8 ^ /^of-al^rf -i i/> ls * ne finest ever published, and shows the finest line of Diamonds, 
v-/Lll x*y\J%J KjaLctl%J& Lie Watches and Jewelry ever put on paper. We show many in- 
expensive articles, but nothing cheap or trashy. Every piece of goods that Is given a place in our 
Catalogue must stand the test of Loftis quality, the highest standard in the trade. 

^>ni IVPIlir ^ ou w ^ receive in addition to our 1905 Catalogue a copy of our 
w?L»>LJ. V Cllii • Souvenir History of Diamonds, more than a million copies of which 
were distributed at our Diamond Cutting Exhibit in the Varied Industries Building at the 
Saint Louis Exposition. Write at once to insure receiving a copy. 

LOFTIS BROS. &> CO. fe) 

Diamond Cutters and Manufacturing Jewelers 
Dept. A 82, 92 to 98 State Street, Chicago, 111 

Copyright 1904, Franklin Agency, Chicago. 




^BsEEHBfiffllBiBu 




xl RECREATION. 



Do you like to Shoot? 

If so, why not join the L. A. 
S. and help protect the 
game? 

I have spent more than 
$15,000 of my own money 
in this work, and all for the 
public good. Then why 
should not YOU spend $1 a 
year of your money to help 
the cause? 

If you have any good reason 
for staying out will you 
please tell me what it is? 

Address G. 0. SHIELDS, 
Pres't, 23 W. 24th Street 
New York City. 



RECREATION. 



xli 



For Your Bedroom 

" A cleverly designed chair with a dozen different uses." 

" Theltpvell Valet Chair 

The newest thing for the home. It has more practical uses 
than any other piece of furniture ever made. Think of an artis- 
tically designed high-back, substantial chair of beau- 
tifully finished quarter-sawed golden or weathered 
oak or mahogany finished birch that will 
hold and properly shape every article of 
a lady's or gentleman's clothing ! A 
chair that has a trouser and skirt 
stretcher concealed in the back — that will 
save tailor bills by keeping the wrinkles 
out, and pay for itself in a short time. 
Ladies will find many unique uses for it 
and at the same time it will be an orna- 
ment to the dressing room. Men like 
it because it holds an entire suit of 
clothes as well as underwear, shirt, col- 
lar, tie, and hose. There is a spacious compartmer.t in 
the seat for shoes,- slippers, brushes, etc. 

The Valet Chair will make a man glad and keep .Send draft or money order and we will send, you 

, , , I , .-. „, .i the chair prepaid this side of the Missouri River. 

woman happy. An appreciated sift. Write If not entirely satisfactory you may return chair 

-day for fully illustrated booklet— tells all about it. and we will refund the full amount paid. 

Alexander H. Revell S Co. m W £JS™ 





TO THE POINT. 

IT WAS UP TO HIM. 

"I was walking along the Strand, Lon- 
don," said a Boston business man, "when 
I was stopped by a dude of a feller who 
had the head of his cane in his mouth, but 
removed it long enough to say : 

" 'Aw, now, but I beg pawdon, doncher 
knaw.' 

' 'Do you, really?' I asked. 

" Ton honor, I do. Yes, beg pawdon.' 

" T can hardly realize it.' 
' 'But I do, doncher knaw.' 

" 'You actually and truly, and without 
any coercion on my part, beg my pardon, 
do you?' I asked. 

" 'Bah Jove, but I do, doncher knaw.' 

"And would you as soon state your rea- 
sons ?' 

" 'Well, you are carrying your cane in 
your right hand, doncher see? I beg paw- 
don — really I do.' 

''Yes, I see, doncher knaw, and what the 
devil would happen if I should carry it in 
my left?' 

" 'Bah Jove, but I don't knaw/ he replied, 
as a startled look came to his face, but I 
beg your pawdon, doncher knaw, and I'll 
ask young Lud Sudley next time we meet.' " 
— Chicago News. 



The young lawyer is a necessity, but fre- 
quently, like necessity, he knows no law.— 
Philadelphia Record, 




Shooting Jacket 

GUARANTEED all wool, seamless, 
elastic, close fitting, but not bind- 
ing, comfortable and convenient. 
Designed especially for duck shooters, 
trap shooters, etc., but suitable for all 
out-door purposes. Must be seen to be 
appreciated. Made only in two colors 
— dead grass and Oxford gray. 

Send \xs yoxif ».ddress for on© of 
o\ar Gun Ca.teJogs 

TheH. H.K1FFE GO., 523 Broadway.N.Y. 



xlii • RECREATION. 




Are You an 

Amateur 

Photographer? 



If so would you like a Camera 
that will photograph 

A whole range of mountains 

A whole sweep of river 

A whole army 

A whole fleet of ships 

A whole city 

Or any other ,r ast stretch of scenery or moving 
objects? THE SWING LENS DOES IT 





Is the thing. It lists at $30 



One of the greatest inventions of the age* 
Given as a premium for J 2 subscriptions* 



For particulars address 

RECREATION 

23 West 24th Street NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. 



xliii 



/■'Vv 



uxba 



Sportsmen's Clothing 

Sheds Water like a Duck's Back 

Absolutely waterproof in rain; light 
and cool in pleasant weather. Coat, 
trousers and hat made of fine soft duck, 
treated by a patent process that resists a 
dreary drizzle or driving storm. Lined with same 
material and double stitched throughout. Always easy and 
pliable in rain or shine. No rubber — no rustle. Perfect ventila- 
tion at all times. 

Coat has reinforced gun cap at shoulder; patent ventilated 
gusset under arm. Trousers reinforced from hip to knee. 
Double seat. 

In ordering, give snug breast measure, height, and length of 
arm from center of back. Give waist and leg for trousers. 
Ivight tan or dead grass color. Fit, finish and waterproof quali- 
ties guaranteed. 

Price, coat, $5.00 ; trousers, $3.00 ; hat, $1.00. Express prepaid. 
Sample of material and booklet free. 

BIRD, JONES & KEN YON, 1 Blandina St„ Utica, N. Y. 



"Well," said the humorous young man, 
who was watching the fireworks, "I don't 
see how the old Romans ever got to bed 
by the aid of those Roman candles without 
calling out the fire department." 

Here Prof. Sternmind, the eminent his- 
torian, turned on him. 

"From what we can ascertain by means 
of the records left by the elder Pliny and 
others," he observed, "we are forced to 
the conclusion that the ancient Romans 
never went to bed." — Judge. 



THE BOSTON GIRL'S APPETITE 
GOOD. 

Harry: Molly, you look good enough to 
eat. 

Molly : All you have to do is ask me to 
dine; I'll do the eating, air right. — Boston 
Transcript. 



The Luther gloves and the Laughlin 
fountain pen to hand and like the 2 other 
premiums I received from you, they are 
much beyond my expectation. My sup- 
port in the future you may be sure of. With 
many thanks for prompt shipment. 

Chas. A. Phillips, Dorchester, Mass. 



Goodwin : I hear you gave $25 to help 
repair the church? 

Graspitt : You have been misinformed. 
I merely subscribed that amount. — Chicago 
News. 



FOR 



Solid Comfort 

SUMMER or WINTER 

Get a pair of 

Thompson- 
Quimby 

Hunting 
Boots 

I Make the Best 

All work guaranteed. I refer by per- 
mission to the Editor of Recreation. 
Measurement blanks and prices on ap- 
plication. Menuon Recreation. 

T. H. GUTHRIE 

240 Halsey St, NEWARK, N. J, 




xliv 



RECREATION. 




Folding Canvas Boats 

were not satisfactory until the 



II -foot Special 



was produced. It's a revelation 
in boat construction, nothing 
like it ever made. Nonsinkable 
Cant tip over. Puncture Proof 
wear longer than a wooden boat. 
No repairs. No cost for storage, 
always ready, folds into a small 
neat package, carry by hand* 
used by the U. S. Navy. They are simple, wonderful. A thoroughly 
patented article. Beware of imitations. Made only by ourselves. A cat- 
alog of IOO engravings and 400 testimonials sent on receipt of 6 cents. 

Bottom Boards rest on the frame, not on the canvas, ribbed longitu- 
dinally and diagonally. They are stiffer and safer than a Woode r Boat 
because the lines are fuller, and are much easier to row or paddle. 

KING FOLDING CANVAS BOAT CO, 

Mention Recreation. KALAMAZOO, MICH., U. S, A 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

If you want a bromide enlargement of 
any of your photos which you prize highly 
I will make one, enlarged from your nega- 
tive, to 10x12 inches, and mount same on a 
14x17 card for 2 new yearly subscriptions 
to Recreation. Or I will make 2 of the 
same size, from the same or different nega- 
tives, for 3 new subscriptions. 

Why not have your prize choice pictures 
enlarged to a size suitable for framing, when 
you can have it done free ? Send draft to 
me made payable to G. O. Shields, and your 
negatives carefully packed, and I will send 
the enlargements promptly. 

E. W. Edington, Le Mars, Iowa. 



The beggar approached the bald man, 
who was enjoying his after dinner cigar on 
the veranda. 

"Please, sir," said the mendicant, "have 
you a copper you could spare?" 

"Sure," replied the man behind the weed. 
"You'll find him on the back porch making 
love to the cook." — Chicago News. 



The Harrington & Richardson revolver 
you sent me as a premium is a handsome 
little weapon and I thank you very much 
for it. I like it so well that I am going to 
get up another club of subscribers for you. 
Geo. O. Maggs, Sussex, N. B. 



A certain young man of great gumption 
'Mongst cannibals had the presumption 

To go — but alack, 

He never came back; 
They say t'was a case of consumption. 

— Yale Record. 



I am in receipt of the Bristol steel rod 
received through the premium list of Rec- 
reation. It is a prize worth working for 
and I am more than satisfied. 

J. N. Canoyer, Melrose, Minn. 



The buffalo horn gun rack which you 
sent me as a premium was duly received, 
and I am highly pleased with it. Success 
to you and your noble magazine. 

R. D. Bottum, Potsdam, N. Y. 




wondeWAuto-Marine Motor" $ 37.50 W 



Weight 37 l-'i lbs. Height 11 1-4 in. 
CONVERT YOUR ROW BOAT INTO A LAUNCH 

Rated, at i h.p. Has shown nearly 2 lip. No valves, pears, 
"springs or cams. Jump spark. Reversible. Speed control. Only 
three moving parts. Could not be made better if it cost five times 
as much. Order now — they are selling so fast you may be dis- 
appointed in the spring. Auto-Marine Motors from i to 20 h. p. 

Detroit Auto-Marine Co., 77 E. Congress St., Detroit, Mich. 

Formerly Detroit Lackawana Co. 



RECREATION. 



xlv 



Take good care of your 



A Prothero Gun Cabinet 

Made by 

JOHN N. PROTHERO, DuBOIS, PA., 
Makes it Easy. 



Send me 



J 5 new yearly Subscrip- 
tions to Recreation 

and I "will send you a Cabinet listed at $15* 



Sample Copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request 



Address Recreation 



23 W. 24th St. 



New York. City- 



Thanks for the Syracuse gun you sent 
to me as a premium. I shot at a ruffed 
grouse, at about 25 yards rise, and scored a 
clean kill, with the first shot. The gun 
suits me,- and so has Recreation suited me 
since 1894. 

Roland Travis, Bloomfield, N. Y. 



First Aeronaut : Couldn't you get the in- 
surance company to give you an accident 
policy? 

Second Aeronaut : No. They found out 
I was going to give up my business and 
settle in New York. — Life. 



The Czar sat still on his bombproof chair 

And merrily sang "Tee-hee ! 
I will not go to the blooming front 
For the front is coming to me — 

He-hee — 
The front is coming to me." 

—Puck. 



I have been trying Robin Hood smoke- 
less powder and Comet shells and for pene- 
tration, target and general results they can 
not be beaten. One more feather for 
Robin Hood's cap. 

L. W. Dewitt, Blackville, S. C. 

Chickens Free: Will give a pair of 
early hatched thoroughbred buff Plymouth 
Rocks for 4 new yearly subscriptions to 
Recreation, or a trio for 6. Ira D. Good- 
hue, Norfolk, Ohio. 



Most automobile troubles arise 
in the transmission case. The 
transmission of the Cadillac has 
solved one of the most difficult 
problems of the automobile. It in- 
sures perfect running, reduces cost 
of maintenance and repairs and gives 
greater power. It is simple, strong 
and noiseless. 
Every part of the 



h 



is built with care, 
thoroughness, and 
precision. The result is extreme 
durability and absence of annoyance 
to the operator. The speed range 
oi the Cadillac is from four to 
thirty miles an hour, the maximum 
speed being easily maintained with 
four passengers. Let us send you 
Booklet K, and give you the name of 
the nearest Cadillac agency where 
you can satisfy yourself that nothing 
at double the money equals the 
Cadillac. Prices, $750 to $900. 

CADILLAC AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 
Detroit, Mich. 

Member Association Licensed Automobile Manufacturers 



Model B 
$900 




xlvi 



RECREATION. 



Canvas Covered 
Paddling Canoes 

New Canoe catalogue for 1905 
ready about January 15th. 



High Speed 
Launches 

12 to 30 miles per hour 



THE FRASER HOLLOW 
SPAR & BOAT COMPANY 

GREENPORT, Suffolk Co.. Long Island, N. Y. 

J. G. FRASER, General Manager 



The Fraser 
Hollow 
Spruce Spars 

New Spar booklet and price list 
ready January 15th. 



Famous St. 
Lawrence 
River Skiffs 

Mention Recreation. 



S. K. Hooper, G. P. A., D. & R. G. rail- 
way, has been unusually active during the 
past few months in planting young trout in 
the streams reached by that road. More 
than 6,000,000 fry have been liberated since 
August 1st. This, in connection with the 
work done in previous season, means that 
sportsmen may reasonably expect to find 
good fishing in all the D. & R. G. territory 
within the next few years. 



Uncle Josh — They say that out in Kansas 
they raise corn 30 feet high. 

Uncle Eben — They do, hey? They must 
raise corn in ther West like we ketch fish 
in ther East. — Philadelphia Telegraph. 



m«Mthj^w^Toj:pt4ft Eaiacha; 




21 ft., $43.3 to S530; 18 ft., $360 to $478, Complete 

Not the lowest in price, but as low as consistent with 
quality and equipment. 1 3 different makes of Marine 
Engines in operation at our factor}', from X to 60 H. P. 
Motor Boats 16 to 75 ft., equipped with any power. 
The Matthews Boat Co. 



Cutulod IOc 



B.ASCOM, OHIO, t. S. A. 



"I never become angry because a man 
does not think quite as I do," remarked 
the professor ; "for when I find a man who 
disagrees with me I realize that it is prob- 
ably with difficulty he thinks at ail." — 
Judge. 



The gun Pop looked in wasn't loaded, 
And yet in Willy's hands exploded ! 
"What can't be cured must be endured," 
Said Willy. "Pop was well insured.'" 

—Life. 

Indian Baskets: I have a few rare and 
beautiful baskets made by Alabama In- 
dians living near me, which I will ex- 
change for yearly subscriptions to Rec- 
reation at the rate of one basket for 4 
subscriptions. Many dealers in Indian 
curios sell these baskets for several dol- 
lars each. Here is a chance to get one 
free. Nothing finer for a Christmas 
present. Full description and photo for 
5 cents. These Indians also make from 
the inner fiber of Spanish moss, the best 
saddle blankets in the world. These 
blankets are cool to a horse's back, do 
not become hard and stiff and will last 
for years, as they are well made and 
positively will not rot, the inner fiber of 
Spanish moss being absolutely impervi- 
ous to moisture. Will give one blanket 
for 3 subscriptions to Recreation. The 
above articles are guaranteed to give sat- 
isfaction. E. F, Pope, Colmesneil, Tex. 



RECREATION. 



xlvii 




You can build your own Launch — Sailboat — Row- 
boat or Canoe in your leisure time — evenings — 
and the work will be a source of profit and 
pleasure. It's easy when we show you how. 

SI 2 covers the cost of a $50 boat. Cheaper 
boats cost less in proportion. Write us — we'll 
tell you how. 

The Brooks System consists of exact size 
Printed Patterns of every piece, with Detailed 
Instructions, a complete set of Working Illus- 
trations, showing each step of the work, an 
itemized bill of Material required and how to 
secure it. 

Our system is so plain you cannot fail. A full Bized pat- 
tern of each piece with instructions that not only TELL, 
but SHOW you, by illustrations, every detail. 
Over six thousand amateurs successfully built 
boats by the Brooks System last year. Fifty 
per cent, of them have built their second boat. 
Many have established themselves in the boat 
manufacturing business. 

Patterns of all kinds and sizes from 12 to 55 ft. Prices from 
?2.50up — Catalogue and particulars FREE. For 25c 100-page 
catalogue containing valuable information for the amateur 
yachtsman, showing several working illustrations of each boat, 
and a full set for one boat. Full line of knock-down and com- 
pleted boats. When so ordered — Patterns are expressed, oharges 
prepaid, C. 0. D. to allow examination. 

BROOKS BOAT MANUFACTURING CO. 

Originators of the Pattern System of Boat Building 
501 Ship Street. Bay City Mich., U. S. A. 





American Magnate : What evidence can 
you give that you really belong to the Eng- 
lish nobility? 

Suitor: Well, I have no respect for 
women, and I'm dead broke. — Life. 



"Is your wife economical?" 

"Very ; she can fix over a $10 hat for 
$15 so it will look just as good as a new 
one." — Puck. 



I received the Davenport gun and am 
greatly pleased with it. Expect to send 
you another club in a short time. 

Connell Dignam, Leetsdale, Pa. 



Fay & 
Bowen 



Motors and 
Motor Boats 




Our Motors made the best record of 
any American motor in the British Re- 
liability Trials in August, 1904. 

No crank or handle used in starting. 

Our boats are perfect in construction 
and appointments. 

Send for Catalogue. 

Fay & Bowen Engine Co. 

74 Lake St. Geneva, N. Y., U. S. A. 

"Yes, thanks to my father's generosity, I 
ride in one of the finest automobiles on the 
boulevard." 

"Made you a present of it, did he?" 
"Oh, no ; I bought it myself, but he keeps 
it in repair for me." — Chicago Tribune. 

I have received the Press Button hunt- 
ing knife as premium and it is all right. I 
appreciate it and your promptness in get- 
ting it here. 

D. S. Featherstone, Everett, Wash. 



Mr. Beacon Street : I am about to 
broach a rather delicate subject 

Miss Ari Zoner : Fire away, old chap ; 
I'm fond of delicacies ! — Life. 



MULLINS* STEEL BOATS FOR SPORTSMEN 




Air Chambers 
Cannot Sink 
^No Repairs 
Always Ready 
Very Durable 
Low in Price 



^> 



"GET THERE" Duck Boat. 14 feet long, 36 inch beam. Price, $20. 

Crated on Cars Salem. 

Complete Illustrated Catalogue. Free on application. 

W. H. MULLINS, 228 Depot Street, SALEM, OHIO 

Mention Recreation. 



xlviii 



RECREATION. 




THE UPTHEGROVE SPORTING GOODS CO. 

Makers of High Grade Clothing 

VALPARAISO. INO 



UPTHEGROVE 

Waterproof Hunting Cloths 

English Corduroy — Moleskin— Rainproof 

Ma.ckma.vv and Waterproof Duck. 

Strictly Hand tailored to measure. 

10 oz. Waterproof Hunting Coat, $5. Extra Quality Rain- 
proof Hunting Coat, (finest coat made) $8; 5 per cent, discount 
If cash accompanies order. All our Coats have silk button holes 
and hand made silk pocket stays. In ordering give— breast, 
waist, length of sleeve and coat measurements, also height 
and weight. 

Write for free catalogue — If you want the best made — Try us. 

The Upthegrove Sporting Goods Company 
Dept. C, Post Office Place, Valparaiso, Ind. 

Mention Recreation. 



AN IMPORTANT OFFER 

For 2 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

I will send you 

A RIFLE WICK PLUG 

Made by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 30 caliber 
up to 50 caliber. 

A SHOT GUN WICK PLUG 

20 gauge up to 10 gauge 

For 3 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

A Pair of Shot Gun Wick Plugs 

20 to 10 gauge. 

Sample copies for use in canvassing furnished on 
application. 

Address RECREATION, 23W. 24th St., N .Y. City 

The Bail-Bearing Oarlock 

A device that will do for the rowboat 
what the ball-bearing did for the bicycle. 
Every ounce of energy utilized. No 
clanking or squeaking, in fact 
ABSOLUTELY NOISELESS AND 
FRICTIONLESS. The Ideal Oarlock for 
Hunting and Pishing. Furnished either 
for tight or loose oars. If your dealer 
does not handle, write for descriptive 
circular and prices. Mention Recrea- 
tion. 

T, H. GARRETT, Jr., Clark St., AUBURN N. Y. 



Hi Tragedy — How did you like Iowa? 

Low Comedy — Well, there is one town in 
the state I'll never forget. We were simply 
carried away with it. 

'jYou don't say?" 

"Yes, a cyclone arrived about an hour 
after we did." — Philadelphia Press. 




"It's hard to be worried by a lot of debts 
you can't pay." 

"Nonsense ! That's nothing to being 
worried by a lot of debts you have to pay." 
— Philadelphia Ledger. 



The L.A.S. furnishes cloth 
posters in any number de- 
sired, free of charge, offering 
a reward of $10 for each 
conviction for a violation of 
a game law. These posters 
have done great good wher= 
ever placed in deterring 
would=be law breakers from 
committing offences against 
the game, fish, and forest 
laws. Are you not willing 
to put up some of these 
posters? If so, how many? 



Free: — To any person sending me $i for 
i new yearly subscription to Recreation, I 
will send a deck of the celebrated golf 
playing cards. 

For 2 subscriptions, a fine artificial min- 
now listed at $i, or a spool of 50 yards of 
Kingfisher No. 5 silk casting line listed at 
75 cents. 

Arthur W. Bruce, 508 Woodward Ave- 
nue, Kalamazoo, Mich. 



Please accept my sincere thanks for the 
Weno Hawkeye camera which you sent me 
for 5 subscriptions to Recreation. I am 
well pleased with it. Shall send you more 
subscriptions soon. 

Cha-s. H. Kunz, Davenport, la. 



The Marble axe came all right and is a 
beauty. Thanks. 

J. S. Landon, Brant Lake, N. Y. 




Send for catalogue of our full line of Folding 
Canvas Boats and Canoes, which have been 
adopted by Governments of United States, Can- 

AOME FOLDING BOAT CO., MIAMIBBUK*. O. ^/^ ^ gland> j ugt fiUed an Qrder f Qr TJ. S . 

Government, who prefer our boats. Received medal and award at Chicago World's 
Fair. If you investigate we will get your order. Mention Recreation. 

Acme Folding Boat Company, Miamisb\irg, O. 



RECREATION. 



xlix 



The Colorado 
Onyx Co. 

236-237 Equitable BIdg;. 
Denver, Colo. 



QUARRIES 
Steamboat Springs, Routt Co., Colo. 



Capital 
Treasury Stock 



300,000 shares 
50,000 shares 



Par value One Dollar each, fully paid and 
Non-Assessable. 

No Stockholders Liability. 



Write for particulars as to price of 
stock to 

The Equitable Finance and 
Development Co., Fiscal Agt. 

Equitable BIdg., DENVER, COLO. 



James D. Husted, President. 

John H. Morse, Raymond S. Husted, 
Vice-President. Sec'y & Treas. 



For Sale. — A 20 gauge hammerless 
Parker gun ; weight, 6 pounds 1 ounce ; in 
perfect condition ; 26 inch barrels ; left, full 
choke ; right, cylinder. Stock, 14]/%, drop 
about 2^$, $80 grade. Will sell for $40 
cash. W. D. Gruet, Bo:: 640, Hartford, 
Conn. 



For Sale: — One canvas canoe, substan- 
tial and steady, 12 feet long, 30 inches wide ; 
also one Remington rifle, No. 4, 22 caliber,, 
as good as new ; $20 for both. — Veon Mon- 
crieff, Box 218, Kutztown, Pa. 

For Sale: 30 Golden Pheasants. Ex- 
ceptionally fine and high bred birds. Ad- 
dress, J. M. Studebaker, South Bend, In- 
diana. 



Miss Pert— Which half is it that doesn't 
know how the other half lives? 

Miss Caustique — The better half. — Phila- 
delphia Record. 

I acknowledge receipt of the Marble axe 
you ordered for me as premium. It is a 
little beauty and I thank you. 

J. M. Wallace, Toledo, O. 



»-.. P AID FOR RARE 1853 QUARTERS ; $4 paid 
«£0«# © for 1804 dimes; $15 paid for 1858 dollars; big 
prices paid forhundredsof other dates; keep all money coined 
before 1879 and send ten cents at once for a set 01 two coin and 
Stamp value books. It may mean a fortune to you. Address 
C. F. Clarke, Agent, Le Roy, N.Y., Dept. 3. 



How a 



Thousand 
Dollars 



Made a 

Million 

An Illustrated Booklet 
Sent Absolutely Free 

to Anybody 
addressing 

W. G. Vanderbilt 

No. 100 William St. 
New York City 



For a limited time I will give for $i 
one year's subscription to Recreation and 
a choice of any one of the following articles 
as a premium : 

A rifle cleaning rod, 22 or 32 inch with 
scratch and bristle brush; or a hard rub- 
ber water-proof match-safe; or a nickel 
folding drinking cup and dog whistle ; or 
a duck, snipe or turkey call; or a French 
brier pipe, or fountain pen; or soft kid 
money purse. All the above premiums 
listed at 50c. each. Or for 1 new yearly 
subscription I will give a Recreation water- 
proof match safe. 

For $1.15 I will give one year's sub- 
scription and a fine hunting knife 11 
inches in length when open,with stag 
handle, and retails at $1.25; or for $2 will 
give a year's subscription and a hunting 
knife, 7 inch blade, and sole leather sheath. 
Retails' at $4.50. These 2 knife offers are 
bargains. 

E. W. Jacobs. 

Coshocton, Ohio. 



Bic MONEY 

Can now be made in certain stocks by anyone 
with a capital of $5 to $10 a Month. We are in 

position to give you the only reliable inside in- 
formation. Write to-day. 

UNION SECURITY CO. 

604 Gaff BIdg. Chicago, III* 



RECREATION. 



w 



<' 



s 



^m ■-/. 



J* / J" 



*c> 



J 



"JUST RESTING" 

Was the way a dear old grandmother described 
her trip to California on the 

Golden State Limited 

" For once in my life I knew what it was to sit in the Lap 
of Luxury. I just lay back and let that strange western world 
glide by me — no effort — no worry — no strain upon either mind 
or body. I enjoyed every blessed minute, and was actually less 
tired when we reached Los Angeles, than when I left Chicago." 

BEGINNING December 25th, Golden State Limited leaves Chicago daily 
8.00 p. m., St. Louis 9.30 p. m., Kansas City 10.40 a. m. Arrives Los Angeles 
2.45 p. m., third day after. 

It runs via El Paso and Southern Pacific line through New Mexico — most Southerly 
route. Every mile is a mile away from winter. 

Send six cents in stamps for illustrated book describing train and service and 
reserve berths NOW. 

JOHN SEBASTIAN, Passenger Traffic Manager, 
Rock Island System, Chicago. 



RECREATION. 



li 




/es in a 
ir }t\ fe&j& factory at Hyde Paris. 

country in-.tbe hides of- cattls from 

,vo been js of i: 

from the latter. It is also brought ifrl 









Us 




4Av$jLU-i-as*jz&S& 



tails of horses i 

reign ports, ardraais which have < 
from the disease. Handlers of i 
l>tr <s in. the early stages of prepara- 
tion, in tanneries, morocco shops and: 
' curled hair factories are very, liable to 
Infection. * **!" 

The tenacity of the anthrax bacillus.'. 
ixsh that it defies the extremes 61 ' 
Uid cold, and it is equally active] 
[ whether the slrin or hide be wet or dry*] 
'Several precautionary measures hav< 
[been considered by English medl 
\me,n, and the most effective measure im 
i'said to be to submit the skins to ai 
-, thorough steaming' before, they are nut- c^k^ 
1 through the course of manufacture. /Z^y 
But this has not been possible with Va&4r 
pj'Orsejhair in cwlingr factories, 
f There have bein "cases where, deaibl 
pnabed within 12 hours 'after the patient i 
fame.; under,, observation, and other i 
peases where the duration of the disease 
feus'- four days and a half. 



THE " OSTERMOOR "-Built, Not Stuffed 

Each Ostermoor mattress is built— not stuffed. Hand- 
laid sheets of snowy whiteness, each the full size, are 
carefully compressed into the tick. The Ostermoor Patent 
Elastic Felt is purity itself, germ-free and vermin-proof. 
■ Ostermoor mattresses cannot get lumpy; never need 
renewing; an occasional sun-bath is all they require^ The, 
tick can be taken off and washed whenever soiled. 



° r **n fo "-"•. «nat tres , ~ ^ 



in 



&The disease has aroused such interest 



England that recently "the curled 
hair manufacturers -of- &.V \t Britain 

.agreed, not to use ^' 1&\^ X Siberian 

"Vl Sen 



rr Chinese : bo*^^ xs& z ao^ teas theyl 
i'ould be #ff^V e A <^ Woperlv 
^sinfec*^6* Z^o** &%<j * ~^- 



o* 





Send for Book 
Mailed FREE 

Our 138-page book, "The Test of Time," 
treats exhaustively the mattress question, 
and gives letters of praise from prominent 
persons. It also illustrates Ostermoor 
Cushions and Pillows for Window Seats, 
Cozy Corners and Easy Chairs; Boat 
Cushions, Church Cushions. May we 
send it? Your name on a postal will do. 

Beware of imitations. The genuine 

has the name "Ostermoor" and our 

trade-mark label sewn on the end. 

OSTERMOOR & CO. 

114 Elizabeth St. New York 

Canadian Agency : The Alaska Feather and Down Co.. Ltd., Montreal 



Hi 



RECREATION. 





SI 



Mounted in any style or in papers. 
Butterfly Pictures— (no pins) suitable 

for everybody. 
Butterfly Paper Weights for the 

writing desk. 
Butterfly Photo Frames for everybody 
Butterfly Collections for Collectors. 
Butterfly Cabinets J or entomologists. 
Entomologists' Supplies— Nets, Pins, 

Setting Boards, etc. 
Particulars free. Mention Recreation 



MARIPOSA NOVELTY CO. 



4830 

j Lang-ley Av. 



.) Glsvss Eyes for 
Stviffed Birds, 
and Animals 

g±sxsastf Materials 

Svippues 

Send 5c. in stamps for catalogue 

FRED. KAEMPFER, *<£££*$?« 

Taxidermy work done in all its branches 

Mention Recreation 




B. Bernard 

Buyer of Raw Furs and 
Ginseng Root. 

! 50 Bleecker St., New York. 



Quotations sent on request. 



NAVAJO BLANKETS 

Indian Beadwork, Baskets, Pottery. 
Moccasins, Alaskan Curios, Mexi- 
can Goods, Beads, Basket Material. 
If it's Indian we have it 

Send 6c. Stamps for Catalogue. 

BENHAM INDIAN TRADING CO. 

138 West 42d Street, Hew York City 

Mention Recreation. 



MNE MOUNTED GAME HEADS, 
BIRDS, ETC.. for sale at unheard-of prices. 
Send 10 cents for photos. {t 

JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine, 




You Ever snoot 




If so, you should have a copy 
of the group of 




shown on pages 370, 371 and 
372 of the December issue of 
Recreation. I had 300 Ar= 
tist's Proofs made from these 
plates before running them in 
the magazine. 

These are printed on one 
sheet of heavy enameled paper, 
placed end to end, so that they 
may be framed as one picture, 
and together they make a 
beautiful panel decoration, 
and a delightful reminder of 
happy days on the marsh or in 
the blinds. The set sells at 
$1. each. 

Hddiess Recreation 83 w.24tn st., ny. 

How to Collect Animal Tracks. 

A simple, inexpensive method of pre- 
serving accurately the footprints of birds, 
mammals, etc. Clean, instructive pastime 
for boys, girls, sportsmen and naturalists. 
Send 2 cent stamp for particulars, or $1. 
for complete instructions. J. Alden Ldr- 
ing, Owego, N. Y. 

Seashells Free! I have a good collec- 
tion of saltwater shells that I would give 
in exchange for 4 yearly subscriptions for 
Recreation, or would sell for $5. 

Harry Flipping, 30 W. Ohio Ave. 
Atlantic City, N. J. 



Date, 



190 



G. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 23 West 24th 5t. New York. 
Herewith find $1.00 for which please send me RECREATION one year 

beginning with . number, 

Name, 



Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT, AND SEND IN 



RECREATION. 



liii 



Catalogue of Firearms 



FOR SALE BY 



Van Allen Lyman, 256 Hudson Ave., Albany, N. Y, 

The following are all in absolutely perfect condition in 
every way, unless otherwise stated. 

Smith & Wesson 3244 target revolver, 6% inch barrel, blue 
finish, weight 2 lbs., 12 oz. Finish worn off in places, inside 
of barrel nearly like new. 

Holster and belt and Ideal reloading tools, cartridges, empty 
shells, primers — to go with the revolver. Price for the lot $10. 

Stevens .38 rim fire, Hunter's pet rifle, 18 inch octagon bar- 
rel, skeleton stock, weight 5 lbs. Aosolutely perfect in every 
way. About 75 cartridges to go with it. Price $4.00. 

H. & R. single barrel, 12 gauge, automatic ejector shot gun. 
Absolutely perfect, with canvas shell belt. Price $3.75. 

Colt .31 caliber powder and ball revolver, in serviceable 
shooting condition. Sear has been removed and cylinder has 
to be turned by hand. Price $1 75. 

Hopkins & Allen .38 caliber revolver, 5-shot, double action, 
nickle finish, perfect inside, good condition outside, 2% inch 
barrel. Price $1.25. 

Hopkins & Allen .22 caliber revolver, double action, nickel 
finish, 7-shot, perfect i.i every way, 4% in. barrel. Price $1.25. 

Winchester bullet mould, .38 long caliber, new and perfect. 
Cost $1 50 — will sell for 75c. 

Terms are cash in advance. Money returned immediately 
if goods prove unsatisfactory. Goods will be sent on approval 
C.O.U. if desired, on recept of money to cover express charges 
both ways. Detailed information about any of the foregoing 
for stamp. 

Free: — Black Squirrels and Parti-Col- 
ored Squirrels. — Will send a pair of either 
kind of these rare and beautiful pets to any 
one who will send me 12 new yearly sub- 
scriptions to Recreation. Will send a pair 
of handsome Fox Squirrels for 6 new 
yearly subscriptions. For 5 new yearly sub- 
scriptions I will give a tame young Raccoon 
or a pair of Opossums ;a young, tame Jack 
Rabbit for 4 subscriptions, and a pair of 
cute little Flying Squirrels for only 2 new 
subscriptions. 

Safe delivery of animals guaranteed to all 
parts of U. S. or Canada. E. F. Pope, 
Colmesneil, Tex. 

SOME GOOD SCORES. 

Fred Coleman, shooting the Parker gun, 
at 19 different shoots from July 27 to Oc- 
tober 6 inclusive, has broken 1,960 targets 
out of 2,065 shot at. This is remarkable 
shooting. In one event Mr. Coleman scored 
99 out of a possible 100, and made other 
exceptionally good scores. 

Mr. A. L. O'Connell, of Chattanooga, 
Tenn., shooting the Parker gun, October 
15th, made a score of 107 out of 108; one 
straight run of 82, finishing the day's pro- 
gram of 123 out of 125. This speaks well 
for Mr. O'Connell and the Parker gun. Mr. 
O'Connell is a strict amateur. 

Mr. M. E. Atchison, of Giddings, Tex., 
September 29 and 30 broke 312 out of a 
possible 350 at 18 yards rise. October 19 
and 20 Mr. Atchison, shooting at 295 tar- 
gets, broke 264, winning first high aver- 
age at 19 yards rise. In the handicap for 
the gold medal Mr. Atchison broke 25 
out of a possible 25, at 19 yards. These are 
good scores made by the Parker gun. 

Mr. J. E. Vaughn, Los Angeles, Cal., 
using the Parker gun, at 20 yards rise, 
October 7 and 8 broke 320 out of a possible 
360 shot at, winning high average for the 
2 days. Mr. Vaughn is a strict amateur. 

IN ANSWERING ADS PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 




Mounting a 
Wild-Cat. 



^r**"fcB"f fcrsmg^r* Why not mount your own 
C9$f\P* 191111311 Trophies? During the Shooting 

Season you will secure many line birds and animals. Mount 
them for your home and den. Save taxidermist's bills. En- 
joy your spare time and Increase your income, 

IT PAYS. Hundreds of leading sportsmen have taken 
our course, and are paying all gun and sporting expenses by 
selling their mounted specimens and doing work for others. 
You can do as well. If you want the most profitable of all 
"side lines," learn Taxidermy. We can teach you by 
mail. Our rates are reasonable and we positively guar- 
antee success. Endorsed by all sporting magazines in 
America. If you are a hunter, angler, or nature-lover, you 
will be interested in our new catalogue. It's yours for 
the asking. Write for one to-day. Mention Recreation 

The Northwestern School oS Taxidermy 
Suite A, Com. National Bank - Omaha, Neb. 

The only School of Taxidermy in the World. 



Diamondville, Wyoming. 
West End Furniture Co., 

Williamsport, Pa. 
Dear Sirs : — Your gun cabinet was re- 
ceived in good condition and is exceedingly 
convenient for keeping in order and stor- 
ing guns, ammunition, loading tools, fish- 
ing rods and other tackle. After once us- 
ing one of your cabinets I should greatly 
dislike being without one. 
Yours truly, 

R. C. Peterman. 



Silas : By hen, I never saw such a de- 
termined fisherman as Hiram. About 6 
hours ago he pulled up an old boot. 

Cyrus: What is he doing now? 

Silas : Waiting to pull up a mate to it. — 
Chicago News. 



Buxley — Aeronauts tell us that a wom- 
an's voice can be distinctly heard at an 
altitude of 3,520 yards. 

Trimble — Great Carsar ! It must have 
been my wife ! — Town Topics. 



INDIAN 

CURIOS 

'Wholesale & Retail 
Curio Dealers' 
sopply Depot. 
Bea<1 Work, Baskets, Elk Teeth, Mexican 
Goods, Beads, Fossils, Mi- erals, Arrow- 
Heads Pottery, Ahska Ivories. Shells, 
Abates, Photos, Great Sr.ock, Bi" Oata. 5c, 
stamps. Mention Recreation. II a dealer 
say so. L. W. STILWELL, 

Dead wood . . . , So. Dakota 






SHOOT OK? 

Surprising Results are 

1 secured by using this 

.new Improvement! It 

Will please you, and 

improve the accuracy 

[of your rifle. A stamp 

brings guarantee, cir- 

f culars, terms, etc. A 

trial will convince you ! 



liv 



RECREATION. 




The PHIL B. BEKEART CO. 



POWDER! POWDER! 

All kinds of powder for Rifles? 

Pistols and Shot Guns, 
measured accurately from 

i to 145 grains. 4 different measures 
in 1 . The latest and best tool. Ask 
your dealer for it. 

Every shooter should have 1. Send 3 
stamps for ideal Hand Book? 146 pages 
of information to shooters. 

IDEAL MFG. CO., 1 2 U St., New Haven, Conn., U. S. A. 

of San Francisco, Cal., Agents for Pacific Coast 



When you write kindly mention Recreation 



Slowboy (at summer resort) — I am go- 
ing to the postoffice, Miss Peachly. Shall 
I ask for you? 

Miss Peachly — Of course you may, Mr. 
Slowboy; but it isn't necessary to go to 
the post-office. You will find papa down in 
the billiard room. — Columbus Dispatch. 



"What's that book you're reading, papa?" 
"The 'Last Days of Pompeii,' my pet." 
"What did he die of, papa?" "An eruption, 
dear." — Exchange. 



Angry Patron — Hello, central ! What did 
you cut me off for? 

Boston Telephone Girl — Because you used 
a plural noun as the subject of a singular 
verb. You are not allowed to do that on 
this line, sir. — Chicago Tribune. 



Bacon — I see you've been investing in 
an electric fan. 

Egbert— Oh, yes; I thought I'd blow 
myself. — Yonkers Statesman. 



A Press Button Hunting Knife 

Is one of the best articles a hunter ever carried 




It has a 4 Inch Blade made of the Best Silver Steel 

The knife cannot come open in your pocket. It cannot close on your hand when in use. It opens and closes 
only when 

YOU PRESS THE BUTTON 

If you once use one of these knives you will never use any other. You can get one as a premium for 

3 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS TO RECREATION 

Sample Copies furnished on request. 

RECREATION, 23 West 24th Street, New York 



RECREATION. 



lv 




Have You a Dog ? 

We will send, if you mention its 
breed, l'olk Miller's Great Book on 
Dogs ; How to Take Care of Them ; 
Sen. Vest's Eloquent Tribute to a 
Dog, and A Yellow Dog's Love for 
a Nigger (the famous poem) all for 
10 cents, just to advertise Sergeant's 
Famous Dog Remedies. Address 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO. 
845 Main Street, Richmond, Va. 






Squabs are raised in i month, bring; big 
prices. Eager market. Astonishing 
profits. Easy for women and invalids 
Use your spare time profitably. Small 
space and capital. Here is something 
worth looking into. Facts given in our 
FREE BOOK, "How to make money 
- with Squabs." PLYMOUTH ROCK 
SQUAB CO., 289 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Living Wild Animals & Game Birds 

collected and furnished for 
Scientific and Propagating 
Purposes. Write for what 
you want. No catalogue 
issued. 

Chas, Payne 

Naturalist 
Box 913, Wichita,Kan. 



«j. b Xa a jsl e 

Buyer and Exporter of 

RAW JFXJRS 

i WEST THIRD ST. 

NEW YORK 
Write for price list. 



105 MILES AN HOUR. 

Uncle Sam's mail was brought into New 
York in record time October 13, 1904, 
over the New York Central & Hudson 
River Railroad, when the mail train, con- 
sisting of 6 cars, made the distance between 
Albany and the Grand Central Station, 143 
miles, in 142 minutes. 

The train makes no stops between Albany 
and New York, but it slows down at vari- 
ous points to take on mail. It left Albany 
one hour and 10 minutes late. When it 
rolled into the Grand Central Station 2 
hours and 22 minutes later it had made up 
all of this time except 7 minutes. In this 
regard all the records of the road are 
beaten. 

The run between Croton and Ossining 
was made at the tremendous rate of 105 
miles an hour. 

The Empire State Express, which makes 
regularly the best run on the road, carries 
usually 4 cars, sometimes 5. Car for car 
those on the Empire State are heavier than 
the mail cars, but the mail train was com- 
posed of 6 cars, all heavily laden, and, tak- 
ing these facts into consideration, a new 
record was made. 

IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 




TAXIDERMISTS ^nd FURRIERS 

Fvir and Curio Dealers Wholesale and Reta.il 

Every Description of Work in our Line done to Order. 

We carry a full line of Ladies' Furs, and will be pleased to 
send you anything you may wish in this line CO. D., with 
privilege of examination. Give us a trial on making up your 
Furs. We guarantee that you will be more than pleased with 
anything we may do for you. 

A mounted Deer, Antelope, Mountain Sheep head, Bear, Lion, 
Wolf or Fox head, or a Fur lap-robe, the warmest and best robe one 
can get, or a handsome Lion, Bear, Wolf, Wild Cat, or Fox Rug, or 
a nice Fur Muff, Boa, or Scarf, makes a beautiful and alway s welcome 
Christmas present, or a pair of Indian moccasins, the most comfor- 
table and durable house slipper possible. We have them. 

All work guaranteed moth proof. We have our own tannery 

All kinds ot tanning done to order. 

Highest prices paid for raw furs. Taxidermists' supplies 

Please mention Recreation 

McFADDEN & SON 



F 1632 Champa St. 



Denver, Colo. 



Near the front a man groans in deep dis- 
tress- 

"Repent !" shouts the evangelist, energet- 
ically. "Repent, and be at ease!" 

The man rises to his feet, irresolutely. 

"I am sorry," he falters, "that I ate the 
mince pie for dinner." — Puck. 



Homer — What's the difference in time 
between Chicago and Paris ? 

Rounder — That depends on the kind of 
a time you are looking for. — Chicago Daily 

News. 



She — Do you really enjoy whist, Mr. 
Finesse? 

He — Not at all, madam. I play a strictly 
scientific game. — Boston Transcript. 



"Collan-Oi 



tf 



preserves leather and 
renders shoes and 
harness positively 

WATERPROOF 

Used by the U. S 
the Army and Navy 
and National Guard. 

Send 25c. for trial can. 
AGENTS WANTED 
Write for terms and circulars 

J. R. BUCKELEW 
Dept. A. j j J Chambers St., N. Y. 



\AkferproojF 

LEATHER 

DRESSING 

« - AND 

RUST 

'&: PREVENTER 



Ivi 



RECREATION. 



A Great Head 





X 







Here is a reproduction of a photograph 
of one of the largest and best Rocky moun- 
tain sheep heads in existence. The horns 
measure i6 l / 2 inches in circumference at 
the base, and 16 inches out from the skull 
they still measure 16 inches, having tapered 
only y : > inch in that distance. The length 
of each horn is 39 inches and the spread 
at the tips is 17 inches. The horns make 
nearly a complete turn, and if they had not 
been broken in lighting, would undoubt- 
edly have passed the starting point. Most 
naturalists and collectors place an ad- 
ditional value on horns that are broken 
more or less, as such damage- indicates the 
natural courage and pugnacity of the ani- 
mal. This ram had evidently spent much 
of his life looking for trouble, at least 6 
inches having been -broken from the point 
of each horn. 



The horns and skull weighed, before 
mounting, 39 pounds. The head was 
mounted by John Murgatroyd, 16 North 
William street, New York city, who, as the 
picture shows, has done an admirable piece 
of work. Mr. W. T. Hornaday, Director 
of the New York Zoological Society, pro- 
nounces this one of the best pieces of taxi- 
dermy he has ever seen done on a sheep 
head. Many taxidermists fail to get the 
natural shape and expression about the 
nose, but Mr. Murgatroyd has reproduced 
this feature accurately, as well as all the 
others. 

This sheep was killed by an Indian in 
the Rocky mountains, North of Laggon, 
B. C. 

The head is for sale, address G. O. 
Shields, 23 West 24th street, N. Y. 
Price ; $300. 



RECREATION. 



lvii 



Newhouse Steel Traps 

Do you know the Newhouse Trap Spring? It has a world- 
wide reputation and is absolutely guaranteed. The Newhouse 
Trap is made in all the regular numbers and 

l • 1 • te S. NEWHOUSE 

several special sizes. ^ onesda cowmunsty 

Every genuine Newhouse Trap is stamped n. ¥. 




No. 2> T A Otter Trap. For those who wish a large single spring trap. 



Write for illustrated catalogue. 



Mention Recreation, 



Oneida Community (Ltd.) 



9 



Y. 



Send 25 cents for "Trapper's Guide," which describes habits of animals and best ways to catch ther 



"Hist !" whispered the politician's wife 
in the dead of night; "there are robbers in 
the house !" 

"Yes," replied the politician, sleepily, 
"and in the Senate, too. But why should 
that worry you?" — Philadelphia Press. 



"It is true I have known you but a short 
time, Miss Roxley," said Mr. Skemmer, 
"but I assure you my love for you is as 
deep and boundless as the ocean and " 

"But infinitely more fresh," interrupted 
the wise heiress. — Philadelphia Press. 



Seated in an "L" train were Jones and 
Brown. 

Brown: Who is -that homely woman at 
the end of the car ? 

Jones : That's my wife. 

Brown : But you are not looking. 

Jones : I don't have to.— Exchange. 



First Busy American — Commuting now, 
are you ? How do you like the place you're 
living in ? 

Second Busy American — Well, you see, 
I haven't spent a Sunday there yet, and it's 
hard to judge a place in the dark. — Life. 



I received the Bristol steel rod, and I 
would not trade it for my father's $18 split 
bamboo rod. Thank you very much for the 
premium. 

Harry C. Browne, Detroit, Mich. 



Practical Common Sense CAMP 
in 6 Sizes. STOVE 

Either with or with- 
out oven. The light- 
est, strongest, most 
■^ compact, practical 
jfi) stove made. Cast 
|1 combination sheet 
steel top, smooth out- 
side, heavy lining in 
tire box and around 
oven, holds its shape, telescopic pipe carried inside the 
stove. Burns large wood and keeps fire longer than any 
other. Used by over 9,000 campers and only one stove 
returned. 

For catalogue giving full particulars, mention Recrea- 
tion and address 

D. W. CREE , Manufacturer, Griggsville, III. 




The Hawkeye camera arrived in due time 
and I am much pleased with it. Accept my 
thanks. 

Edward Hamilton, Bridgeport, Conn. 



Can You Shave? 

Rub a little "3 in One" 

on your razor strop till 

leather becomes soft and 

pliable ; draw razor blade 

[^ between thumb and finger 

l^. moistened with "3 in One"; 

' £ then strop. The razor cuts 

> S times as easy and clean; 

holds the edge longer. "A 

^ Razor Saver for Every 

Shaver" which gives the 

scientific reasons, and a 

generous trial bottle sent[ 

free. Write to-day. 

G W. COLE CO. 

122 Washington life Bldg. 

flew York. 



Iviii 



RECREATION. 






This cat shows Forend Ejecto , Simplest on earth, only three r arts, Always works. 








Abov<; cuts sho<v the double tnick nitro breech with cross bolt and tinder fastening, 

the narrow skeleton rib, 6 ounces lighter than any other, tapering 

gracefully from'breech to muzzle. 




The simplest, most durable and fastest lock in the world. 

If you don't know what gun to buy order an Ithaca and a gun of 
any other make, compare them, and if the Ithaca is not the best by 
all odds, return in IN. 13.— The Ithaca Sticks. 

Send for Art Catalog and Special prices on 16 Grade Guns, $17.75 to $300. 
Mention Recreation. 




RECREATION. 



lix 



Marble's Revolver Rod 

This is a handy and handsome little tool 
for men who take pride in their arms. The 
rod proper is made of solid brass with our 
patented steel swivel. The hollow nickeled 
handle will hold a Marble cleaner. 

For 7 l / z inch, ox ^ l / 2 inch barrel and under, 
choice of ends, price postpaid, $1.00. Men- 
tion caliber. Joints are. 4 inches long. Ex- 
tra joints, 15c; ends, 15c. 

Marble's Brass Rifle Rod with strong 
steel joints, postpaid, $1.00. 




Marble's Rifle Cleaner 




M^MFfl^fi, 



dM SBJBJSJ5 *!3saa 







(Garrison's Patent) Brass %zxl-z.z washers on a spiral spring steel wire. 

We knew after the fhst time we tried this cleaner that it was a wonderful implement and that 
we would have a large sale for it. But we did not guess big enough, for it is selling faster than 
any new specialty we ever put out. Why ? Because it takes out every particle of burned smoke- 
less powder and lead. Because it does the work faster and easier than any other cleaner. Because 
it is cheaper, for one will last a man a lifetime. We have one we have used over 200 times in clean- 
ing rifles- It is still in just as good condition for service as ever. It is kept this way by oc- 
casional scraping and turning of the washers. We guarantee that it will not harm your rifle. 

Price postpaid, 50c. Mention Caliber. 

Send for catalogue of extra quality specialties. Mention Recreation. 

Marble Safety Axe Co, t DepL A t Gladstone, MicL 



Yeast — "Whenever some new territory is 
opened up there is always a rush for the 
place, is there not?" 

Crimsonbeak — "Well, not if a volcano 
opens up the territory." — Yonkers States- 
man. 



The Davenport single gun which you 
sent me several weeks ago for a club of 
subscribers is well made and shoots ex- 
ceedingly well. Penetration and pattern 
are excellent. F. C. F., Palo, Mich. 



I received the Mullins "Get There 
boat and am much pleased with it. 

Wm. Collins, Decatur, 111. 



duck 



"Here you 2," yelled the stevedore, "han- 
dle that gunpowder careful !" 

"What's the matter wid it?" demanded 
Casey and Reilly in one breath. 

"Don't you know some of that powder 
exploded 2 years ago and blowed up 10 
men?" 

"Sure that couldn't happen now," replied 
Casey. "There's only 2 of us here." — Cath- 
olic Standard and Times. 



Farmer — "Hi, there ! Can't you see that 
sign, 'No fishin' on these grounds' ?" 

Colored Fisherman — "Co'se I kin see de 
sign. I'se cullid, Boss, but I ain't so igno- 
rant as ter fish on no grounds. I'm fishin' 
in de crick." — Exchange. 



15he 
DAVENPORT 
1905 MODELS 



Embody all the latest im- 
provements in modern gun 
construction. They 
are the stan- 
dard of ex- 
cellency. 




Ix 



RECREATION. 



For 15 years 





has been the leading and at one time the only 

DENSE SMOKELESS POWDER 

It always runs regular. Insist 
upon getting shells loaded with 
it. If you can't get them, write to 



villi Y vl 1111 ££ 9 

302=304 Broadway 




uElCS 

New York City 



Something Special — Playing Cards 

Free : — To each person sending" me $1 for 
one year's subscription to Recreation, or 
sending it direct to be placed to my credit, 
I will forward all charges prepaid, a pack 
of elegant gold edge playing cards. These 
are no cheap second quality cards but first 
quality of extra selected stock, highly 
enameled and polished, fancy set pattern 
backs, each pack wrapped in handsome 
glazed wrapper and packed in strong tele- 
scope case. L. J. Tooley, 
141 Burr Oak St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 



IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 



THE CAMPFIRE. 

Cold night weighs down the forest bough, 
Strange shapes go flitting through the 

gloom. 
The wilderness is home ! 

— Edwin L. Sabin, in The Criterion. 



Miss Kremey, (in bookstore) : Have 
you Moore's poems? 

Clerk : Yes, miss ; I'll get 'em for you. 
By the way, here's a splendid story called 
"Just One Kiss." 

Miss Kremey (coldly) : I want Moore. 
— Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



THE MALCOLM RIFLE TELESCOPIC SIGHT 

IS ACKNOWLEDGED TO BE THE BEST PLACED ON THE MARKET 





We are Originators not Imitators. All of our Outfits are first class 
Any advice regarding the best power and length Tube for Hunting or Target 
purposes given when requested. SEND FOR OUR LA TEST CA TALOGUE. 

Mention Recreation. 

THE MALCOLM RIFLE TELESCOPE MFQ. CO. 

F. T. CORNISH, Mgr. 
Established 1857 SYRACUSE. N. Y., U. S. A. 



RECREATION. 



lxi 



One of the 9 



Built for Business 
"A" GRADE $£Q LIST 

lii offering this gun to the public, we have combined 

ALL Ok< THE DISTINCTIVE inPROVEHENTS 

which have gained for the " Syracuse" its present prominent position 
among American Arms. 



mmsm 







it, 



A" GRADE 

Condensed Description. 



BARRELS— Fine quality of Damascus Steel, or if desired, we will 
furnish Krupp Fluid Pressed Steel Barrels, made at the Krupp 
Works, Essen, Germany, and imported to our order. 

STOCK — Imported Italian Walnut, finely figured and dark rich color. 
Full pistol or Straight Grip as desired. 

AUTOMATIC EJECTOR— With our Patent Non-Ejector device 
which allows the gun to be instantly changed from an Auto- 
matic to a Non- Automatic Ejector. 

This model gun is handsomely engraved and cleanly finished, and will 
compare favorably with any gun on the market listing at $ 100.00. 

All "Syracuse" guns for 1905 will be built with our New Compensat- 
ing Double Cross Bolt; and Frames Inletted into Stock, thus 
preventing the spreading or splitting of same. 

Catalogue yours for the asking. Mention "Recreation" 

SYRACUSE ARMS CO. Syracuse, n. y. 



lxii 



RECREATION. 





re Is Another ! 



If you will send me 15 yearly subscriptions to 




I will send you a high-grade, powerful 







s 



Listed at $15 



A field glass is indispensable to every hunter, and 
this is one of the latest and best on the market for 
the price. I have but a few of these instruments on 
hand and the offer will be withdrawn as soon as the 
supply is exhausted. Therefore, if you want one 
start immediately. Sample copies of Recreation 
for use in canvassing furnished on application. 



Address RECREATION, 23 W. 24th St., IN. Yo CIl* 



RECREATION. 



Ixin 



Price 



SAVAGE JUNIOR 



It is " Savage Quality " all Through 

While the Savage "Junior" is a bolt action rifle, it is 
radically different than any other rifle of this type on 
the market. Like all other Savage rifles it is distinctly 
ingenious and workmanship the best. Shoots short 
long and long rifle cartridges. Perfect accuracy guar- 
anteed. If your dealer can not supply you, send us $4. 
and we will deliver to any address in U. S. 

Savage Arms Co. 



Catalogue No. G, Free 



• $ 



"Been in a fight?" asked the inquisitive 
person. 

"Not exactly," replied the absent mind- 
ed man. "While shaving myself this 
morning I tried to lather myself with the 
razor." — Chicago Daily News. 



Gabber — You ought to meet Dyer. Awful- 
ly clever imitator. He can take off any- 
body. 

Miss Duncan (wearily) — I wish he was 
here now. — Tit-Bits. 



"Dear Teacher — Kindly excuse Minnie 
for having been absent yesterday, as she fell 
in the mud on her way to school. By doing 
Ihe same vou will oblige her mother." — Tit- 
Bits. 



Robin Hood Powder* Co., Swanton, Vt, 

Dear Sirs, I received the Comet shells 
you sent me by express. Please accept 
my thanks. I have been using your powder 
this fall and am much pleased with it. 
Have recommended it to all my friends. 
Frank E. Busiel, Laconia, N. H. 



Fond Papa : Johnny, the stork has 
brought a new baby to our house; would 
you like to see it? 

Little Johnny: No; but I would like to 
see the stork. — Chicago Journal. 

"Johnny, do you like to go to school?" 
"Yes, ma'am, and I like coming home, 
too, but I don't like staying there between 
times." — Philadelohia x'ublic Ledger. 



High Grade but not Hi 

BAKER. GUNS 
Haimmer a.nd He^mmerless 



Built for Hard 
Service ©end to 
v. last a lifetime 




Send for FREE QUARTERLY and 1!M);> Kooklet Fully 
Describing all Grades with Prices. Mention Recreation. 

Baker Gun & Forging Co., >£&. Batavia, N. Y 



lxiv RECREATION. 



FOR THE HOLIDAYS 



An Appropriate Present 
would be a set of beautiful 

Hunting and Fishing Pictures 

15 Plates Size for framing, 18x24 inches 



SUBJECTS: 

Elk Hunting — Salmon Fishing — Moose Hunting — Trout 

Fishillg Hy. Sandham. 

Mallard Shooting — Black Bass Fishing 

C. E. Denton 

Tarpon Fishing — Blue FisTiing 

Fred S. Cozzens 

Antelope Hunting — Goose Shooting 

Fred Remington 

Grouse Shooting — Wild Turkey Hunting 

R. F. Zogbaum 

Muskalonge Fishing 

F. H. Taylor 

Deer Hunting 

A. B. Fiost 

Rocky Mountain Sheep Hunting 

E. Knobel 

These 15 plates are lithographed in true colors of nature, and altogether make 
one of the finest series of pictures of out-door sports ever published. 

ORIGINALLY ISSUED AT $50 A SET 

I have bought the last of them and can furnish a complete set for 

15 Yearly Subscriptions to Recreation 

Or will sell at $10 a Set 



Address 

RECREATION, 23 W. 24th St. 

NEW \ORK CITY 



RECREATION. 



lxv 



Special Bargains in Hammerless Guns 

We offer at these SPECIAL PRICES a small lot of a 

Standard American 




make 
ing 



reecK Load- 
Guns 



$31.00 grade Gun, fine tw 
$41.00 with Automatic 
$40.00 Damascus Barre 



Entirely new. Made on Interchangeable 
System. Top Lever Action. Greener 
style Cross Bolt-Pistol stock. 26, 28 and 
30 inch. 12 and 16 bores, at the following 
Exceptional Prices : 



Send $5 with order, and if the Gun is not satisfactory upon receipt it may be returned and money refunded less 
cost of expressage. Or if the whole amount of money is sent with order a Victoria Canvas Case is included. 

Always in stock a full line of high-grade GUNS 

W, & C SCOTT t JOS. LANG & SON, London 

and others, in addition to Parker, Remington and all the American makes. 



JUST NOW ON HAND 

Also large lot "Hammer Double Guns," 

ten and twelve bores, many of them second- 
hand, taken in trade. Prices 

$8 to $15 



Also lot of Lee Straight-Pull Magazine 

Rifles, small bore, made by the Winchester 
Arms Company and cost over $25 each, long 
range and very accurate, in nice refinished brown, 
condition same as new. Suitable ^» ^^ 
for target or hunting. Price, each ^/»JvJ 



Send Six Cents in stamps for Catalogue of New, also of Second-hand Guns 

WM. READ & SONS, 10? Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



"You have a tough looking lot of cus- 
tomers to dispose of this morning, haven't 
you?" remarked the friend of the magis- 
trate who had dropped in at the police 
court. 

"Huh!" rejoined the dispenser of justice, 
"you are looking at the wrong bunch. 
Those are the lawyers." — Chicago Daily 
News. 



Statistics show that the average height 
of the American woman is 2 inches more 
than it was 25 years ago. Yes, they come 
higher, but we must have them. — New- 
York Sun. 



THE BOSTONIAN'S INCIDENTAL 
REMARK. 

He — Will you marry me? 

She — No, thank you. 

He — I thought perhaps you wouldn't. 
How do you like that continued story that 
is running now in The Atlantic? — Somer- 
ville (Mass.) Journal. 



"You know Jones, who was reputed so 
rich ? Well, he died the other day and the 
only thing he left was an old Dutch clock." 

"It won't be much trouble to wind up 
his estate." — New Orleans Times-Democrat. 



Iff 



Aim, 

Ambition, 
Motives ^e 




To please our patrons in every de- 
tail, and to give them the BEST 
possible, production of the GUN 
MAKERS ART. We do not try 
to see how cheap a gun we can 
make, but rather HOW GOOD. 
Remember the BEST is always 
CHEAPEST, and none too good 
for you. Send for catalogue 
Mention Recreation. 



Parker Bros, 



33 Cherry St. 

Meriden, Conn. 



lxvi 



RECREATION. 




Description 

32 Caliber, 5 shot. 2 inch Barrel. Weight, 12 ounces. 
C. F., S. & W. Cartridge. Finish, Nickel or Blue." 

Impossible to ceUch on the pocket and discharge accidentally. 

Absolutely Saie. Although designed for cyclists, this revolver is equally adapted 
to all cases where a small, light weight, effective and handy pocket weapon is 
desired. It has a small frame and automatic ejector. Sold direct where dealers 
will not supply. Mention Recreation when writing. 

HA&MNGTOM & MCHARDSON ARMS CO. 

MaKers of li. & R. SINGLE GUNS 

aSFS? f ° r P ° SS " S WORCESTER, MASS. 




Mr. Klose : I'm glad to see some women 
have begun a crusade against the killing of 
birds for hat trimmings. It certainly is a 
cruel . 

Mrs. Klose: It is cruel, dear, and I just 
hate to wear my last winter's hat, because 
it has a bird in it. I saw a lovely hat down 
town to-day for $40 that hasn't even a fea- 
ther in it. Let me buy it to-morrow. — Phil- 
adelphia Press. 



I was asked by a charming young Mrs.: 
"Pray, what's the best way to give krs.?" 

Then, in spite of her fears, 

I seized both her ears, 
And showed her, and said: "My dear, 
thrs. !" — Exchange. 



Tommy — Ma, I wish you'd give me some 
cake. 

Mother — Tommy! Didn't I tell you not 
to ask for any cake? 

Tommy — I ain't askin' ; I'm jest wishin'. — 
Philadelphia Ledger. 



The Bristol rod ydu sent me as a pre- 
mium is beautiful and, seems like a gift, 
as it was ordy a few minutes' pleasure, not 
work, to secure these subscriptions. Thank 
you for your promptness and courtesy. 
Chas. D. Johnson, Jamestown, N. Y. 

He who fights and runs away 

From awful battle scenes, 
May live to write them up some day 

For all the magazines. — Puck. 



IFFFUFR H 'S h CradeTrap and Feather- 
LLi LELI1 weight Field Guns 




The only American makers putting on single trigger 
guaranteed to work perfect under all conditions. 



PBICE 
$60 TO 

$400 



D. M. Lefever, Sons & Co. 



Li 



Not connected with 
Lefever Anns Company 



Defiance, Ohio. 



Send for 

1904 
Catalogue 

Mont ion 
RECREATION 



RECREATION. 



lxvii 



rsmi.vz5zmsM*» i > »Mm m imkw* ,> MM..n t;,.* 



For Trap Shooting 



There is no ammunition on the market equal 
to Robin Hood Loaded Shells. Ask 

any man who has tried Robin flood and all 
other brands on the market. Robin Hood 
Loaded SS*eiis are handled by live dealers 
in nearly all important towns and cities. If 
your dealer does not keep them, let us know. 
Our ammunition was good from the first, but 
is being steadily improved in quality. For 
those who prefer a cheaper grade, we make 
and load a Black powder shell, that is cheaper 
than smokeless and which still embodies some 
of the good qualities of Robin Hood Smokeless. 

Full particulars by mail. Send for free illus- 
trated booklet entitled "Powder Facts." Address 

The Robin Hood Powder Co. 

SWAN TON, VT« 

Mention Recreation. 




lxviii RECREATION, 



TO 
AMATEUR 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 



Here is a Chance 
to Get a 

FINE CAMERA EASILY 



A Petite Century, No. 2, 4x5, listed at $15, for 15 new 
yearly subscriptions to Recreation. 

A Century Camera, model 42, 4x5, listed at $24, for 
24 new yearly subscriptions to Recreation. 

These are both neat, compact, well-made and handsomely 
finished cameras, capable of doing high-class work. 



Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. 



Address RECREATION 

23 West 24th St. New York. 



RECRF4TI0N. 



lxix 



That Strangers May Know 
I Offer a Dollar's Worth Free 




I know of a remedy for certain forms 
of illness that brings the utmost relief 
that medicine can. I am so sure of it 
that to any ailing one who has not tried 
it, I will willingly give a full dollar's 
worth free to test. 

My offer is born of confidence unlini- 
ited. I ask no deposit — no promise. 
There is nothing to pay either now or 
later. The dollar bottle is free. 

Mine is no ordinary remedy. It repre- 
sents thirty years of experiment — thirty 
years at bedsides — in laboratories — at 
hospitals. Thirty years of the richest 
experience a physician can have. I tell 
below wherein my remedy differs, radi- 
callv, from other medicines. 

My offer is as broad as humanity itself. 
For sickness knows no distinction in its 
ravages. And the restless patient on a 
downy couch is no more welcome than 
the wasting sufferer who frets through 
the lagging hours in a dismal hovel. 

I want no reference — no security. The 
poor have the same opportunity as the 
rich. To one and to all I say "Merely 
write and ask." I will send you an order 
on your druggist. He will give you free, 
the full dollar package. 



Inside Nerves ! 

Only one out of every 98 has perfect 
health. Of the 97 sick ones, some are 
bed-ridden, some are half sick, and some 
are only dull and listless. But most of 
the sickness comes from a common 
cause. The nerves are weak. Not the 
nerves you ordinarily think about — not the 
nerves that govern your movements and 
your thoughts. 

But the nerves that, unguided and un- 
known, night and day, keep your heart 
in motion — control your digestive appar- 
atus — regulate your liver — operate your 
kidneys. 

These are the nerves that wear out and 
break down. 

It does no good to treat the ailing or- 
gan — the irregular heart — the disordered 
liver — the rebellious stomach — the de- 
ranged kidneys. They are not to blame. 
But go back to the nerves that control 
them. There you will find the seat of the 
trouble. 

There is nothing new about this — noth- 
ing any physician would dispute. But 
it remained for Dr. Snoop to apply this 
knowledge — to put it to practical use. 
Dr. Shoop's Restorative is the result of 
a quarter century of endeavor along this 
very line. It does not dose the organ or 
deaden the pain — but it does go at once to 
the nerve — the inside nerve — the power 
nerve — and builds it up and strengthens 
it and makes it well. 



Many Ailments, One Cure 

I have called these the inside nerves for 
simplicity's sake. Their usual name is the 
"Sympathetic" nerves. Physicians call 
them by this name because each is in close 
sympathy with the others. The result is 
that when one branch is allowed to become 
impaired, the others weaken. That is why 
one kind of sickness leads to another. 
That is why cases become "complicated." 
For this delicate nerve is the most sensitive 
part of the human system. 

Does this not explain to you some of the 
uncertainties of medicine — is not a good 
reason to your mind why other kinds of 
treatment may have failed. 

Don't you see that THIS is NEW in 
medicine? That this is NOT the mere 
patchwork of a stimulant — the mere sooth- 
ing of a narcotic? Don't you see that it 
goes right to the root of the trouble and 
eradicates the cause? 

But I do not ask you to take a single 
statement of mine — I do not ask you to be- 
lieve a word I say until you have tried my 
medicine in your own home at my expense 
absolutely. Could I offer you a full dollar's 
worth free if there were any misrepresenta- 
tion? Could I let you go to your druggist 
— whom you know — and pick out any bottle 
he has on his shelves of my medicine were 
it not UNIFORMLY helpful? Could I 
AFFORD to do this if I were not reason- 
ably SURE that my medicine will help you? 



Simply Write Me 

The first free bottle may be enough to 
effect a cure — but I do not promise that. 
Nor do I fear a loss of possible profit if 
it does. For such a test will surely con- 
vince the cured one beyond doubt, or dis- 
belief, that every word I say is true. 

This offer is open to everyone, every- 
where. But you must write ME for the 
free dollar bottle order. All druggists 
do not grant the test. I will then direct 
you to one that does. He will pass it 
down to you from his stock as freely as 
though your dollar lay before him. Write 
for the order to-day. The offer may not 
remain open. I will send you the book 
you ask for beside. It is free. It will 
help you to understand your case. What 
more can I do to convince you of my in- 
terest — of my sincerity? 



For a free or- 
der for a full 
dollar bottle 
address Dr. 
Shoop, Box 
4214, Racine, 
Wis. State 
which book you 
want. 



Book 1 on Dyspepsia. 
Book 2 on the Heart. 
Book 3 on the Kidneys. 
Book 4 for Women. 
Book 5 for Men. 
Book 6 on Rheumatism. 



Mild cases, are often cured with one or 
two bottles. For sale at forty thousand 
drug stores. 



Dr. Snoop s Restorative 



lxx 



RECREATION. 



We 




For ec Disease Germ that 
Liquozone Cacn't Kill. 



On every bottle of Liquozone we of- 
fer $1,000 for a disease germ that it 
cannot kill. We do this to assure you 
that "Liquozone does kill germs. 

And it is the only way known to kill 
germs in the body without killing the 
tissues, too. Any drug that kills germs is 
a poison, and it cannot be taken inter- 
nally. Medicine is almost helpless in any 
germ disease. It is this fact which gives 
Liquozone its worth to humanity ; a 
worth so great that, after testing the pro- 
duct for two years, through physicians 
and hospitals, we paid $100,000 for the 
American rights. And we have spent 
over one million dollars, in one year, to 
buy the first bottle and give it free to 
each sick one who would try it. 

Acts Like Oxygen 

Liquozone is not made by compound- 
ing drugs, nor is there any alcohol in it. 
Its virtues are derived solely from gas — 
largely oxygen gas — by a process re- 
quiring immense apparatus and 14 
days' time. This process has, for more 
than 20 years, been the constant sub- 
ject of scientific and chemical research. 

The result is a liquid that does what 
oxygen does. It is a nerve food and 
blood food — the most helpful thing in 
the wo*"ld to you. Its effects are exhil- 
arating, vitalizing, purifying. Yet it is 
an absolutely certain germicide. The 
reason is that germs are vegetables ; 
and Liquozone — like an excess of 
oxygen — is deadly to vegetal matter. 

Liquozone goes into the stomach, into 
the bowels and into the blood, to go 
wherever the blood goes. No germ can 
escape it and none can resist it. The 
results are inevitable, for a germ disease 
must end when the germs are killed; then 
Liquozone acting as a wonderful tonic, 
quickly restores a condition of perfect 
health. Diseases which have resisted 
medicine for years yield at once to Liquo- 
zone, and it cures diseases which medi- 
cine never cures. Half the people you 
meet — wherever you are — can tell you 
of cures that were made by it. 



Germ Diseases 

These are the known germ diseases. 
All that medicine can do for these 
troubles is to help Nature overcome the 
germs, and such results are indirect and 
uncertain. Liquozone attacks the 
germs, wherever they are. And when 
the germs which cause a disease are 
destroyed, the disease must end, and 
forever. That is inevitable. 



Asthma 

Abscess — Anaemia 
Bronchitis 
Blood Poison 
Bright's Disease 
Bowel Troubles 
Coughs — Colds 
Consumption 
Colic -Croup 
Constipation 
Catarrh — Cancer 
Dysentery— Diarrhea 
Dandruff — Dropsy 
Dyspepsia 
Eczema— Erysipelas 
Fevers — Gall Stones 
Goitre— Gout 
Gonorrhea- Gleet 



Hay Fever — Influenza 
Kidney Diseases 
La Grippe 
Leucorrhea 
Liver Troubles 
Malaria — Neuralgia 
Many Heart Troubles 
Piles Pneumonia 
Pleurisy— Quinsy 
Rheumatism 
Scrofula— Syphilis 
Skin Diseases 
Stomach Troubles 
Throat Troubles 
Tuberculosis 
Tumors — Licers 
Varicocele 



Women's Diseases 
All diseases that begin with fever — all inflammation — all 
catarrh— all contagious diseases— all the results of impure or 
poisoned blood. 

In nervous debility Liquozone acts as a vitalizer, accom- 
plishing what no drugs can do. 

50c. Bottle Free 

If you need Liquozone, and have 
never tried it, please send us this coupon. 
We will then mail you an order on a 
local druggist for a full-size bottle, and 
we will pay the druggist ourselves for it. 
This is our free gift, made to convince 
you ; to show you what Liquozone is, 
and what it can do. In justice to your- 
self, please accept it to-day, for it places 
you under no obligation whatever. 

Liquozone costs 50c and $1. 



CUT OUT THIS COUPON 

for this offer may not appear again. Fill out the blanks 
and mail it to the Liquid Ozone Co., 458-464 Wabash 
Ave., Chicago. 



My disease is 

I have never tried Liquozone, but if you will supply 
me a 50c bottle free I will take it. 



M 10 



Give full address — write plainly. 



Any physician or hospital not yet using Liquozone will be 
gladly supplied for a test. 



t^Stac* 




SURREY TyPE ONE, 1905 MODEL 
16 ACTUAL HORSE POWER, $1350 

Otlaeir -models ^*5r5o,$^&50,^aooo,$30oo 




he ^Ar'O'&Ze 7ArA,eet -which i*ej*n- 
laxes the speea is immeaiaxely 
beneath the steexingf ^wheel so 
that both can be controlled -with 
one hand. Trie Timing ox -trie sparlt 



entirely a-uxoxnaxio, once xhe 



bem< 

maenmc is m motion, all is -resolved 

into plea.6xxi*e; 5ena ior The lvambler 



azme an 



d oih 



er pnn 



xed mate 



eit 



Ma.g 

THOMAS B.JEFFEBY & COMPANY 

c MaJn Office, a??cf7&c/o^KorLOsh.aJWiscorishi 
Br anches, Boston, Chica£o,l?hiladelphia/Kew 
^iork Agency, i34^kst Thirty eighth Street 
[Representatives in all other leading cities 



CHARLES FRANCIS PRESS, NEW YORK, 



All over the civilized world 

THE IMPROVED 



IS KNOWN AND WORN 

Every Pair Warranted 

The Name is 
stamped on every 
loop — 




CUSHION 
BUTTON, 



Lies flat to the leg — never 
Slips, Tears nor Unfastens 

ALWAYS EASY 




IF PRICE ALONE COUNTS 

BUY ANY BRAND OF COCOA - 

IF QUALITY COUNTS 



YOU WANT - 



PURE! DELICIOUS!! 

m^f PRICE 
and QUALITY 

OUR ONLYSTYLE W,TH,N THE REACH 



CAN 

AND 

YOUR GROCER SELLS IT. 



OF ALL. 



must be fed right or nervous 
prostration and its train of 
distress sets in, for brain and 
nerves will not last always 
unless FED. 

That's the mission of 

Grape-Nuts 

There's a reason 




EDPINAUDS 

EAU DE QUININE 
HAIR TONIC 

This elegant and refined hair tonic has for 75 years 
been the standard hair preparation in Europe, and 
since its introduction into the United States, 15 years 
ago, it has reached the enormous sale of 150,000 bot- 
tles in one month— in this country alone. 

It removes dandruff, cleanses and gives tone and 
vigor to the scalp, stops the hair from falling out, 
and makes it soft and glossy. 

If your hair is dry, brittle and falling out, if von 
suffer from dandruff, try this great French 
Tonic, that has stood the test of three-quarters of a 
century, and which is sold all over the world be- 
cause it does what is claimed for it and is absolutely 
harmless. 

Do not confuse this standard preparation with 
the chemical decoctions of mushroom growth,so 
freely offered to the American public as hair I 

CD EC To the R e a derS 
F |\ELC of RECREATION 

To demonstrate to those who are not familiar 
with the merits of ED PINAUD'S EA1 DEQl 1- 
NINRorthe exquisite quality of ED PINAl I > s 
PERFUMES AND DENTIFRICE will be sent 
on receipt of 10 cents to pay postage and packing 

1 Bottle EAU 1»K QUININE BAIB H>\l< 
1 Bottle ELIXIB DENTIFBICE 
i Tube PEBFUME 
Only one set sent to each person, address 

Ed Pinaud's American Importation Office 

1;. 1 D PINAl D Bldf., v >• 



vose 



r^¥ A 1VT/^V ^ have been established over 50 YHARS. I 
f"*^l /\I^V J^5 tl ' m °' Payments every family in in. 

* v - r ^-' stances can own a VOSE piano. We take old 1 

ments in exchange and deliver the new piuno in your home free ol ex. 
Write for catalogue D and explanations. 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 



VOLUME XXII. 
NUMBER 2 



FEBRUARY, 1905 



$1.00 A YEAR 
lOc. A COPY 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY U. C. WANNER. 

RETURNING AT EVENTIDE 

One of the Winners of Second Prize in Rf.creation's 

Ninth Annual Photo Competition. 



Vm 

o 



Pub b S y h ^U"** G. O. SHIELDS (Coquina) 



23 West 24th Street 
NEW YORK 

wmmmammmmmm 



YACHT RACING IN 1905, 



ILLUSTRATED WITH PHOTOS; 



By 

EDWARD McSWEENEY 






Haunts of 

Fisb and Game 



The finest Fishing and Hunting regions in 
Canada are reached by the lines of the 

Grand Trunk Railway System 

Including the many Districts in Northern Ontario, the Forests and Rivers 
of Quebec, the Maine Woods and the Hunting Regions of Michigan 




Handsome Book Free. — On application to any of the undersigned a handsome illustrated 
descriptive publication, dealing vvirh the many points of interest to the Sportsman, and giv- 
ing the Fish and Game Laws, entitled, «« Haunts of Fish and Game " will be mailed free. 

What YOU Can Get. — Deer, Moose, Bear, Caribou, Ducks, Partridge, etc. The fishing 
is unexcelled ; Bass, Pickerel, Maskinonge and Trout abound. 



T. H. HANLEY, 

360 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

R. BUSHBY, 

6 Burgess Block, Cortland, N. Y 



C. L. COON, 

285 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

G. W. WATSON, 

124 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



Or to — 



J. H. BURGIS, 

249 Clark St., Chicago, III. 

F. P. DWYER, 

290 Broadway, New York, N Y. 

J. QUINLAN, 

Bonaventure Station, Montreal. 

G. T. BELL, 

General Passenger and Ticket Agent, MONTREAL, CANADA. 



j. d. Mcdonald, 

Union Station, Toronto. 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1904, by G. O. Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



jSi.oo A Year. 

io Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER page 

Tom Got Close to the Mink before it saw Him . Frontispiece 

A Golfing Incident v . .S.L. E. 77 

A Salt-water Yacht in Fresh Water. Illustrated G. H. Winans 7q 

Yacht Racing in 1905. Illustrated Edward McSweeney 83 

How the Water Habit Grows. Illustrated 87 

The Bachelor's Chant. Poem T. E. B. Henry 89 

Cheap Yachting. Illustrated. W. S. Quigley 91 

A Successful Motor Canoe. Illustrated . A. D. W. Smith 95 

The Cruise of the Restless. Illustrated Warren E. Kelley 97 

At Sea in a 90-footer. Illustrated Stanley G. Bone ioi 

Canoeing in the Land of the White Pine A. S. Hawks 105 

The Amateur Trappers Charley Apopka 107 

Old-fashioned Cake. Poem Emma G. Curtis 108 

Have You? •. Clement Vose 131 

Another Warning to Florida . . . ■ M. D. Ewell, M. D. 132 

From the Game Fields 109 Forestry > / 125 

Fish and Fishing .113 p ure and Impure Foods 127 



Guns and Ammunition 115 

Natural History 118 

The League of American Sportsmen 120 

Automobile Notes 123 



Publisher's Notes 129 

Editor's Corner 133 

Amateur Photography 140 

Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post Office, Oct. 17, 1894. 



RATIONAL TREATMENT 

of 

Stomach Diseases 

Means : 

Discard Injvirio\is Dr\igs, 



use 




A Harmless, Poweif\i! 

Germicide, 

Endorsed by the Medical Profession, 

Send twenty-five cents to pay 
postage on Free Trial Bottle. 

Sold by leading- druggists. Not 
genuine without my signature: 




JLoiUuJuZld& 



F.59 Prince St., New York. 

Write for free booklet on Rational Treat- 
ment of Disease. 



111:., 













.--'__-______-_ 




Copyrighted 1904 by Colliers Weekly. 
Photographed at Liao-Yang by James W. Hare, with a 
Bausch & Lomb Lens. 
Japanese officers viewing the battle through ; 

Bausch 4 Lomb=Zeiss 

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Get our STEREO Booklet free for the asking. 

Bausch 4 Lomb Optical Co. 

New York. ROCHESTER, N. Y. Boston. Chicago. 

Also Catalog- of Photo Lenses, Microscopes, Laboratory Supplies. 



ii RECREATION. 



WHAT WE ARE DOING. 

EVERY CORPORATION as REPRESENTED by its TRUSTEES and OFFI- 
CERS SHOULD HAVE AN IDEAL, A STANDARD of WORK, A GOAL of 
ACHIEVEMENT, toward WHICH IT SHOULD CONSTANTLY STRIVE. 



Here is what the 



NEW-YORK LIFE 

ORGANIZED IN 1845 

A Purely Mutual Company having no Capital Stock, 

IS 'DOING: 



Issuing the BEST Life Insurance Contract; 

Making the Promptest and Fullest Report of its Business 
and Condition ; 

Transacting Business under the Supervision of Every 
Insurance Department of the world ; 

Securing the Best, and the best organized Agency Force ; 
Insuring as many Good Risks as possible. 

A VIGOROUS AND CONSISTENT PURSUIT OF THESE 
EFFORTS HAS GIVEN THE NEW-YORK LIFE •:: . :: 



i. The LARGEST Number of Policies of any regular 
company: 925,000; 

2. The LARGEST Amount of Insurance in Force; 
$1,925,000,000; 

3. The LARGEST* Premium and Total Income: 
$95,000,000; and, 

4. The ARGEST' holding in Government, State, County, 
City and Railroad Bonds for Policy Reserve Account, 
$290,000,000. No Bond in default of interest. No 
Investment in Stocks of any kind. No Industrial 
Securities owned. Total Assets $390,000,000. 



For Detailed Sixtieth Annual Statement, December 31 , 1904, address 

New- York Life Insurance Company, 

JOHN A. McCALL, - President, 

346 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY 



RECREATION. 




Three 

Modern, Safe <**<* Simple 

^/lutomohilej 

Type X Runabout, $900 

The quick and always-ready car 
for business and short trips. 

Type VIII. Rear Entrance Tonneau, $1400 
The car that holds and deserves a high reputation. 

Type XI. Side Entrance Tonneau, $2000 

(Illustrated above ) 

The new car. Making fast friends of all who try it 

Catalogue and dealers' name sent on request. 

THE AUTOCAR COMPANY, Ardmore, Pa. 



Member A. L. A. M. 



IV 



RECREATION. 




--AWpmyMH 



W&gSSgSBS 



o 



fv - 



$B$ 



^y* 



y'/r" 



©?' 



V ' 



^\ 



S*A V M 



i i 



¥»*£ 



B V s T W F F N 

NEW YORK AND ST. AUGUSTINE 

DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY 

Pennsylvania Railroad, New York to Washington — Southern Railway, Washington to Jacksonville — 
Florida East Coast Railway, Jacksonville to St. Augustine 

Solid Pullman Train, composed of Compartment and Drawincr-room Sleeping Cars; Dinincr, Club, Library 

and Observation Cars. Also Drawing-room and State-room Sleeping Cars New York to Aiken and Augusta. 

2 other Past Trains Daily. Pullman Drawing-room Sleeping Cars and Southern R'y Dining Cars, Highest Standard of Excellence 

New York Office, 271 and 1185 Broadway, ALEX. S. THWEATT, East. Pass. Agt. 

S. H. HARDWICK. Passenger Traffic Manager, Washington, D. C. W. H. TAYLOE, General Passenger Agent. 



RECREATION. 



V 



SPEND THE WINTER OUT OF DOORS. 



PINEHURST 



North 
Carolina 



(Founded by James W. Tufts) 




The Ideal Resort, Located in the 
Heart of the Long Leaf Pine Region 




13INEHURST is a private estate, covering a 
territory about ten miles square, located 
about 700 feet above the sea, and singularly 
favored as regards climate. This region enjoys 
an unusual percentage of bright, sunny days, 
and is absolutely free from damp or penetrating 
winds. 

For the accommodation of guests there are 



FOUR SPLENDID 

HOTELS 
FIFTY COTTAGES 



All under one management and 
ownership. Rates at hotels range 
from $2.50 per day upward. 



TWO EXCELLENT 
GOLF COURSES 



which are acknowledged to be the best in the South, 
offer ample opportunity to the golf novice and expert 
alike. The annual North and South Championship 
Tournament is held on the Pinehurst links as a regular 
fixture. 



A 35,000 ACRE 
SHOOTING PRESERVE 



has been set aside for the exclusive use of guests, and 
guides, dogs, and conveyances are always ready for a 
day's sport with the birds. 

GOLF, SHOOTING and TENNIS TOURNA- 
MENTS are held weekly for appropriate trophies. 

A fine Preparatory School under direction of A. G. 
Warren, headmaster, enables parents to bring their 
children to Pinehurst without interruption of their course 
of study. 

Pinehurst is the only Resort in America from 
which Consumptives are absolutely excluded. - 

Through Pullman Service via Seaboard Air Line or Southern Railway. Only one night out from New York, Boston and 
Cincinnati. An exquisite book with facsimiles of water-color sketches similar to the accompanying, illustrating the out- 
of-door features of Pinehurst, will be sent on application. 

Address Pinehurst General Offices 

PINEHURST, NORTH CAROLINA 

Or LEONARD TUFTS, Owner, Boston, Mass. 



VI 



RECREATION. 



RACINE BOAT MANUf ACTURING COMPANY 

= MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN ===== 




Our Turbine Motor Hunting Boat, as shown above, is 16 feet long, draws loaded only 
10 inches of water, is fitted with our 3 H. P. motor and underwater exhaust. No springs, 
no valves; no clicks — as noiseless as a Row Boat. Speed 6 miles per hour. Operation 
and satisfaction guaranteed for $275. Cheaper ones if you want them. 



m 




Our Canvas Cedar Paddling Canoe, as shown above, is 14 feet long, will carry four in 
a pinch and is built for service. A comfortable and easy paddler. Price, F. 0. B., $30 — 
no extras. 




Our Still Hunter, as shown, "11^ feet 
long, 36 inches wide, built of White Cedar, 
will carry 600 lbs., weight only 80 lbs. 
Ample room under deck for decoys. Light 
weight, light draught, very stiff, very still 
and very cheap. Price, complete with 
paddle $20, F. O. B. 



Our 15-foot Fishing Motor Boat is the 
"Limit." Has 4 foot beam, draws 12 
inches, speed 6 miles per hour, seats four to 
five, will carry 1,000 lbs. 1 H. P. motor, 
operation guaranteed. Built of Cedar, 
natural finish, brass trimmed, a good 
troller, a good guide to the fishing grounds 
and a sure returner. We have them in 
stock at our various warehouses — price $165. Money refunded if not satisfied. 

Send 10c for our 64-page catalog describing, the others, and we will tell you the ad- 
dress of our nearest showrooms. If you haven't the stamps handy drop a postal. 

Mention Recreation 
Address: RACINE BOAT MFG. CO., (Riverside) MUSKEGON, MICH. 




RECREATION. 



vn 



a 



LAKEWOOD 

The Fashionable Winter Resort of America 

REACHED ONLY BY 

NEW JERSEY CENTRAL 

Best Hotels • Golf * Polo * Outdoor Sports 



Booklet on Application to CM. Burt,. General 
Passenger Agent, 143 Liberty St., New York City. 



Do You Want a Canoe 



ONE THAT IS RIGHT EVERY WAY? 






.. . 




« HBfcaSattEd&i* 



' 



. ., - 



|"p YOTT DO TRY A RUSHTON! He can furnish you one built of all white cedar except stems 

and gunwales; one with white cedar planking and a variety of other nice woods for 
other parts; or, a White Cedar Shell, canvas covered. These canvas covered canoes are very popular, also very cheap 
— the 15 foot B Grade selling as low as $32.00, all packed for shipment. Then there are others, some as large as 21 
feet, that will carry the whole family and part of the neighbors. And there are oars, rowlocks, pockets full of nice 
metal fittings, folding centreboards, masts, spars, sails, etc., etc. My 80 page catalogue will tell you all about it, 
and it can be had for the asking. Address 

J. H. RUSHTON, 817 Water Street, Canton, N. Y. 



Vlll 



RECREATION. 




* 



^ 



^ Far-famed Miami Valley ^ 

Government statistics prove that the Miami Valley in Ohio produces 
better grain and has purer water than any other section of this country. It 
is Nature's garden. Right in the heart of this favored spot is our distill- 
ery. We have at our very door the two essentials for producing the finest 
whiskey in the world— the best grain and the purest water. Add to these 
one of the most completely equipped distilleries ever operated and an ex- 
perience of 37 years in distilling whiskey and you have a combination that 
is unequaled anywhere. That's why HAYNER WHISKEY is the best for medi- 
cinal and other uses. That's why we have nearly half a million satisfied 
customers. That's why YOU should try it. Don't forget that it goes 
direct from our own distillery to you, with all its original strength, rich- 
ness and flavor, carries a UNITED STATES REGISTERED DISTILL- 
ER'S GUARANTEE of PURITY and AGE and saves the dealers' enor- 
mous profits. Your money back if you're not satisfied. 

HAYNER 
WHISKEY 

FULL QUARTS $0.20* 




SSS SSSSSSSSSS S S S 



EXPRESS CHARGES PAID BY US. 



ft 1 1 D ft EC ED We win send you F0UR FUU ^ UABT B0TTLES of HAY * 

UUlt Ul ■ till NER ' S SEVEN-YEAR-OLD RYE for $3.20, and we will pay 

the express charges. Try it and if you don't find 
it all right and as good as you ever used or can buy from anybody else at any 
price, then send it back at our expense and your $3.20 will be returned to you by 
next mail. Just think that offer over. How could it be fairer? If you are not 
perfectly satisfied you are not out a cent. Better let us send you a trial order. 
If you don't want four quarts yourself, get a friend to join you. We ship in a. 
plain sealed case, no marks to show what's inside. Write our nearest office NOW. 

Orders for Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho . Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, 
Utah, Washington or Wyoming must be on the basis of 4 Quarts for 3m. 00 by EXPRESS 
PREPAID or 20 Quarts for $16.00 by FREIGHT PREPAID. 




ESTABLISHED 
1866. 



THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 



DISTILLERY, 
TROY, OHIO. 



Hayners 

SEVEN YEAR 0U> 



1 /-^MP^^ • HL-r 

^nayneruistilun^ 



DAYTOH, OHIO. ST LOUIS, MO. ST. PAUL, MINN. ATLANTA, GA. 



//'///■¥/; 



iBillill 





.' . 



WBtKNCH^O 




'TOM GOT CLOSE TO THE MINK BEFORE IT SAW HIM. 

76 



Volume XXII. 



RECREATION. 

FEBRUARY, J905 
0. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA , Editor and Manager 



Number 2 



A GOLFING 

S. L. 

Tom, my brother-in-law, came home 
about 5 o'clock and said : 

"How about golf to-night?" 
I got ready at once, and after a light 
lunch, we boarded a car for South 
Park, arriving at the golf grounds 
shortly before 6. It was a beautiful 
evening, rather breezy, and threaten- 
ing rain, but we did not suppose 
it was coming soon. It was to be my 
third attempt at golf, and I have still 
to acquire the stroke and the lingo. 
I got the first hole in 17, and Tom got 
it in 6. We were nearing the second 
hole, when Tom said, 

"Gee! we are going to get wet." 
I looked, and there was a big black 
cloud, coming right at us. Tom said, 
"We couldn't get half way back, 
so we would better get under a tree." 
I was afraid of lightning, but he 
said there was no lightning, and it 
' wouldn't strike a tree like that any- 
way, so as the drops commenced to 
come, we got under the tree, scarcely 
half a minute after the first sight of 
the cloud. It was amusing to watch 
•the golfers scurrying for shelter. A 
picnic party who thought they were 
secure under a big tree, suddenly 
.started to pile tables on end, to make 
a shelter for the ladies, who evidentlv 
found it too damp under the tree. The 
<rain, which commenced with big scat- 
tered drops, soon went through the 
tree we were under, as if it was a 
sieve, and we were getting nicely 
drenched, when suddenly Tom said, 
"What's that? Why, it's a mink!" 
Looking across the green, I saw a 
funny, long black animal running 
toward us. Tom dropped the golf 



77 



INCIDENT. 

E. 

sticks, all but the mid-iron, and dart- 
ed out in the rain, and then I saw the 
funniest chase it has ever been my 
fortune to witness. Tom got quite 
close to the mink before it saw him. 
Then it stopped, turned, and began 
a marvelous exhibition of dodging 
and twisting. Tom seemed possessed, 
and was more like an Indian or a 
wild animal than a civilized human 
being. He could beat the mink run- 
ning, and was always on its heels, but 
it turned and dodged so quickly, that 
he couldn't strike it. Across the green, 
and under the trees, and over the 
muddy road they went, and all the 
time I was shouting at Tom, that he 
would be fined if he killed it, but I 
don't think he would have heard a 
cannon, had it been fired then. It all 
ended by Tom's aiming a tremendous 
stroke at the poor mink, just as if it 
had been a golf ball, and he was mak- 
ing a 200 yard drive, but he didn't 
have time to stop to get position, so 
when he missed the mink, he lost his 
feet and brought up sitting in the wet 
grass. His cap flew one way and the 
golf club another, and by the time he 
had got on his feet, the mink was go- 
ing over the bank, into the river. 

All this happened, while the rain 
was coming down in sheets. Tom 
came back, under the tree, panting 
and laughing, with his clothes as wet 
as if he had tumbled into the river. 
He said, 

"I am glad I didn't hit it. What 
did I want with it anyway!" 

We laughed until the rain stopped, 
which it did in a few minutes. Then 
we played back along the course, and 
were dry long before we got through. 







AMATEUR PHCTO BY C. L. BAER. 



SCUDDING FOR THE SHORE. 
Made with a Premo Camera, Bausch & Lomb Lens. 



78 



A SALT-WATER YACHT IN FRESH WATER. 



G. H. WINANS. 



I wish everyone who buys a yacht "sight 
unseen" could be as perfectly satisfied as I 
am with my venture in the purchase of the 
Vayu. Having never owned a real down 
East boat, as destructive in its architecture 
as a Parisian gown, I was caught by a 
natty advertisement; and after negotiations 
the Vayu was delivered to me at Buffalo 
the first of July, 1903. I depended entirely 
on the representations of her owners as to 
her condition etc., and every statement 



grown and looked it ; regular Reubens, like 
nearly all the lake-sailing yachts, strong, 
but homely, honest but freckle-faced. 
Vayu, the dear little ship, is without a 
check or a spot or a misfit joint; built to 
wear a lifetime and as good today as when 
she first slid into the sea at her Boston 
home. Every line and everything about 
her, inside and outside, was what I wanted ; 
a yacht built for sea work, not for fair 
weather sailing; so I was happy. 




VMATEUR PHOTO BY GEO 



RACE ON THE ST. CLAIR RIVER. 



made was more than substantiated in 
her appearance and condition. She came 
through the canal I knew she was in Buf- 
falo, but although I made diligent inquiry 
at the canal tugboat office, no one had seen 
her. Late in the day, I found a tugboat 
captain who had seen a strange yacht be- 
hind a big lumber dock right up in town 
where I had passed numerous times look- 
ing for her. He kindly took me over and 
I shall never forget my first impression of 
my Boston beauty. She is not young, in 
fact, she is a kind of bachelor maid; but 
like many of the latter, she does not show 
her years and looks like the sweet Miss she 
really is. 

My former yachts, of which I have had 
several in the last 20 years, were home 



Her genial sailing master, whom the for- 
mer owner sent with her from Philadel- 
phia, had instructions to see that I was per- 
fectly satisfied, and he did see it. I was 
only sorry he could not go with me to Lake 
Michigan, but he had to be back in Phila- 
delphia. I parted regretfully with so com- 
petent and gentlemanly a sailor and looked 
around for a hand at Buffalo. I soon found 
2, Jack aiid Pete, of fair ability as yachts- 
men and great ability at whiskey and gin. 
Pete became a regular tank. Still, with 
good charts I was at home aboard such a 
ship, the safest in the middle of the lake. 

After putting provisions aboard and 
stretching lines and canvas a little, 2 a. m. 
July 4th found us working out of the Buf- 
falo Yacht Club basin for the West. When 



19 



8o 



RECREATION. 



well outside the harbor and with the pale 
streaks of early dawn we got a light North- 
erly wind, which gradually freshened to a 
topsail breeze. We kept near the Canada 
shore during the day, and at night, the 
wind being light, put into a little harbor 
no miles from Buffalo. There we stayed 
until 4 a. m. ; then put out again for an all 
day drift and 25 miles more were counted 
off. 

A good night's rest, an early start and the 
next night we were in Detroit river, mak- 
ing the little town of Amherst, in Canada. 
Such anchorage! The current there runs 



a fair light wind made us 3 miles in one 
day. Sunday we lay at anchor, and late 
that afternoon a captain offered to take my 
line for the price of a keg. He took the 
line and that night we were in Port Huron. 
We went over to Sanilac, Canada side, and 
anchored. From there to Lake Huron is 
about 3 miles, and the rapids run 7 miles 
an hour, so that sailing is out of the ques- 
tion unless a genial gale from the right way 
comes along. 

I could not fmd a tow and the tugs were 
all busy, over on the Port Huron side, but 
late in the day a big tug, with a wide, long 




ONE OF' THE MILLIONAIRES' YACHTS. 



fully 5 miles and we kept grinding around 
on our anchor chain all night. An early 
start and fair wind took us to Belle Isle 
for supper. I had charts of the river, as 
the 7-foot draught of Vayu made me think 
I required them, but when I saw the traffic 
through the river all I had to do was to 
look at some one of Rockefeller's 400-foot 
yachts ahead or behind to know just where 
to go. Sailing through the river is need- 
less, as a tow can easily be found. How- 
ever, I did not care to have the bitts yanked 
out of my yacht by catching on to one of 
those 15-mile fellows, and the slow ones 
were all going the wrong way; so I sailed 
along until well up in the St. Clair river, 
about to miles from Port Huron. There, 
in a narrow reach, with a 5-mile current, 



boom, came along for Georgian bay. She 
just moved when she struck the rapids and 
the boom swung our way; so awaiting our 
opportunity, with anchor short, ■ we caught 
the last log. Then we ran our line through 
the chain so we could let go when we 
wished, and were off. 

The tug did not seem to like it and kept 
whistling to us to let go, but he was a mile 
away, busy, and so were we. About 10 
p. m. the wind came up strong and fair. 
We slipped our line and were headed for 
Mackinaw. While we had been in Lake 
Erie and the river the air had been 95 to 
100 in the shade, but out in the lake the 
cool South wind was delicious. A good 
glass of 12 year old, a big charge of choice 
Havana in a briar bowl, a steamer rug 










AMATEUR PHQTO BY W H. GRAFFAM, 



WELL HEELED. 



thrown around me, the wind whistling soft- 
ly through the rigging, the little ship mak- 
ing 7 or 8 knots fair, what matters? 

Harbors in that portion of Lake Huron 
are as scarce as the proverbial hen's teeth, 
and Sand Beach. 65 miles from Port Hu- 
ron, is the first good one. It is a made 
harbor, large breakwaters enclosing a good 
anchorage, and is accessible in all weathers. 
We held a little to one side- of the regular 
steamer course, keeping about 10 miles off 
shore, as so many boats pass there it is a 
good plan to do so. The wind held steady 
and fair until about 3 a. m., when off to 
the North the banking clouds told us to 
look for a change. The heavy bank came 
up rapidly against the wind, but Vayu had 
her mainsail double reefed and her storm jib 
set before the storm came in, with a whistle 
and a bang, from dead ahead and hard to. 
It did not take much of a sailor to know 
we were in for a 25-mile thrash to wind- 
ward, in a gale, but I knew the Vayu by 
that time, and if Mackinaw, 300 miles away, 
had been the port she would have made it. 
As the gale increased and the wind-blown 
spray from the Vayu's bow wet my face, 
I could but think what a different feeling 
I should have had if under me had been one 
of those modern cigar-box constructions 
of which too many disgrace the name yacht. 
I was aboard a yacht old enough to vote, 
but sound and solid; one of Lawley & Son's 
best construction, perfect as the day she 
stretched her white wings for the first time 
and still a yacht ; a ship good for a trip 
around the globe if I should desire. Not 
so fast as a nice shore sailor's up-to-date 
mandolin toy, in a summer breeze, but one 
that can show her cards and spades in a 
sailor's wind. I watched with increasing 



delight as the long crests from the 300 miles 
of water ahead rolled under and past us 
and the dear little ship went merrily on, 
making good time, close and by, in and over 
the long rollers. 

As the gale increased the sea got easier, 
the short chop grew into long, easy waves, 
and the 40-foot Vayu could slide on a single 
one. Taking 15-mile stretches, we got into 
Sand Beach for supper, and no sooner were 
we at anchor than several visitors came 
aboard. They said the captain of the Life- 
Saving Station wondered what kind of a 
craft we had, for he had never seen a yacht 
of her size come up against such a wind 
and such a sea. There were 4 barges and 
3 sailing vessels in ; also a large steam 
yacht from Detroit, to escape the blow. For 
various reasons we had not had much din- 
ner, and the big layout for supper was well 
cleaned up. Pete was a good hand in the 
galley, as well as aloft, and if his inordi- 
nate love of whiskey could only be spoiled 
he would make a good yacht sailor. 

The next day we lay at anchor and lis- 
tened to the howl of the gale. A bright 
red sky at night betokened good weather 
and at daylight we were off. Two days and 
3 nights followed at sea, before we reached 
Mackinaw Isle, and the next day we made 
75 miles in 10 hours, to our destination. 

Vayu seemed to like the fresh water 
lakes, and I only hope her health may be 
as good here as in the salt water, where 
she has lived. Dear little ship, frozen in 
the ice away from her home and beautiful 
companions, how lonely she must be! But 
next summer I shall take her visiting over 
to Chicago and Milwaukee, where she can 
find others like herself and perhaps some 
old schoolmate from Boston, 



81 




A LIVE WILD SILVERTIP. 




WILD ELK ON A MOUNTAIN PLATEAU. 





AMATEUR PHOTOS BY N. W. FROST. 



A STAMPEDE. 

Winners of the Special Prize in Recreation's 9th Annual Photo Competition. 

83 



YACHT RACING IN 1905. 



EDWARD M SWEENEY. 



Yachtsmen, excluding those counterfeit 
sailors whose mental and nautical equipment 
for the sport does not exceed a few salty- 
phrases, a blue coat and a pair of white 
flannel trousers, hail with satisfaction the 
fact that the coming summer will bring 
forth no contest for the America's Cup. 
These costly and intermittent affairs, while 
a source of great interest to yachtsmen, 
and an extraordinary attraction to the 



conserving their international quality, will 
afford a splendid test of daring, broad and 
thorough seamanship. This event is the 
transatlantic race for a gold cup offered by 
the German Emperor, and the details of the 
contest have just been completed. 

The Emperor intended originally to offer 
the cup through the New York Yacht Club, 
and Sir Thomas Lipton, who already had 
offered a cup for a transatlantic race 







^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^k 



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AMATEUR PHOTO BY W, H. GRAFFAM 



ROUNDING THE BUOY. 

Winner of the 17th Prize in Recreation's 9th Annual Photo Competition. 



non-seafaring public, invariably strangle, for 
the season, the small boat racing of all the 
various clubs along the coast and the Sound. 

Small boat competition, in which the 
yacht owner handles his own craft and 
steers his own course, is the true yachts- 
man's delight. Of this fundamental class of 
the sport, of which the America's Cup races 
are ornate but artificial developments, there 
promises to be a plenty in the coming sea- 
son of 1905. 

For the public interest, however, one race 
has already been arranged which, besides 
eliminating the undesirable features of the 
90-footer affairs off Sandy Hook, while 



through the Atlantic Yacht Club, in recog- 
nition of that club's promotion of ocean 
racing, withdrew in favor of the Emperor 
on the condition that the race should be 
managed jointly by the New York and At- 
lantic clubs. The exclusive and somewhat 
arrogant policy of the New York Yacht 
Club would not agree to that, and now as a 
solution of the dispute the race will be man- 
aged by the Kiel Yacht Club, of Germany. 
There are no restrictions as to the rig of 
the competing vessels and there will be no 
time allowances; but to eliminate foolhardy 
mariners the conditions stipulate that each 
craft must be of at least 200 tons burden. 



83 




PHOTO BY N. L. S'EBBIINSi 



THE CHANTICLEER. 



The start will be made May 15th, from Sandy- 
Hook, and the finish will b"e off the Lizard, 
on the English coast. To guard against 
taking unnecessary risks and to ensure a 
proper regard for the safety of the men 
there is a condition that any boat losing a 



man overboard will be disqualified as a win- 
ner. It will be remembered that in the fa- 
mous transatlantic race of 1866, between 
Fleetwing, Henrietta and Vesta, 6 men were 
washed overboard from the Fleetwing and 
lost. 




AUXILIARY YAWL, 77 FEET, CACIQUE. OWNED BY F. 
32 h. p. Speedway Motor, 8 Miles an Hour. 
84 



W. PAVAMORE. 



YACHT RACING IN 1905. 



85 



The big new 3 masted schooner Atlantic, 
owned by Wilson Marshall, which won the 
Cape May and Brenton's Reef cups last 
season ; George Lauder, Jr.'s handsome 
black Endymion, which now holds the trans- 
atlantic yacht record ; Lloyd Phenix's 3 
master Intrepid ; H. W. Putnam's schooner 
Ariadne; Robert E. Tod's Thistle; Albert 
C. Bostwick's Vergemere ; and E. C. Cole- 
man's big schooner Hildegarde, are all prob- 
able starters. 

The largest and probably the only square 
rigger among the contestants will be the 
bark Apache, of which Edmund Randolph is 
the owner. Mr. Randolph had been plan- 
ning an extensive winter and spring cruise, 
and had fitted out his vessel for the purpose, 
but as soon as he heard that the dispute about 
the race had been settled and the date of 
the start arranged, he gave up his cruising 



From Gardner & Cox, who designed the 
40 footer Irondequoit, the Rochester Yacht 
Club will order a new boat, the de- 
sign for which is now practically complete. 
Herreshoff will design a potential defender 
for Frank T. Christy, and 2 other boats are 
contemplated. William Fife, Jr., who de- 
signed the first and third Shamrocks, will 
evolve a possible challenger for the Cana- 
dian yachtmen. Great interest is centered 
on another boat which the Canadians have 
ordered from Albert Mylne, who, in the 
opinion of many, is the coming British de- 
signer. He is a young man and served his 
appenticeship under the late George L. 
Watson. Thus far his creations, which in- 
clude the 50 footer Moyana, have been re- 
markably fast and successful. 

It is doubtful if there is a better de- 
signer in Canada than H. C. McLeod, who 





»wa -re «t as 



LINES OF YACHT'S AUTO-BOAT. 



plans in order to enter his vessel in the race. 
This race will be the season's chief offering 
in that growing form of yachting which 
tends so much to develop seaworthiness in 
boats and seamanship in navigators. In ad- 
dition, however, there will be the Atlantic 
Yacht Club's usual quota of ocean races, 
which ex-Commodore Tod has done so 
much to encourage ; the Brooklyn Yacht 
Club's race to Hampton Roads ; the East- 
ern Yacht Club's race from New York to 
Marblehead; and the Chicago Yacht Club's 
race from Chicago to Mackinaw, a 331 
mile fresh water event. 

The Canada's Cup race on Lake Ontario 
and the races for the Seawanhaka Cup on 
Lake St. Louis are 2 international events 
that will be fought out this summer. For 
the Canada's Cup, so sensationally won in 
1903 by the Irondequoit, under the skillful 
handling of Addison G. Hanan, there are 
plans and rumors of plans that at least 6 
boats will contend for the honor of chal- 
lenging and defending that trophy. 



is the general manager of the Bank of 
Nova Scotia. The Payne defender, Beaver, 
defeated his Minloa in 1899, but the mar- 
gin was a close one, and Mr. McLecd prob- 
ably will be asked to devote some of his 
leisure to the evolution of another boat. 

In the small classes along the Sound 
and the New England coast there promises 
to be unusual activity. Even the New 
York Yacht Club, which has done little to 
encourage racing among the mosquito 
fleet, is getting a one design class, of which 
the Sound clubs, in addition to their pres- 
ent supply, will have some new ones. 

The most active of the small boat clubs 
are those along the Massachusetts coast, 
where practically all the racing is furnished 
by boats of 30 feet and below. The record 
for last season is held by the Corinthian 
Yacht Club, of Marblehead, in whose 10 
open events there were 431 starters. As 
a rule, the boats are larger and the number 
of starters correspondingly fewer the 
farther East one goes along the Sound. 




KANAWHA. WINNER OF BENNETT CUP, 1904. 



Nevertheless, the Larchmont Yacht Club, 
probably the most popular and progressive 
yachting organization on the Sound, came 
next to the Marblehead club with n open 
events and 390 starters. Then came the 
Boston Yacht Club with 14 races and 386 
starters; the Beverly Yacht Club with 15 
races and 273 starters ; and the New 
York Yacht Club with 20 races and 232 
starters. 

The amount of yacht racing done each 
year is usually underestimated, even by 
those who keep up a connection with yacht- 
ing events. According to the records of 83 
yacht clubs between Cape Ann and Cape 
May, 291 races were held last summer and 
3-353 boats started. These figures include 
the 43 races and 744 starters from the 
clubs on Great South bay, the Hudson 
river and the Jersey coast ; a portion of the 
yachting fraternity whose doings are usu- 
ally overshadowed by the accomplishments 
of the larger and richer organizations. 

It is doubtful if steam yacht racing ever 



can obtain a hold on the yachting public, 
on account of expense and time allowance 
difficulties. Two handsome cups offered 
last year were not competed for at all, and 
H. H. Rogers' swift Kanawha, after her 
defeat of Haouli, seems, with James Gor- 
don Bennett's Lysistrata cup in her pos- 
session, to remain mistress of the field. 

Motor boat racing is sure to become 
more widespread than ever, and some 
astonishing speed records may be looked 
for from boats now building. At present 
Commodore Harrison B. Moore's Onontio, 
which established last autumn a record of 
28 136 statute miles an hour, is at the top 
of the heap. 

The races already mentioned, the Lipton 
cup races at Chicago and San Diego, and 
the races of the Gulf Coast Association, to- 
gether with the long sought uniform meas- 
urement rules for the Eastern clubs, prom- 
ise much racing activity the coming season 
and much development along the most 
healthful lines. 



"How long have you had your new girl ?" 

"Which one? I've had 4 in the last 
week." 

"Mercy ! I mean the new one you had 10 
days ago." 

"I've had 7 since then." 

"I think her name was Mary." 

"I've had 5 Marys." 

"Goodness ! This one had freckles and 
a turn-up nose." 

"Three of them had the same." 

"I give it up." 

"I've given them all up." — Cleveland 
Plain Dealer. 

86 



HOW THE WATER HABIT GROWS. 



The love of outdoor life is growing more 
rapidly in this country than it ever before 
grew anywhere. Thousands of people who 
have heretofore imagined they could not live 
without the luxuries to be found within 
brick or stone walls, and on paved streets 
are leaving their city houses every year and 
going into the woods or on the waters. 

A larger part of this outdoor movement 
is taking the aquatic form. There never was 
a time when so many boats were being 
built and sold as to-day. The size and 
character of these craft are regulated only 



ment in houses or offices, and to a lack of 
proper exercise and good air. Men and 
women who live a large portion of their 
time outdoors develop strong, vigorous con- 
stitutions, good lungs, good appetites and 
a confirmed habit of sleeping 8 hours at a 
stretch. The indications are that if this 
outdoor sentiment continues to grow the 
medical colleges will have to shut up shop 
and many of the doctors already on the 
town will have to seek other occupations. 
A strong proof of what I have said 
about the water habit is shown in the fact 



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AUTO BOAT SPEEDWAY, 22 MILES AN HOUR, 40 FEET. 
Owned by Charles L. Seabury. 



by the means of the purchasers. Million- 
aires are buying elaborate and luxurious 
steam or sail yachts, as heretofore. The 
man of moderate means is content with a 
40 or 50-foot gasoline launch, or a small 
sloop or catboat ; while the man of less 
means, the man who works for a salary, 
does his cruising in a rowboat, fitted with 
a one-horse-power engine, or even in a ca- 
noe propelled by muscular power. 

All this development of the love of out- 
of-doors is encouraging to the student of 
sociologoy, and in fact to every one inter- 
ested in the health and prosperity of the 
people. 

Many of the ailments that have kept the 
doctors busy heretofore are due to confine- 



that there are about 5 times as many boat- 
building plants in this country to-day as 
there were 10 years ago. Furthermore, 
most of them are behind their orders all 
the year around. All of them are constant- 
ly increasing their capacity and adding to 
their working forces. 

Where will this thing stop? It will 
probably not stoo at all. It will keep 
on growing as the people become more 
highly educated in the advantages of this 
form of recreation. The time is likely 
to come when Long Island sound and the 
North river will be as densely crowded with 
pleasure craft as Fifth avenue is now with 
carriages and automobiles ; but one-third of 
the earth is covered with water, and it wiU 



87 



THE NIAGARA. 



take ages for the boat builders to put 
enough of their product afloat to overcrowd 
all the waterways. 

It is only natural that the same eager- 
ness for speed should have developed among 
amphibian people as has already taken pos- 
session of those who navigate the public 
highways. The auto boat and the motor 
boat of to-day are marvels of speed ; yet 
the water lovers are not satisfied. They 
are all looking for something still faster. 
Marine engineers and master boat builders 
are lying awake nights trying to devise mo- 
tor power that will drive a boat through the 
water at a rate of 40 or even 50 miles an 
hour. 

This striving after great velocity seems 



to me unreasonable. If a man goes on the 
water simply for pleasure there is no use 
of his being in such a desperate hurry to 
get anywhere. If he is going to Chicago, 
or to Boston on business, it is only reason- 
able that he should wish to get there as 
soon as possible, get through with what he 
has to do and get back. But if he starts 
to Newport, New London, Albanv, or 
Florida on a pleasure cruise, why should 
he try to go faster than anyone else can go? 
This unseemly striving after high speed 
should be discouraged, for the owner or the 
driver of the high speed boat not only en- 
dangers the safety of his own party, but 
gets on the nerves of other people who may 
happen to come within his course. 




UNDER THE WILLOWS. 

Highly commended in Recreation's 9th Annual Photo Competition. 

88 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY GEO. HARTM7N, 



THE BACHELOR'S CHANT. 



89 



The increase in the number of boats of 
all kinds on waters near the great cities 
will have a tendency to cause those who 
like peace and quiet to seek the inland 
waters of the Middle or Southern States, 
or of Canada, just as the automobilist and 
the owner of good horses who does not 
care to run the gauntlet of Fifth avenue 
or Riverside drive seeks the less frequent- 
ed roads of Westchester, Long Island, or 
Jersey. The people of the interior will 
profit by the coming of these yachtsmen and 
launchmen. They are good livers and lib- 
eral spenders, and are always welcome 
among the people who live along the rivers 
or about the interior lakes. 

The object of making this special boat 
number of Recreation is to bring to the 
attention of the thousands of people who 
do not yet appreciate the magnitude of this 
outdoor movement, a better knowledge of 
what the boat builders are doing for the 
country. There are great numbers of peo- 
ple who live near rivers or small lakes, or 
near the seacoast, who do not realize what 



pleasure there is in navigating the water 
in a light boat propelled by the wind, or by 
gasoline, or by steam. Many people do not 
know how simple a matter it is to operate 
a small boat. They do not know how 
cheaply they can buy and maintain a vessel 
capable of carrying a dozen people comfort- 
ably. The object of this issue of Recrea- 
tion is to place before such people a good- 
ly fund of information that will be new to 
many of them. 

Recreation stands for the great out-of- 
doors. It counsels its readers at all times 
to live as much as possible in the open air. 
One way of doing this comfortably and at a 
moderate expense is to own and use a boat. 
By living a month or 2 every summer on 
the water, by doing the hard work that 
may easily be combined with such sport, 
you may secure a new lease on life. You 
can harden your muscles, build up vour ap- 
petite and secure a coat of tan that will 
be an honor to you and that may save yon 
a doctor's bill. 



THE BACHELOR'S CHANT. 



T. E. B. HENRY. 



Oh, vex me not with a song of love, 

'Tis a mad, delusive dream ; 
But sing the joys of the yacht at sea, 

Where the moon-kissed ripples gleam ; 

Of hunting field, or the rod and stream, 

Of the tent and light canoe, 
The stag hound's bay when the quarry 
springs, 

And the hunter's loud halloo. 

While echoes wake on the distant hill, 
And the blood leaps in the veins, 

As flies the turf from the spurning hoof 
Where the flying charger strains. 

Sing not to me of thy twilight bowers, 
Nor the glance of dreamy eyes, 

The face divine, nor the sylphlike form, 
Nor the love that never dies. 



Then sing a song of the mountain bold, 
Where the eagle screams on high ; 

Where crag to crag in the thunder speaks, 
When the lightnings rend the sky. 

Where she wolf prowls, and the wildcat 
screams 
, By the cave where lurks the bear ; 
Where night owl hoots to the drowsy moon, 
And the panther seeks his lair; 

Where groans the mountain with riven 
breast, 

When the Storm King laughs aloud 
And veils the brow of the snow-clad peak 

With the low'ring thunder cloud. 

Ah, these are themes that are worth a song, 

Not a lovesick, soft refrain ; 
A droning tale by idiot told, 

Of a pleasure all but pain. 



For love, at best, is a phantom sprite, 
Ever fickle, fierce, and vain ; 

While unrequited, it gnaws the heart 
With an anguish worse than pain. 






AMATEUR PHOTO BY U. C. WANNER. 



RETURN OF THE FISHERMEN. 

One of the 2d Prize Winners in Recreation's 9th Annual Photo Competition. 
Made with a Century Camera. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY U. C. WANNER. 



WHOSE FLUSH? 

One of the 2d Prize Winners in Recreation's 9th Annual Photo Competition. 

Made with a Pony Premo Camera. 

90 



CHEAP YACHTING. 



W. S. QUIGLEY. 



To the average mind yachting suggests 
abundance of leisure, an excess of wealth, 
great cargoes of wines and other beverages, 
a retinue of servants and much knowledge 
of things nautical. As a matter of fact, the 
only essential, besides a boat of moderate 
cost, is the luxury of leisure. With these 
twin necessities it is possible for anyone to 
provide himself with a floating summer 
home to be moved about at will, at a com- 
paratively small cost ; and the explorer 
does not have to dig into the mysteries of 
yachting designs, either. It may be a 
democratic gasoline launch, a stately old 
windjammer, whose lee rail is never wet 
from one season to another, or even the 
promising auxiliary, without too much bush 



no ruffling of temper, no disputes as to 
where to locate, forever free from dust, 
smells, noise, stray dogs, tramps, bad sew- 
age and from intrusion of all objectionable 
kinds, is the height of happiness. In cheap 
yachting alone is such a blessing possible, 
for in expensive yachting there is the end- 
less social function and the omnipresent 
gratuity. The cheap yacht, unlike the leop- 
ard, can change its spots by moving about 
when the joyous explorers so decide. 

I once stood on the wharf of the Pequot 
House, at New London, watching the fleet 
of the New York Yacht Club preparing to 
move off to Newport on its annual cruise 
to the Eastward. The kingly Nourmahal, 
the queenly Corsair, the princely Varuna 








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ON A COUNTRY WATER WAY. 



for crowding on canvas and just enough 
gasoline power to move around to a desired 
destination when the winds are asleep. 

An endless variety of location is afforded 
in the wanderings of a boat whose designer 
is noted for not straining after the produc- 
tion of the lightest shell. From a well 
timbered and stoutly planked craft, with 
promises of many years of useful service, 
more healthful recreation and genuine fun 
may be had in one week than from a whole 
season of that odd product of misdirected 
ingenuity, the fragile racing shell, whose 
life is one, or, at most, 2 brief racing years. 
The cost of a cruise in a comfortable boat 
need be no greater than that of board at 
the ordinary watering places. Then there 
is the advantage of going where one 
pleases, returning when one chooses and 
changing around as mood or necessity dic- 
tates. To start with a fair wind when you 
please, not knowing how far you will go, 
making harbor only when weather or ca- 
prices decide, no dressing for meals at a 
fashionable hotel, no conflict of authority, 



and all the other royal steam yachts of the 
country were there, getting their anchors 
to move onward in the majestic fleet. 
Visions of Moorish chandeliers, Turkish 
rugs, hard wood, highly polished, silken 
plush furniture, old gold passementeries, 
bevel edged mirrors, grand pianos, velour 
portieres, priceless tapestries, silver lamps, 
a regiment of valets, champagne as plenti- 
ful as water and edibles to satisfy the de- 
sires of the most exacting king, rose before 
me ; but I was not envious. Near the pier 
and apart from the aristocratic fleet was a 
broad beamed cabin catboat, her only sail 
as yellow and time stained as aged khaki. 
Clustered in the cockpit of the catboat 
was a merry party of college boys with 
their banjoes and their glee songs. They, 
too, were preparing to get under way, but 
their preparations were in marked contrast 
to the formality that attended the departure 
of the fleet of the multimillionaires. A 
man on the pier sang out to one of the 
brawny youths who was lifting the catboat's 
anchor : 



91 



92 



RECREATION. 




A STEEL MOTOR BOAT. 

"Where are you going?" 
"Blessed if I know," was the laconic re- 
ply with evidence of sublime indifference in 
the answer. 

"When are you coming back?" 
"Blessed if I know that, either." 
The catboat swung away with nothing 
but a gentle ripple of water to disturb the 
ineffable beatitude of her amateur mariners ; 
and I was envious. They had no ground 
to buy, no rent to pay, no speculation as 
to where they would sleep that night, no 
mosquitoes ; nothing but healthful exer- 
cise, wholesome fare, hardy adventure, ex- 
citement for the mind and labor for the 
muscles. I looked longingly after the cat- 
boat and then at the rich men's fleet and I 
could not help comparing the latter with 
a boat I had heard of in song: 

" 'Twas the good fast yacht, the Mermaid, that 

went sailing down the bay 
With a party predetermined to be jolly, one would 

say, 
By the demijohns and boxes, by the lemons and 

the beer, 
And the ice that went aboard her just before she 

left the pier." 



Let us glance at the yacht builders' and 
agencies' circulars and catalogues to see 
what we can get in the way of a cheap 
pleasure craft. Perhaps we do not desire 
the uncertainties of moving around in 
fickle breezes along tranquil stretches of 
water in the canvassed floating cottage 
that so many like to own every summer ; 
so we will turn our attention to a motor 
boat that is sure, barring accident, to get 
us to some desired haven alongshore 
about the time the truant waves of sunlight 
are being pursued by the shadows of the 
dying dav. Let us see. No, that is too 
costly. This one is too small. No sleep- 
ing-accommodation on this one. Ah, -here 
is one. 

"New double planked mahogany speed 
launch, 52 feet long, 6.6 feet beam ; hull 
designed by Henry J. Gielow. Engine, 30 
horse power ; built by Gas Engine and 
Power Co.; accommodation for 6; cost 
$4,500. Will sell for $1,850. Howard 
Howard, Yonkers." 

We are to have 5 in our party. That 
will mean if we buy this boat that each 
will have to pay $370. This boat is ready 
for service except that we would have to 
supply the berth linen, the rugs and cush- 
ions, the provisions, ice, fuel for the oil 
stove or alcohol for the chafing dish and a 
few other inexpensive furnishings. Each 
member of the party may furnish blankets 
or rugs from his own home. We do not, 
therefore, figure that item in the general 
average. We would want one hired man, 
to run the boat, and such a one may be 
had for about $40 a month. We could live 
well on $10 each a week. Counting the 
hired man's fare at $5 a week would figure 
out for each man : Original cost of boat, 
$370. Provisions for month, $40. Wages 
of crew, $8. Board of crew, $4. Bedding 
for crew, $2. Incidentals, $15. 

The cost to each man during the first 




A 15 MILE CLI 



CHEAP YACHTING. 



93 



month of the cruise, for the launch 
mentioned, would be $439, but the running 
expenses for each month thereafter would 
be only $67 for each member. The value 
of a launch of this size is that it. is pos- 
sible to run up to a friendly pier without 
the necessity of buying a small boat to 
take the people ashore who might wish to 
go. This launch has a draught of about 2 
feet, so it is possible for her to navigate 
in safety almost every sheltered stretch of 
water, bay or estuary, whether in the 
waters of Wisconsin or the more turbulent 
streams about the coast of Maine. It is not 
intended that this estimate cover claret 
cup, birds' nest soup and woodcock pates 
for meals and between meals, but $10 a 
man is a liberal allowance for a week of 
wholesome fare. It is surprising what 
appetites the bracing sea air engenders and 
what a thirst, and for the latter the inci- 
dental $15 a month per man is made. 

No matter what body of water is se- 
lected for the cheap yachting trip it will 
be necessary to get some extra clothing 
that would not be demanded in camp or 
during a vacation on land. An oilskin, a 
sou'wester, a heavy peajacket and rubber 
boots will be needed. There are days dur- 
ing every cruise when tarpaulins on even 
the hatches are necessary, but <the limit 
that each man will go to provide for com- 
fort will depend on his personal ideas and 
desires to spend money. Allowing $15 for 
extra clothing and $1 a man for cooking 
and eating utensils, the cost for the first 
month of such a cruise would be $455 f° r 
each member. The second month's cost 
would, however, remain at $67 for each 
man. 

It is not necessary to get so expensive or 
so fast a launch. A cabin cruising launch 
of, say, 35 feet, brand new, and finished in 
oak, cypress, cherry or birch mahogany, 
with 6 horse power, sufficient to get around 
in any kind of weather or sea, may be 
bought direct from the builders for $800. 
A boat of this type is completely eciuipped 
with all necessary fittings and furnishings, 
including cork filled cushions, covered with 
corduroy, pantasote or car plush, 3 brass 
sailing lights, a brass combination light, 
cork filled fenders, a brass tipped boat 
hook, a galvanized folding anchor, a per- 
manent roof with side curtains, a complete 
canvas cover, flagpoles and sockets, a steer- 
ing wheel, canvas awning and stanchions, 
nickel or brass rail and other necessaries 
for safety and comfort. An $800 launch of 
this type has seating capacity for about 25 
people, so that 5 persons would have no 
trouble in finding sleeping accommodations 
on board. This craft is covered from 3 feet 
from the bow to about 2}/ 2 feet from the 
stern by a cabin with ample head room, 
and hus 15 glass windows on either side. 



If the party be smaller than 5 and the 
purpose to get around from port to port, 
with no objection to spending nights at a 
farmer's house or in a hotel, it is possible 
to get an open launch almost for a song. 
One of the builders advertises a $200 out- 
fit for such a cruise. The decks of this 
craft are finished in oak, pine, cypress or 
birch, her length is 16 feet, her draught 16 
inches, and she is well finished with nickel 
or brass polished trimmings. She is 
equipped with a 2 horse power motor. She 
is not a craft for those who are afraid of 
the powers of the sun and the ravages of 
the wind, however. 

No matter what launch is bought for a 
cruise of any length consider, as in the se- 
lection of a sailing craft, safety first, com- 
fort second and speed third. Stick to that 
order of things and you can not go wrong. 
Another desirable feature in a marine gaso- 
line engine is simplicity. There are times 




AMATE R PHOTO BY J. DUNBAR. 

BEATING TO WINDWARD. 
Made with a Goerz Lens. 

when the professional member of the crew, 
if one be carried, will need a rest ; or he 
may be ill or injured midway between 
ports. Under these conditions the owners 
of the launch will thank themselves most 
fervently if they have chosen a simple, 
understandable engine and not one that has 
spasms and balky idiosyncrasies. Not to 
speak of the annoyance, it is dangerous to* 
own an engine which beomes overheated 
after being run a short time. Get a good 
water jacketed cylinder head by all means, 
to save your fingers from frequent burns, 
and get a water jacketed exhaust pipe to 
save yourself in the summing up in the 
hereafter and from "the perils of the sea." 
Above all, get an engine that will not leave 
a disagreeable odor in your wake to cause 
fii:gers to point at you with scorn or to 
make you feel as if you had taken a 
draught of gasoline with your last meal. 

A recent advertisement of a launch 31 
feet in length gave the selling price as 



94 



RECREATION. 



$1,500. The forward saloon of this boat 
is 13 feet long, providing 4 extension 
berths. On the starboard side aft of the 
main saloon is a brass lined stove locker, 
containing 2 stoves. Aft is an enclosed 
toilet with folding nickeled lavatory, closet, 
plate glass mirror, and mahogany brush, 
comb and soap racks. On the bulkhead of 
the lavatory enclosure, in the engine room, 
is a table locker, containing 4 mahogany 
folding tables nested into a small space. 
On the starboard side aft is an extension 
berth for the engineer. The sliding door 
between the engine room and the saloon 
has beveled plate glass windows, and on 
both sides of the door in the bulkhead are 
windows of French plate glass. The sa- 
l.oon is laid with Wilton velvet carpet and 
the engine floor is covered with linoleum. 
Mahogany shelf racks extend the full 
length of the saloon on both sides, and de- 
tachable brass mesh mosquito screens are 
on all the windows. 

When it comes to the selection of a sail- 
ing cruiser much more care must be exer- 
cised than in choosing a launch. It is nec- 
essary above all things to avoid excessive 
lightness Any yacht built below a scale 
of weights and sizes which would make it 
useful for cruising purposes is to be ta- 
booed. Of course, every pound saved in 
weight of hull means more ease in propul- 
sion, and consequently more speed from 
the same driving power. Speed is, how- 
ever, optional, and to reach an extravagant 
limit is merely a matter of expenditure. An 
over canvassed boat may result in foam 
halfway up to the mast and may furnish 
exhilarating sport while it lasts ; but a boat 
of that type does not guarantee the full 
pleasures, comforts and economies of the 
strongly built craft, even when the latter 
is deadened by a cargo of cabin hamper. 
The possibilities in choosing a sail-driven 
cruiser are as many as the variety in 
purses. Some may prefer the much over- 
rated yawl-rigged boat, others the cabin 
sloop, many the cabin catboat, and a few 
the schooner. The latter is preferable for 
all around work, but is more expensive to 
buy, charter or maintain than the ones of 
smaller spars. One advantage in securing 
a <H1ine boat is that it is not always nec- 
essary to buy; a time charter, including 
all furnishings, being the usual condition 
of a transfer. Launch owners, as a rule, 
prefer to sell outright. 

Any yacht agent of pretension is able to 
furnish a list of available cruising sail 
boats, in season or out. It is not advisable 
to charter when the price of a boat is mod- 
erate. A fairly well built cabin catboat 
with accommodations for 4 persons and 
ample head room may be bought for $250 
to $500. All depends on the finish, the 
condition of the sails, spars and rigging 



and the reputation of the vessel for speed. 
A small keel schooner, 31 feet on the water 
line, is advertised for sale for $500. She 
is built of oak frames and oak and pine 
planking. She is galvanized iron fastened 
and has 4 berths in the cabin. The head 
room of the latter is 5 feet 4 inches. An- 
other advertisement shows a keel sloop 25 
feet over all, with nearly 10 feet beam and 
a draught of only 4 feet. This one has 
oak frames, cedar planking and spruce 
spars. She has no staterooms, but there 
are 4 berths in the cabin. Her owner says 
that the transoms are wide, and that while 
intended for 4 persons they have accom- 
modated 6 with comfort. 

The cabin of this boat is large, and is 
paneled in mahogany and birds' eye maple. 
There are 2 large clothes lockers of hard- 
.wood in the cabin. She has a large ice 
box. The cockpit is finished in ash and 
walnut, with a cherry rail. It is claimed 
for her that she is no racer, but an able 
boat and comfortable in any weather. She 
has a water tank and pump, a refrigerator 
on the starboard side of the companionway 
and a dish locker on the port side. The 
list may be carried on to an able cutter for 
$700, a sharpie for $900, another for $400, 
and scores of centerboard sloops for about 
$350 each. If one wants to pay $1,000 for 
a sloop he may get 2 staterooms, a fore- 
castle, and berths for 5 guests. As for 
open catboats, they are to be had for $100 
each, and in some cases for the cost of the 
mast and mainsail. Who could not afford 
cheap yachting with prices like these? 

A man of family, or several friends, may 
organize into a floating community, reduc- 
ing the exnenses to a minimum and ob- 
tain on their excursions in a cheap yacht 
a grand combination of personalities- and 
ideas. Expensive railroad and steamboat 
fares are eliminated, journeys along the 
broad waters of the ever changing and at- 
tractive Sound may be made, or up the 
picturesque and placid Hudson, or even 
along, the mighty stretches of the New 
England coast. A cruise of this kind will 
be found more advantageous than camping 
on shore because the floating home can be 
so readily moved about. No country in 
the world has such an elaborate system of 
canals, incomparable lakes and numerous 
navigable streams for cruising into the in- 
terior as this of ours. 

The value of cheap yachting is that the 
bases of supplies are always handy, and 
one is not obliged to submit to the extor- 
tions and inconveniences of the average 
summer hotel. One may even take his ser- 
vant along to work and enjoy the recrea- 
tion. One need not have business con- 
stantly shoved at him as on shore, and 
with or without a skipper one's command 
is supreme. In the morning one may swim 



A SUCCESSFUL MOTOR CANOE. 



95 



alongside his own home without chill or 
languor, he may catch his own fish for 
breakfast, and in the evening, after gliding 
on through sunshine or moonlight, the 
owner of a small boat at anchor in a safe 
haven may take his pipe, spread out his 
rugs and cushions and survey with a pro- 
prietary mien the surrounding waters. 

Cheap yachting ! It is the Elysium of 
the tired business man and the invention of 
the angels. But it has its "Don'ts," too. 
Ignore a boat of superb fittings. She costs 
too much. Get an able boat and pay as 
much attention to her equipment and out- 
fit as to her design. The comfort and 
pleasure of an owner are dependent on such 
secondary features as lighting, ventilation, 
plumbing and communication. 

It is best to finish each day's run early. 
There is always danger after dark. 

It is unwise to take too many trappings 



along. Use the same rule that soldiers do 
when starting on a march. Pick what is 
needed and take no more unless it be a 
hammock for an uncomfortably warm night 
or an extra blanket for a cold one. 

Always lay in a good supply of provi- 
sions, ice and coal. Calms come like the 
proverbial thief in the night. 

Don't, above all things, select a boat in 
bad order or even a very old craft. Ex- 
amine everything in sight and have a 
builder examine everything out of sight. 

If you pick a sound boat, select con- 
genial companions and choose an interest- 
ing cruising area: you will own your float- 
ing cottage and live as cheaply as on shore, 
if not cheaper. Under such conditions the 
highest degree of pleasure and instruction 
may be attained, and every night all hands 
will rest with the tranquillity of a forgiven 
sinner. 



A SUCCESSFUL MOTOR CANOE. 



A. D. W. SMITH. 
Photos by the Author. 



Great interest has been aroused in the 
development of small motor craft, and 
while there are many classes of motor 
boats the motor canoe here described is, as 
far as T know, the only successful one in 




SHOWING SKEG, PROPELLER. ETC. 

operation. It is an ordinary stock paddling 
canoe, 18 feet long, 35 inches beam, 14 
inches deep, built by The Canadian Canoe 
Co., Peterboro. As shown in cut No. 1, a 
skeg is built on from about the center of 
the keel to the stern. Through this skeg 
the shaft runs to a point sufficiently low 
to keep the propeller submerged under all 
conditions which, as far as I can find out, 
was the main difficulty experienced by 
others 

This skeg not only answers the purpose 
mentioned, but also provides a long bear- 
ing for the shaft, and stiffens the canoe 
considerably. It is fastened through by 
bolts sufficiently long to be riveted under- 
neath to the one-inch half oval iron which 
serves as a protection to the keel, and is 



carried from the bow to the stern, at which 
point it projects as a shoe protecting the 
propeller blades from injury either while 
running or landing. The rudder is attached 
to this shoe, and steering can be controlled 
from any part of the canoe, as an endless 
cord runs through screw eyes and pulleys 
attached to the gunwales. 

Motive power is supplied by a 2-cycle, 
single cylinder one horse power gasoline 
engine, set up exactly in the center of the 
canoe. It is fastened to a bed made from 
2-foot pieces of ash, laid longitudinally, with 
2 cross pieces formed to fit the bottom of 
the canoe. These pieces also act as braces, 
and are fastened from the outside by brass 
screws. 

The propeller shaft from the engine to 




RUNNING IO MILES AN HOUR. 

the skeg is encased in brass tubing, and is 
supported by 2 bearings about 2 feet apart. 
This stationary casing also acts as a bear- 
ing where it enters the skeg, and the shaft 



9 6 



RECREATION. 



can always be kept lubricated; and not- 
withstanding the 9-foot length of the shaft 
there has been no side play. 

The gasoline tank, capacity 3 gallons, is 
in the bow under the decking, and a lead 
pipe conveys the gasoline to the carburetor. 
This works all right in smooth water, but 
where rough water is the rule I advise cyl- 
indrical tanks placed amidships. Battery 
box, spark coil, and switch, together with 
the connecting wires, are waterproof, and 
are within easy reach of the person run- 
ning the engine. The discharge pipe from 
the water jacket is run through the muf- 
fler. A tool box is used as a seat by the 
person running the engine, and while one 
person can easily operate the canoe, I found 
that while carrying 2 or 3 people, better 




MAKING A LANDING. 

speed could be obtained. Four adults can 
sit comfortably in the canoe, and average 
speed of a little over 10 miles an hour 
during the past season was obtained with 
the equipment described. 

The cost of the canoe, equipped, is about 
$180, and when fully loaded the draught is 
less than 12 inches. 

It is impossible in a short description like 
this to give details, but I am confident that 
this type is not only the ideal one for 
canoeists, but that it will also aopeal to 
prospectors, explorers and surveyors, who 
need something portable, safe, speedy, and 
strong enough to stand hard usage. As an 
illustration, in August, with fairly choppy 
water, on Lake Ontario, we carried in the 
canoe 4 adults and 2 children and towed for 




RUNNING 8 MILES AN HOUR. 

several hours an 18-foot rowboat containing 
as many more people. 

I found the canoe steady in the roughest 
weather, easily steered and dry. 

Anyone interested and wishing to build 
can get further details by writing me, and 
I can also arrange for working plans and 
specifications. 

A. E. Dunn, St. Enoch's square, Toronto, 
did the necessary woodwork. The engine 
was designed by E. J. Philip, now of Bran- 
don, Man., and the Dominion Motor & Ma- 
chine Co., Toronto, installed the engine. 
Wm. Wilkinson, one of their employees, 
successfully solved some intricate problems 
in connection with the gasoline supply, 
which on account of the limited head af- 
forded by a craft so shallow, proved diffi- 
cult. 




CANOE STATIONARY. 



"It's always dangerous to jump at con- 
clusions," said the careful man ; "you're 
liable to make yourself ridiculous, at least." 

"Yes," replied the Jersey commuter, "I 
jumped at the conclusion of a ferry boat 
once, and missed it." — Philadelphia Ledger. 



THE CRUISE OF THE RESTLESS. 



WARREN E. KELLEY. 



Lake Erie has an evil reputation. It is 
noted for violent squalls, and being the 
shallowest of the great lakes it takes only 
a short time to kick up a nasty sea, which 
tests the seagoing qualities of even the 
largest lake steamers ; but this feature 
really adds to the excitement and adven- 
ture that all amateur mariners are eager to 
encounter and overcome. 

We left Buffalo in August, in the gaso- 
line launch Restless, 30-foot hunting cabin 
boat of the whaleboat type, bound for Put- 
in bay, a snug little harbor on South Bass 
island, 250 miles from Buffalo, made fa- 
mous by Perry's victory. It was here that 
the sturdy Commodore captured the entire 
British fleet, and announced his victory in 



from the West, it is a bad lee shore, with 
no shelter. The only harbor of refuge be- 
tween Buffalo and Erie, 85 miles, is Dun- 
kirk, which is about half way. 

The North shore is sandy, with many 
sheltering points, and several good har- 
bors. The progress of a sailing yacht being 
uncertain, makes it liable to be caught in a 
bad situation on the South shore ; but with 
a launch making 8 or 9 miles an hour, the 
run between these ports can be made safely 
by keeping a careful lookout. 

The weather v/as fine when we left Dun- 
kirk early the next morning, so we did 
not stop at Erie as intended, but pushed 
through to Ashtabula. We needed no 
alarm clock to call us for an early start 



r^mme&mm^^^:" , 





iii m 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY D. W. MATTESON. 



A FRESH WATER REGATTA. 



the famous dispatch, "We have met the en- 
emy and they are ours." 

It had rained torrents until noon, and 
while there was not much wind, it was one 
of those uncertain August days when it is 
hard to tell what will happen next, but we 
shaped our course for Dunkirk, 40 miles 
up the South shore, where we arrived be- 
fore dark without incident. 

Before the advent of the small power 
boats, it was customary in cruising on Lake 
Erie to follow the North shore to Long 
Point, 63 miles, and from there to cross the 
lake to Erie, and continue up the South 
shore. Any wind-jammer will still give 
this advice, not realizing that conditions 
are entirely different with a launch. 

The South shore of Lake Erie is bold and 
rocky, for the most part, and as the storms 
swing from Southeast to Northwest by way 
of North, the strongest wind usually being 



the next morning, as night was made hid- 
eous by the loading of steamers at the coal 
docks where we tied up. They run cars up 
a high trestle, then turn the car bottom- 
side up and let the whole load drop into 
the vessel with a bang that makes sleep im- 
possible. We should have stopped at Erie, 
where they say the spirit of sleep pervades 
the whole atmosphere. 

We had forgotten an important part of 
our outfit, a small folding table, and while 
at Dunkirk we telephoned back to Buffalo 
to one of our party, who was to meet us at 
Cleveland, to bring it along. We also told 
him to have a barrel of gasoline at the dock 
in Cleveland by the time we were due there. 
When we reached Cleveland we expected 
to find Ed astride of a barrel of gasoline, 
with the table under his arm, waiting for 
us on the dock; but he got mixed on our 
instructions, and it took us the best part 



97 



9 8 



RECREATION, 



of the day to find him, away on the out- 
skirts of the town. He had evidently 
passed through the main part of the town 
without realizing that he had arrived at the 
City of the Garfield Monument that we 
hear so much about when thev take a cen- 
sus. They count all the people in the West- 
ern part of Ohio, and then stand on the via- 
duct and count them again as they pass 
back and forth. 

On previous cruises we had taken on 
gasoline at many points, and the obliging 
and prompt service of the Standard Oil 
concern has always been a marvel, but at 
the headquarters we had a great deal of 
trouble. They refused to allow the man to 
pump into the boat, and after much argu- 
ment they sent a little toy tin pump with 
a spout about a foot long. We were lying 
in a dock about 6 feet high, and. had all 
kinds of trouble before we got the tank 
filled. 

We expected to complete our outward 
voyage the next day. The wind was blow- 
ing fresh, but we decided to make a start. 
As we made the first plunge after clearing 
the breakwater, there emanated from the 
depths of the cabin a rapid fire of announce- 
ments from one of our party who styles 
himself a canal sailor. 

"The gasoline tank is slopping over, the 
water is coming in on all sides, the port 
lights leak, our grips are getting soaked ! 
Aw, what's the use !" 

Added to this was the din of kettles and 
pans slamming around, and as soon as this 
excitement subsided and we saw an oppor- 
tunity for turning, we reluctantly put back. 
We were, however, impatient to get under 
way, and decided to try it again and run 
as far as Rocky river, about 8 miles, a 
pretty harbor used as an anchorage for the 
Cleveland yacht clubs. We got a better 
slant by going out of the West gap^ of the 
breakwater, and by the time we reached 
Rocky river we were riding the seas so 
gaily, and so enjoying the sensation of 
leaping from crest to crest, that all hands 
voted to continue to Lorain. We rounded 
Avon Point close to the shore, as there is 
good water all along. The shores of that 
Point are beautiful, with manv splendid 
summer homes nestling among the trees on 
the high bluff overlooking the lake. 

The wind subsided and we passed Lorain 
and continued to Vermilion. There we 
found one of those charming old ports that 
are left entirely to the pleasure cruisers, 
dilapidated piers, a picturesque lighthouse, 
and summer girls, idly paddling up and 
down the Vermilion river, which empties 
into Lake Erie. There is no commerce at 
that port. Sand bars have filled the en- 
trance, and it is accessible only to small 
craft. 

Daylight the next morning found us stir- 



ring, as we were scheduled to reach Put-in 
bay by noon, but the fates had decreed 
otherwise. Our start was promising, but 
our finish was not far off. Sandusky bay 
sets in some distance, and we laid our 
course for Marblehead, a prominent rocky 
headland, and a picturesque spot, with 
lighthouse, life-saving station, and storm- 
signal station. It has been the scene of 
many wrecks. There we left the open wa- 
ters of Lake Erie and entered the South 
passage, leading to the intricate channels 
through the numerous islands, rocks and 
reefs at the Western end of Lake Erie. 

We passed Marblehead in high spirits, 
with' a fresh head wind and a sea that 
tossed our little craft about regardless, but 
she dug into it as if she enjoyed it as much 
as we did. We were bowling along at a 
swift rate when suddenly the engine slowed 
down and then stopped. The launch fell 
into the trough of the sea and rolled fright- 
fully, and we feared it would swamp ; but 
we shipped scarcely any water, so we began 
to look for the trouble. Gasoline was test- 
ed for water, vaporizers taken apart to look 
for dirt, wiring overhauled, batteries tested, 
spark plugs taken out, cylinder heads take i 
off and new gaskets put in ; every possible 
symptom was diagnosed over and over with 
no results. We were completely stumped 
for the first time. 

We were about 3 miles off shore and 
right abreast of the life-saving station, 
and we saw that they had launched the life 
boat and were coming to our rescue. As 
we had absolutely no means of helping our- 
selves, we considered it fortunate that our 
accident occurred in sight of Uncle Sam's 
watchful guards, who are always on the 
alert to assist the shipwrecked mariner. 
We were in no immediate danger, so we 
had the long-looked-for opportunity to try 
our drogue, which had been carried on 
many a trip and had never been wet. As a 
means of keeping the boat head-to, it was 
a dismal failure. We put it out to wind- 
ward, and it drifted back up against the 
side of the boat. 

When the life-saving crew reached us, 
they passed us a line and towed us to Kel- 
ley's island, about a mile distant, where we 
tied up to a dock, and proceeded to take the 
engine apart several times more, in a vain 
attempt to get it started. Just as we had 
given up hope of finding the trouble, one 
of the party hung over the stern, looked at 
the propeller wheel, and found one of the 
blades perfectly flat. The lock-nut had 
worked loose, and that was the cause of all 
our trouble ; but to fix it was not easy. 
There are large limestone quarries on Kel- 
ley's island, and they were loading a vessel 
at the dock. The captain rigged up a tackle 
from the mast and hauled up the stern of 
our boat with his engine, which he carried 



THE CRUISE OF THE RESTLESS. 



99 



on deck for unloading stone. We then took 
turns dangling from the end of a rope, up 
to our necks in water, trying to repair the 
damage, and finally dropped the wrench in 
the drink, just before dark, without accom- 
plishing anything. The vessel was going 
to pull out, so we dropped the boat in the 
water again, and began to do some deep 
thinking. There were several summer ho- 
tels and boarding houses near, and we de- 
cided to sleep ashore that night. We start- 
ed to find a bed, as we were tired and wet. 
We knew the hotels would refuse us ac- 
commodations if they saw the disreputable 
looking gang, so we delegated the one man 
with a necktie left to make arrangements. 
Even he got the marble face at one rather 
swell house, until he told a thrilling tale of 
shipwreck which softened their hearts. 
We had to drive across the island to get 



Our stay was cut short by the time we 
had lost, and we had much less time than 
we wanted. There was plenty to do, vis- 
iting the yachts and launches of all kinds 
from everywhere. Steamers center there 
from every direction, bringing crowds of 
excursionists every day. The kind-locked 
bay is beautiful, and an ideal headquarters, 
from which short runs can be made to the 
many islands close at hand. Good hotels, 
wine cellars, natural caves, and amusements 
of all sorts made our stay of 2 days alto- 
gether too short. 

We wired Cleveland to have gasoline at 
dock on our arrival, and weighed anchor 
early in the morning for our return trip 
over the same course. It was blowing a 
moderate gale, and we stuck our nose out 
past a sheltering point of the island. We 
decided to put her through to Marblehead, 





A RACE MEET IN 190*. 



a machinist to make a new spanner, and 
engaged several men to haul the boat out 
at a dock with an overhead trestle. After 
much pulling and hauling, we got fixed 
by noon, and started on the last stretch of 
our outward voyage. 

The Marblehead life savers had taken our 
names, value of boat, etc., to make report 
to Washington, and one of our members 
thinking reports would be published in the 
newspapers, telegraphed his wife that he 
was safe. Whether the anxiety was for 
her, or for fear she would get the news and 
he would return from his voyage like Enoch 
Arden to find her married to a handsomer 
man, we will never know. 

Put-in bay, on South Bass island, was in 
sight, 7 miles distant. There was a heavy 
beam sea running, and at times we could 
look through the port lights straight toward 
the bottom. We headed for the narrow 
passage between South Bass and Ballast is- 
land, or where we thought it ought to be 
according to the chart, and soon reached our 
destination, 5 days out from Buffalo. 



15 miles, and run in there to get the weath- 
er reports. There were vigorous protests 
from some of the members of our party 
about the foolhardiness of trifling with 
Davy Jones. Our little craft plunged along 
bravely, half buried in the smother, as the 
water at that end of Lake Erie averages 
only 25 to 30 feet, and the seas are choppy. 

We learned afterward that our friend the 
watchman at Marblehead had his eye on us 
all the way over. We landed at the life- 
saving station at Marblehead, and received 
courteous treatment from all hands at the 
station, but we regretted landing there, for 
the minute we struck the dock our gallant 
cook "ratted the shin," mutinied outright, 
and declared the railroad track was good 
enough for him ; that the skipper was a long 
eared son of a sea cook, and took a fiendish 
delight in trying to sink the ship. 

Weather reports predicted change of 
wind, which would be off shore. This oc- 
curred while we were there, and we imme- 
diately put to sea again in the open lake 
with more water under the keel. A big 



IOO 



RECREATION. 



swell was still rolling in from the East, and 
within half an hour the weather bureau had 
ordered up Southeast storm signals, un- 
known to us, of course. The wind switched 
back in the same old quarter, and gradually 
increased in force. About that time the 
captain of the life-saving station was re- 
marking to our deserter that we were 
catching it, and we were. We were then 
abreast of Sandusky, and could have made 
shelter there, but we kept right along and 
stayed out all day. Late in the afternoon, 
just before we reached Lorain, we took a 
header into an extra large comber, which 
tore off our bow light, fastened with screws 
and electric light wires to the cabin roof; 
also washed overboard our large anchor, 
and 175 feet of heavy cable. We put into 
Lorain and called it a day. When inside 
the river, the captain of a gasoline launch 
twice the size of ours wanted to know if 
we came down the lake. He had started 



out in the morning and put back, and laid 
there all day; but when we told him we had 
been outside all day he immediately started 
for Cleveland. 

The next 2 days we were dodging squalls 
and thunderstorms, and hustling from port 
to port whenever we could get a chance. 
Storm signals were up at every station, and 
we were on the anxious seat every minute. 

We caught one good day for rounding the 
peninsula at Erie, and ran 15 hours that day 
without stopping the engine a minute. This 
took us back to Dunkirk, only 40 miles 
from home. That 40 miles was made with- 
out any chance of shelter, on a threatening 
day, a heavy sea following, and a strong 
gale broke shortly after we slid in behind 
the breakwater at Buffalo, with the satis- 
faction and pleasure of having successfully 
navigated our launch on the longest open 
water cruise made up to that time by any 
of the Buffalo fleet. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY U. C. WANNfR. 



IN BAD COMPANY. 



One of the 2d Prize Winners in Recreation's 9th Annual Photo Competition. 
Made with a Pony Premo Camera. 



Mrs. Smith — I'd like to sell yon a ticket, 
sir. We're getting up a raffle for a poor 
sailor. 

Mr. Krusty — Not to mc. I shouldn't 
know what to do with a sailor if I should 
win him. — Exchange. 



AT SEA IN A 20-FOOTER. 



STANLEY G. BONE. 



The Luella was a sloop, 20 feet over all, 
with only 4 feet of head room in a tiny 
cabin. The crew consisted of Mr. Layton, 
the owner and cook; Mr. Wells, who served 
as skipper; and me, owning to the title of 
deck hand. 

By appointment we met at Weymouth, 
Mass., where the boat had been all winter, 
and went on board. We spent an hour get- 
ting our gear stowed and at 7 a. m. we got 
under way. We had first to sail up to 
Boston, to lay in provisions, get charts, a 
stove and various other necessities. The 
wind was fresh and we had to beat about 
15 miles dead to windward against a strong 
tide. It took us until 11.30, thrashing our 
way through a nasty chop, to reach the 
wharf at Boston. We spent the rest of the 
day getting our stores, etc., and looking 
around the city, to which Wells and I were 
strangers. 

The following morning we bowled mer- 
rily out to the Boston light with the wind 
right aft and with 3 reefs in. We passed 
Hull about noon, the wind still with us. 
At 3 o'clock, when we were off Minot's 
light, the wind suddenly dropped, so we 
shook out all the reefs, after which we 
sailed easily along, following the coast, and 
at 5 p. m. we ran in behind Plymouth light- 
house, where we anchored for the night. 

Then Layton showed at his best. While 
we were getting the boat snug for the night 
and stowing the sails we were cheered by 
the smell of coffee and things. After sup- 
per Wells and I caught enough flatfish for 
breakfast. Then we took the skiff and went 
ashore to fill our water bottles. We also 
interviewed the lighthouse keeper and got 
some information from him as to our pros- 
pective trip. The mosquitoes were bad, but 
as soon as we pulled off to the Luella they 
left us. 

At 5 a. m. we were under way, and 
breakfasted on fried flounder. The wind 
was light and when we were 10 miles from 
land it dropped altogether, leaving us in the 
doldrums. We stayed motionless an hour 
and then a few catspaws were seen on the 
water. Presently we were again bowling 
along with a good sailing breeze, and at 
noon we were off Cape Cod. Meanwhile 
the weather began to look threatening and 
the wind to get gusty, but as it was off 
shore the sea was calm. 

Cape Cod is not prepossessing, being 
sandy and apparently strewn with wrecks. 
On rounding the Cape we had the wind 
right ahead, so we put back into Province- 
town for the night. Meanwhile it began to 
rain and blow, right in our teeth, and it 



took us 5 hours to beat back against wind 
and tide. Each of us took a turn at the 
wheel, but Wells had the worst of it. We 
would make a leg out to sea for about 2 
miles and then in to shore again, probably 
making only ^ of a mile headway, al- 
though sailing several miles. We were 
not sorry to find ourselves in the harbor of 
Provincetown at 6 p. m., and we anchored 
in 12 feet of water. By that time the 
weather had cleared. We did our best to 
dry ourselves at the oil stove and after sup- 
per we all went ashore, returning at 10 
o'clock. 

About midnight I was awakened by feel- 
ing a weight on my chest. It was not the 
supper Layton had provided, but Layton 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY STANLEY G BONE- 

THE LUELLA. 

himself, with Wells on top of him. I 
cursed Layton fluently for crowding me, 
he passed it on to Wells, and Wells cursed 
us both for waking him, he being the top 
man. We had not reckoned on the rise 
and fall of the tide at Provincetown. 15 
feet. Crawling out on deck, I found we 
were nearly high and dry ; but the tide soon 
rose enough to put us on an even keel. 

At daylight there was a thick fog, so it 
was impossible to make an early start. 
About 7 a. m. a breeze sprang up and 
cleared off the fog. We had to beat our 
way back to the Cape, but were favored by 
tide. At 10 o'clock we passed a large 
schooner, which had stranded off the Cape. 
The day grew warmer and we were able to 
dry some of our wet clothes. With a fair 
wind and the tide we kept along the coast, 
usually about 300 yards off, passed the 



lox 



102 



RECREATION. 



Highland light, and the wireless station at 

3 p. m. We stood in close to Nausett, as 
we had thoughts of putting in there for the 
night. However, the entrance to the har- 
bor, if such it can be called, looked too 
risky, so we stood out to sea again. We 
had been warned at Provincetown that 
Nausett was a poor place to make unless 
acquainted with the coast. While off Nau- 
sett we were hailed through a megaphone 
from the life-saving station and told to look 
out for the bar that ran out about 2 miles 
from Chatham. It was then almost dark, 
and we signalled back as well as we could 
with a lantern that we understood. 

We were then about 4 miles off Chatham. 
It was a glorious night, with a full moon. 
There was a light breeze ahead, but we still 
had the assistance of the tide. As we were 
going to carry on all night, we decided to 
go on watches. I stayed at the wheel until 
12 o'clock and then Wells came on. We 
had the regular Government charts, so were 
easily able to find our way, picking up the 
various lights as they came. Still it kept 
us busy all night locating whistle buoys and 
lights as we passed them and setting a 
course for the next. We went through sev- 
eral tide rips, which are alarming in ap- 
pearance, as they look like breakers, and 
we could hear them roaring a long way off. 

I turned in at 1 a. m., and when I awoke 
the following morning we were just enter- 
ing the harbor of Hyannis, having made 
the trip from Provincetown in 24 hours. 
The distance being about 80 miles, this was 
not remarkable time, but considering the 
weather it was not bad. In the harbor we 
passed the Mayflower, a large schooner 
yacht. We anchored close into a little pier 
that ran out about 100 yards and after 
breakfast I went ashore to fill our water 
bottles and buy grub. 

We decided to stay a day in Hyannis, so ' 
we went outside the breakwater and fished, 
but it was far from exciting. Toward even- 
ing the weather grew stormy and wet. We 
put back to our former anchorage, but 
found that we were on a lea shore, with a 
nasty sea running. We put out both an- 
chors and prepared to make the best of it, 
but as it was impossible to cook, we had to 
content ourselves with a cold supper. Just 
before dark Wells went out on the bow- 
sprit to see how things were and came back 
with the news that our hawser was nearly 
chafed through with rubbing against the 
bobstay, so he tied it up with a lot of can- 
vas and small rope; not a pleasant job, as 
every now and then a large wave gave him 
a complete ducking. We took turns at 
keeping watch, but sleep was almost out of 
the question, as the boat pitched furiously. 
L. kept watch until midnight and I until 

4 a. m., when the weather cleared and we 
all got a little sleep. 



At 6 a. m. we were getting breakfast. The 
weather was still squally, but evidently on 
the mend. An old fisherman came out to 
know how we ■ had weathered, and he 
seemed surprised when we told him we had 
come from Boston and were bound for 
New York. 

We left at 7.30 a. m. and had a good reach 
to the Vineyard sound. Meanwhile the sun 
came out and again we had a chance to dry 
our clothes and blankets. At 11 o'clock we 
entered the Vineyard sound and, the tide 
still with us, we went past Woods Holl 
and Tarpaulin Cove. We had figured on 
making one of those places for the night, 
but we decided to try for Cuttyhunk. We 
had the choice of 3 passages to Buzzard's 
bay, and chose the middle one, which is the 
widest. We went through it like a shot out 
of a gun, with a fa ; r wind and tide, but as 
soon as we were in Buzzard's bay we had 
a 4-mile beat dead to windward to make 
Cuttyhunk. That we did at 6 p. m. After 
supper we went ashore in search of fresh 
provisions and water. Cuttyhunk is a quaint 
little island at the end of the Vineyard 
sound. It is almost joined to the next is- 
land by a strip of beach with just a narrow 
channel through, and along this beach are 
innumerable wrecks. Cuttyhunk is hilly and 
rocky, and apparently is not much culti- 
vated. 

I was awakened the next morning by. 
Layton, asking what we would have for 
breakfast. We had to humor Layton. We 
said politely, "Ham and eggs for a change," 
and tried to look as if we had had anything 
else on the trip. After breakfast we stood 
out to sea, intending to make Newport. 
We had a strong head wind and a nasty 
sea. After beating out as far as the Hen 
and Chickens lightship we decided we could 
not make Newport that day, so returned 
to Cuttyhunk harbor, where we spent the 
rest of the day, roaming over the island 
and picking strawberries, which abounded. 
Several other boats put into the harbor for 
shelter during the afternoon, and when we 
returned to the Luella for supper we found 
quite a fleet around us. 

We made an early start the next morn- 
ing, and although the wind was still in our 
teeth we made fair headway. When 6 
miles from Westport we suddenly felt a 
jar, as if we had struck something, and on 
going forward found that we had carried 
away our bobstay and the bowsprit had 
sprung up 6 inches from the deck. This 
meant that we had to reduce our sail and 
make for the nearest harbor, which was 
Westport, 6 miles to windward. There 
was a high sea running and the channel 
is narrow, with sunken reefs on both 
sides, over which the sea was break- 
ing heavily. Our accident, which compelled 
us to take in the headsail and reef the 



AT SEA IN A 20-FOOTER. 



!03 



mainsail, made it slow work beating up 
against wind and tide. At one time we 
were struck by a squall and had to let go 
the sheet for a minute. 

At noon we got into Westport, which is 
a tiny harbor, but thoroughly protected. We 
went alongside a wharf, to repair damages, 
piled some large rocks on the stern of the 
boat, so the bow was well out of the water, 
and found that the wire bobstay had bro- 
ken, leaving the 2 ends intact, with the 
turnbuckle. We got some stout wire and 
made it as strong as ever. We were well 
treated by some of the residents of that 
place, who helped us all they could, one 
man riding 3 miles on his wheel to get us 
some wire. As it was blowing hard and 
there was a nasty sea on, we decided to stay 
one night at Westport. I did some fishing, 
with indifferent luck, and after an early 
supper we walked along the beach to West- 
port, 3 miles away, a quaint, old fashioned 
village. The mosquitoes were bad and we 
were glad to get on board again, as they 
never troubled us much on the Luella, the 
atmosphere probably being a bit too smoky 
for them, what with an oil stove and 3 
strong pipes. 

At 5 o'clock the next morning we made 
our way out of the harbor, standing out to 
sea clear of the reefs. The wind was light, 
and although ahead was sufficiently on the 
bow to allow us to make leg for the light- 
house, which we were just able to weather 
without coming about. We passed a large 
steam fishing boat and were interested to 
see the crew fishing. A man up in the 



mast sights a shoal of fish, then the boats 
cast a net around them and the crew haul 
in. We saw about 20 of these steam fish- 
ing boats around Newport, which was then 
coming into full view. We stood over 
toward Point Judith. The wind was fresh- 
ening and a nasty sea getting up. We 
passed Narragansett Pier and at 2 p. m. were 
off Point Judith, where we caught the full 
force of both the sea and the wind. We kept 
at it 2 hours, but could make little head- 
way, catching the wind when on the top of 
a wave and when in the trough of the sea 
getting none at all ; so we went about and 
headed for Newport. We then had wind 
and tide with us and went at a great pace. 

When off Narragansett Pier we noticed a 
schooner moored behind a breakwater and 
concluded that where she could go we 
could ; so we stood in and went through a 
narrow entrance into a little harbor about 
200 feet square. Soon after we went in, 
the schooner was towed out. There were 
3 fishing boats of about our own size 
in there. We spent the rest of the day do- 
ing Narragansett Pier. The next morning 
the weather was worse and the breakers 
were dashing right across the mouth of the 
harbor, making it impossible for us to get 
out. 

As my time was up I was unable to con- 
tinue my water trip to New York, and had 
to return overland ; but I had thoroughly 
enjoyed my vacation and felt braced up to 
contend with the rest of the summer in a 
place that shall be nameless, but is only one 
degree removed from Hades. 



MUCH IN LITTLE. 



DR. C. B. ALBRIGHT. 

Never has my barque been cast 
On mighty rivers rushing fast ; 
Nor have I stood on mountain height 
Where lonely eagles rest their flight. 
I have not been upon the shore 
And heard the mighty ocean roar; 
Nor have I ever lived to see 
The desert's wide monotony. 

But well I know the inland lake, 
Where bass and trout the waters break ; 
The woodland filled with song and flowers, 
Where breezes whisper 'mongst the bowers. 
The hills, the brooks, the meadows free — 
I'm born for them — they're born for me. 



MADE IN ALASKA. 



Enclosed find photos that were made at 
2,30 a. m. July 6, 1904, just as the sun was 





ALASKA DUCKS. 



rising. Game is plentiful here ; geese by the 
thousands, with their young, and many 
other kinds of birds. They are seldom 
molested. 

I bought my Eastman Kodak from a 



ALASKA TROUT. 

dealer here and find it perfect in every 
way. 

Recreation reaches us at intervals and 
is always a welcome visitor. 

Frank R. Louden. Nome, Alaska. 



A FISH DUCK'S. BREAKFAST. 



Herewith I enclose 
a photo of a fish 
duck* and fish which 
I shot last fall. The- 
justice of the place, 
Mr. Martin, and I 
went out to shoot 
some loons on the 
river and, supposing 
we saw a loon out 
about 125 yards Mr. 
Martin naturally took 
aim at it with his 
30-30. He missed, shot 
again and missed, so 
he told me to try my 
luck. At my first 
shot the bird turned 
over. The next thing 
was to get him. I 




climbed down over 



a cliff of rocks, got a boat, and went 
after, him. To my regret I found he was a 
fish duck. Inside of the wound, which can 
be seen at the root of the duck's neck, the 
gills of a large fish were visible. I took the 
duck to shore, we pulled the fish .out of the 
wound, and found it to be a bass 12*4 inches 
long. The duck had had this black bass in- 
side of him completely out of sight and 
was swimming around as if he had not had 
anything to eat for 2 or 3 days. 

Recreation is the best magazine pub- 
lished. 

. G. L. Manor, Post Falls, Idaho. 



* Probably a merganser.. — Editor. 



There is nothing more enjoyable than an 
animated discussion of something we don't 
know anything about with somebody who 
knows less than we do. — Puck. 



io 4 



CANOEING IN THE LAND OF THE WHITE PINE. 



A. S. HAWKS. 



In this era of wonderful achievements, 
good railroading, by annihilating distances 
has opened to us in Northern Michigan a 
region comparatively unexplored. It was 
originally one of the greatest lumber dis 
tricts in the country, but when the lumber- 
men, having exhausted its wooded resources 
forsook it and pushed farther North, they 
little dreamed they left behind a land so 
rich in the abundance of natural resources 
as to astonish the uninformed. There is no 
better farming land in the world than this 
section, newly denuded as it is of its once 
magnificent pine forests, and the oppor- 
tunities there awaiting farmer, laborer, 
business man and manufacturer are unex- 
celled anywhere. Moreover, the many 
beautiful streams that cross and recross 
Northern Michigan make it a veritable para- 
dise for the sportsman and the rest seeker. 

In planning a canoe trip the first thing to 
consider is accessibility, and there is no place 
more easily reached than this. You also 
want the route to lie away from the haunts 
of men as far as possible, yet so near to 
civilization that your canoe may be carried 
by rail to your starting point ; and this com- 
bination is not to be found everywhere. 

Although Michigan's day of lumbering on 
a big scale is past and the land looker's 
job is gone, there is still some of her arbor- 
eal glory left in the form of considerable 
hard wood. It lies North of Alpena and 
from there to Mackinaw. Consequently all 
of the streams suitable for canoeing are 
used at certain times of the year for run- 
ning logs and it would be well for canoeists 
to understand that the drive is supnosed to 
be over by the middle of June. Still, they 
should be sure that the streams are in con- 
dition before they start down, for a meet- 
ing with a mile or 2 of jams might not be 
pleasant, especially if one be limited for 
time. The station agents at the towns on 
the railways which intersect the upper coun- 
ties of the State will be found willing to 
give canoeists information on this subject. 

These rivers are picturesque in the ex- 
treme and although there are portions with 
low-lying, even marshy banks, the greater 
part are banked by sandy slopes that aver- 
age at least 30 feet in height. They are all 
remarkably free from falls and rapids and 
in but a few places is it necessary to make 
a carry, or portage, and that only around 
a dam. Where man has destroyed the 
original forest, Nature has done her noblest 
to cover the defect with a second growth 
of low timbers ; the result is beautiful and 
picturesque, inviting to both artist and pho- 
tographer. 



The many winding Au Sable river, the 
one time haunt of the gamy grayling, offers 
one of the most accessible canoeing trips of 
the State. One who has but limited time 
at his disposal may there find complete re- 
laxation from business life and its cares. 
He can reach the starting point easily, and 
at the end be within reach of the railway. 
He can lazily paddle along by day, resting, 
dreaming, breathing life giving air, and by 
night sleeping with "the stars ashining over- 
head." He can catch each morning enough 
trout to supply his need for the day, mak- 
ing the pleasure of the catch all the keener 
by stopping short of satiety. Camping 
places are to be found anywhere that fancy 
may incline one to stop when night falls. 

The outfit for an ordinary camping trip 
is all that is necessary, excepting the canoe. 
This should be of cedar or any light wood 
and for a party of 2 with their outfit should 
weigh about 60 pounds. If decked over 2 
feet or so at bow and stern it will be found 
more convenient for stowing away articles. 
It can be taken by rail to Grayling in Craw- 
ford county, and there the stock of provis- 
ions can be secured. This river rambles 
along 300 miles to its outlet in Lake Huron 
at Oscoda. There train can be taken for 
home with strength in one's limbs, health 
in the body and so, of course, hope in the 
heart. 

A short drive from Rose City, Ogemaw 
county, would reach the headwaters of the 
Au Gres and Rifle rivers which offer fine 
opportunities for canoe trips and incidentally 
some good trout fishing, coming out in one 
case at Omer and in the other at Au Gres 
on Saginaw bay. This section and that of 
the Au Sable were originally the home of 
the grayling, but brook trout and rainbow 
trout have taken their place. Pigeon river 
and Black river, in the extreme North of 
Michigan, have still some grayling, but the 
fish is practically extinct. This is greatly 
to be deplored, for there was no finer sport 
than casting a fly for this p-amy fish. As 
Michigan has lost her timber the climate 
has changed and as the grayling never 
thrives in rivers subject to great changes 
in temperature the species is disappearing. 

A canoe can be taken from Ossineke, Al- 
pena county, about 12 miles over good roads 
to the outlet of Hubbard lake, thence down 
the South branch of Thunder Bay river to 
its junction with the main stream, and then 
down to Alpena. This forms a short but 
interesting trip, with a fairly straight 
course through a fine farming country and 
besides the trout fishing is excellent. 

Penetrating still farther North, the canoe- 



105 



io6 



RECREATION. 



1st reaches what is left of the lumbering 
district of Michigan, the lonely and wild 
section lying around Black and Pigeon riv- 
ers. These 2 streams offer really splendid 
opportunities for the canoeist who desires 
to get as far as possible from his ordinary 
life and dwell for a time close to Nature in 
her wildest form. One hears alluring stories 
of the big rainbows caught up these rivers 
and as they have not been fished so hard as 
the streams farther South one can well be- 
lieve that sportsmen would probably find 
in these waters plenty of exercise for their 
skill in casting a fly. The canoe can be put 
into Black river at the termination of a 
spur of the Detroit and Mackinac railway, 
which runs about 15 miles South from the 
town of Tower. Thence the way leads 
into Black lake, then down the Cheboygan 



river to Cheboygan. This trip can be 
made in 3 days if one be pressed for time 
and will amply repay for the trouble taken 
in getting there ; but a longer time should 
be allowed in order to enjoy it to the full 
extent. 

The Pigeon river and Sturgeon river 
trips can be begun by driving about 4 miles 
West from Vanderbilt, Otsego county. 
Down either of these rivers to Mullett lake 
and through this and then on to Cheboygan 
will take about 5 days and affords the ca- 
noeist and the fisherman the finest sort of 
recreation. 

On all such trips at least one member of 
the party should carry a camera, for the 
scenery is grand and many small objects 
will be found along the way, of which the 
canoeist will wish to preserve images. 



THOUGHTLESS WOMEN. 




Here is another example of the shameful 
use to which the camera is sometimes put. 
A Columbus, Ohio, paper reproduced this 
picture, accompanied by the following 
statement : 

A party has just returned from a tour of the 
lakes, and their fishing exploits equal those of 
professionals. The party consisted of the follow- 
ing Columbus ladies: Mrs. Robert Singer, Mrs. 
Conklin and daughter, Libbie; and Misses May, 
Grace and Lillian Blackmore. 

They went under the guardianship of Robert 
Singer. During their trip they spent a day at 
Islandton, Mich., and there the ladies caught 300 
fish with hook and line. They proudly show a 
photograph of themselves and the fish they caught 
as a proof. 

These women were not aware when they 
posed before the camera, with this shocking 
evidence of their slaughter, that they were 
exposing themselves to the reasonable con- 
demnation of all good people who may 
see the picture, but I trust they may never 
fish in one afternoon. 



Customer — You know that coat I bought 
of you? Well, when I buttoned it the first 
time it split down the back. 

Clothing Dealer — Indeed? It must be 
that the buttons were sewed on too strong- 
ly. — Chicago News. 



&R. AND ]\fRS. robt. singer, mrs. ainu Miss "Yes, he was killed by a blow from a 

CONKLIN, MISSES MAY, GRACE AND policeman's club." 

LILIAN BLACKMORE. 



"Sort of hard-wood finish, eh?" — Puck. 



THE AMATEUR TRAPPERS. 



CHARLEY APOPKA. 



III. 



Early the next morning the trappers 
arose, lunched, and then, putting a lot of 
otter and coon traps in the little boat, they 
followed suit with gun and rifle. At the 
first turn of the stream up rose a pair of 
mallards with a great clattering of wings. 
"Bang, bang," said the gun, in the hands 
of Uncle Snap, "Quack, quack," said the 
ducks, and U. S. murmured about some- 
thing connected with the production of 
water power. About ioo yards farther, 2 
rx>re big brown ducks arose from the lily- 
pads, and again U. S. paid them his com- 
pliments, without results, excepting that an 
old blue heron flapped up from where he 
had been fishing and flew off, squawking, 
in an insulting manner. 

"Ding yore pelt !" said U. S., eying Mose 
suspiciously. "I believe you've been play- 
ing another of your confounded jokes, and 
monkeyed with this ammunition, and us 
with no fresh meat in camp, too." 

Mose crossed himself over the heart. 

"Hope to die in a minute if I have," he 
said. "You just simply couldn't hit a flock 
of bed quilts, much less ducks on the 
wing." 

"Oh, well, 'Smart Elide',"-, said Uncle 
Snap, "take the gun, and let's see what you 
get." 

Mose relinquished the paddle to U. S., and, 
assuming an easy, graceful posture in the 
bow of the boat, with the gun in read- 
iness, scanned the horizon of sawgrass for 
ducks. In a moment, up went 2 fine ones, 
and Mose, taking a swift yet careful aim, 
let . go with the right hand barrel, then 
with the left, but the ducks flew madly on. 
U. S. laughed an irritating laugh. 

"Talk about hitting a flock of bed quilts," 
said he, "why you couldn't shoot down a 
stove pipe and hit the stove." 

"Oh, rats," said Mose, "this is nothing to 
laugh at. There is a 'hoodoo' on us. We 
have done some wicked deed, and it is a 
judgment on us to see these big fat ducks 
fly up in our faces, without being able to 
get any. The only way to remove the 
hoodoo is to do some good deed, as quickly 
as possible." 

"For goodness sake, let's get busy about 
the good deed," said U. S., "before any 
more ducks get away." 

At that moment, the agonized yelp of a 
frog, seized by a snake, sounded close at 
hand. The opportunity was theirs. The 
eyes of the A. T.'s met, and seizing the 
paddles, they drove the boat's nose into the 
grass and bushes whence had come the cry 



for help. A black snake had slipped up on 
a big lazy frog, and seized him by what 
would have been his coat tails, if he had 
been properly dressed. The frog was kick- 
ing desperately, in a hopeless effort to save 
his life, and ever and anon, principally 
anon, as "Samantha" says, his throat would 
expand, and he would give his despairing 
yell for assistance. It was only one of the 
1,000 daily tragedies of the marsh, but this 
one was nipped in the bud. A smart blow 
of the paddle caused the snake to release 
his victim and wriggle off in the grass, and 
the frog went kerchug into the water. 

"Hurrah !" yelled Mose, "the hoodoo is 
broken !" At the sound of his voice a big 
mallard flew up near, and went whist- 
ling overhead ; but U. S. grabbed the gun, 
which had been laid aside, in the excite- 
ment of the rescue, and squinting along the 
barrels till they were in line with the flee- 
ing duck, pulled both triggers, at the same 
moment giving a vicious push with his 
shoulder, "to make the shot strike harder," 
he afterward explained, and down came the 
duck in the mud. 

"I'm not a bit superstitious," said Mose, 
as they retrieved their duck, "even if I do 
like to see the new jnoon over my right 
shoulder, and a few little things like that, 
but I'll be switched if I don't believe help- 
ing that frog made us lucky." 

"Gee, ain't he fat and heavy," said U. S., 
as he picked the duck out of the edge of 
the water. 

"Holy smoke/' said Mose, "look at the 
otter sign." 

The duck had fallen within a few feet 
of a trail made by otters in crossing from 
the river to a slough, separated from it by 
a low bank a few yards wide. The mud 
was beaten down by their webbed feet, and 
they had wallowed on the grass near. A 
trap was set at the river end of the trail, 
with the chain ring on a sliding pole, and 
the spot where the trail entered the slough 
was guarded by another trap, made fast to 
a drag. Carefully obliterating their tracks, 
and completing the set by sprinkling with 
a bunch of dog fennel dipped in the river, 
the trappers continued on their way, in 
the course of the morning setting a dozen 
more, where the signs were good, as well 
af a few coon traps, which they baited with 
scraps of fish hung on sticks and convenient 
bushes. 

U. S. killed another duck, and they ar- 
rived in camp at 3 o'clock, well satisfied 
with their day's work. They had company, 
in the person of an old redheaded buzzard, 



107 



io8 



RECREATION. 



which was walking about, hunting scraps 
around the remains of the fire, and drag- 
ging his tail in the ashes. Realizing that 
"2's company, 3 is a crowd," he leaped into 
the air, and flapped away, assisted in his 
departure by a billet of wood from the 
hand of U. S., who hates a buzzard. 

Mose picked and cleaned the ducks, while 
U. S. cut wood, started the fire, etc., and 
when the sun went down behind a distant 
cypress swamp an odor was emanating from 
the bake oven that caused wrinkles around 



the noses of the amateur trappers. That 
night, as they lay around the fire, full of 
peace and contentment, and duck, they 
heard a snarling, as of animals fighting, 
up toward the head of the dead water on 
which they were camped. 

"Listen to the coons fighting," said Mose. 
"We'll go over there to-morrow and hunt 
for signs." 

Uncle Snap responded not. He was 
asleep. 



OLD-FASHIONED CAKE. 

EMMA G. CURTIS. 

We took supper at Aunt Belle's last night, I took 2 helps of damson plums for old 

on Brush Creek, Jane and me ; acquaintance sake ; 

That we struck luck in vittles there, I think But nothin' else appealed to me and warmed 

you'll all agree. me like the cake. 

Aunt never learned new-fangled ways to As -soon as I bit into it, it touched a memory 

pickle, bile and bake, spot 

And, actin' on a little hint, she made old- And called up scenes of boyhood days that 

fashioned cake. I had quite forgot. 

She made the good, substantial kind they It took me back into the woods I played in 

measure by the pound, years ago, 

With a hole right through the middle and When haws were ripe and hazel nuts were 

scallops all around. . drying sure but slow ; 

She turned it bottom upward on a plate, I even saw the sugar camp, and heard the 

and there it stood sap's faint drip, 

As brown as home-cured bacon is ; I tell And felt the wax, all warm and soft, against 

you it looked good ! my slobbery lip. 

Then while the cake was coolin' and 'taters A settin' at the table I could look out on 

gettin' done, the snow 

She fixed up ham and ' eggs and tea that And see a drama actin' there, made up of 

smelled just number one. long ago; 

I saw her at the big, blue crock she keeps See Pa and Ma and Uncle Eb and jolly 

peach butter in, Grandpa Grey, * 

And time that meal was ready I was And Jane, a little dumplin' gal, not half a 

hungrier than sin. jump away. 

I've sat at banquets lots of times; but, high- 

falutin' fare, 
With Aunt Belle's old-fashioned meals in 

my mind don't compare ; 
Wishy-washy salads, junket and lady finger 

cake 
May do for some, but I like good old roast 

and bile and bake. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



The man who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a real sportsman. 



A KID, A CUR AND A BEAR. 

In 1884 I was employed as a horse 
wrangler on a cattle ranch in the Shoshone 
Indian reservation, Wyoming. I was a 
mere kid, and a tenderfoot at that, though 
born on the frontier. 

It was, I think, in November; anyway, it 
was late in the season for bear to be out of 
winter quarters. One day I was hunting 
deer in the bad lands between Crow creek 
and the North fork of Big Wind river. I 
shot at and missed several deer, and, be- 
coming discouraged, set out for home in the 
middle of the afternoon. On the way I ran 
across the most forlorn and abjectly 
wretched specimen of an Indian dog it has 
ever been my misfortune to meet. The 
loneliness of the place and the whining ap- 
peals of the dog, evidently nearly starved, 
induced me to make friends with the poor 
creature. When I had cemented friendship 
by an equitable division ,of what remained 
of my lunch, the dog followed me to the 
ranch. 

The boys were all away, and I began pre- 
paring supper. While thus engaged I was 
startled by unearthly yowls from the Indian 
cur, which had been nosing about the out- 
buildings. It bolted into the house and 
under my bunk, whining and slavering with 
mortal terror. I stepped out of the house 
and looked around the open country and 
along the timber bordering the river. 
Seeing nothing alarming I concluded my 
canine friend was mad, and determined to 
get him out of the house and put a bullet 
through him before a worse thing hap- 
pened. 

When I returned to the house the cur 
was curled up in an empty trunk, trembling 
violently and emitting those frenzied yelps, 
snarls and whines of which only an Indian 
dog is capable. Slipping a cover over the 
trunk I dragged it out of doors, and, think- 
ing the dog secure, went back for my gun. 
As I again emerged from the house the dog 
escaped from the trunk, ran between my 
legs, nearly upsetting me, and took refuge 
beneath the bed. That I was a little 
alarmed I admit, but getting a long stick I 
proceeded to poke the cur out from under 
the bunk. I finally got a purchase on him, 
levered him to the door and shoved him 
out. He ran toward the river and I fol- 
lowed, waving the stick. When near the 
timber the dog stopped short ; then with a 
howl he bolted for the open, his tail be- 
tween his legs. Looking in the opposite 
direction I saw an object in the underbrush 
which I took to be a large black hog. It is 
true I had never seen a dozen hogs in my 



life and that the hog was, and still is, a 
mighty rare animal on the cattle ranges. 

Nevertheless, I did not doubt it was a 
hog, and started toward it, stick in hand. 
When within 40 steps of the beast I dis- 
covered it was a big black bear pulling 
down bull brush to get at the frozen berries. 
It did not take me long to decide that I 
needed a gun. I ran to the house, got it, 
and, from behind the wood pile, fired at the 
bear as it was making off. 

I heard a roar and, believing I had hit 
the animal, I ran in closer, firing as I ad- 
vanced. I finally got within 15 feet of the 
beast and saw that both forelegs had been 
badly smashed by my bullets. At that point 
the bear raised on his hind legs. I don't 
think he came toward me, but I know he 
roared and that I snapped the gun at him. 
It did not go off, but I did, and if ever a 
frightened kid made far apart tracks it 
was I. 

I grasped another rifle from the pegs and, 
mustering up courage, went out again. 
The bear had gone, but I followed his trail 
into a dry creek bed and through the bull 
brush. Ther,e I lost the sign and gave up 
the chase. 

When I got back to the house one of the 
boys had returned. I told him my troubles 
and he volunteered to go with me and see 
what we could find. He took a shot gun 
and I my rifle. By blood stains on the 
rocks we followed my bear some distance. 
Suddenly the old fellow came out of the 
brush, advancing on his hind legs. I saw 
my friend pull up the shot gun, and I yelled, 
"Don't shoot, Andy, you'll spoil the hide !" 
A moment later I bagged my game ; but 
never afterward did I see the Indian dog to 
which I was indebted for my first bear. 

W. L. Simpson. 



TWO DAYS IN THE OLYMPICS. 

One cool, bright summer morning a friend 
and I shouldered our packs and started for 
Lake Crescent, in the Olympic mountains. 
It is 18 miles from Port Angeles, over a 
rough road. Crossing the beautiful Elwah 
as it roars down its deep canyon, we passed 
through dense forests of fir, cedar and 
hemlock, seeing occasionally the cabin of a 
homesteader or a prospector. When we 
reached the summit we had a splendid view 
of Lake Sutherland and the snow-capped 
Olympics. There we had lunch and re- 
sumed our way to Lake Crescent, only 4 
miles distant, all down hill. The lake is 9 
miles long and 40 rods to 3 miles wide. It 
is surrounded by high mountains, and the 



109 



no 



RECREATION. 



water is so clear that the bottom can be 
plainly seen where the water is 20 feet deep. 

After making camp, we rowed out on 
the lake just as the sun set behind the 
mountains, and an hour's trolling resulted 
in a dozen trout. These made us a delicious 
supper. Then we rolled ourselves in our 
blankets and the rippling waves on the 
jeach lulled us to sleep. 

The next morning, after breakfast, I 
climbed one of the highest peaks near, and 
after a rough scramble considered myself 
well rewarded by the view. Northward I 
looked out over the blue water of the straits 
and the forest-clad mountains of Vancou- 
ver island, with the snow-capped head of 
Mt. Baker towering far above everything 
in the distance. Southward the crests of 
the Olympics were reflected in Lake 
Crescent at, their feet, the mountains ex- 
tending Southward, range after range, un- 
til the farthest peaks were hazy in the dis- 
tance. 

After another scramble over fallen timber 
and through dense underbrush, during which 
I saw many fresh elk tracks, I reached 
camp again, and found that my pard had 
secured another dozen trout for our dinner. 

Fishing with fair success, we repeated the 
program of the night before by turning 
in early. The next morning we rolled out 
early and soon caught 18 trout, all we 
wanted to carry home. These we packed in 
moss, which kept them fresh until we 
reached home, a little before sundown, tired 
but happy. 

Game as well as fish is still plentiful in 
the Olympics, as the mountains are so rough 
that few tenderfeet can penetrate far into 
their fastnesses and the game hog is too 
lazy to do so. Any true sportsman who 
wishes to add a good elk head to his col- 
lection and is not afraid to do 'plenty of 
tramping, can do no better than try the 
Olympics, to which Port Angeles is the 
best gateway. 

M. S. Brown, Port Angeles, Wash.. 



THREE DEER IN 2 DAYS. 

Three of us left Pointe Au Chene sta- 
tion on the C. P. railroad, in September, 
for our hunting grounds. 

After riding about 12 miles on a rough 
mountain road, we arrived at Lake Com- 
mondow. The rest of the day was spent 
in making camp. 

In the evening I crossed the lake to the 
mouth of a creek and killed a black duck, 
which made a good supper for all of us. 

The second day after our arrival I killed 
a small deer. 

The next day I was left alone, as Evan 
and Dan had to go out and look after their 



farm work. I then set some traps for coons 
and succeeded in catching 2. 

The next morning, after breakfast, I 
started to visit my traps and was only 
50 yards from camp, when I heard hounds 
on the other side of the lake, and soon saw 
a deer come down the mountain and plunge 
into the lake. I ran to my canoe and after 
a lively chase overtook and killed the deer, 
which proved to be a fat doe. I had just 
started to dress her when I heard the dogs 
again, and to my surprise another deer, a 
buck this time, came down the same run- 
way and into the lake. I met him and soon 
had him hanging up beside the doe. 

That afternoon Evan and Dan came in 
and I decided to pull camp next day, for I 
had my lawful number of deer. In the 
afternoon I went to a clearing about a mile 
from camp, to lay for a fox which we had 
seen several times. I had watched per- 
haps half an hour, when I saw Reynard 
come in at the other end of the clearing. 
After a while he came within range, the 
old 44 found his shoulder, and his skin was 
mine. 

Next day we returned to the Pointe, 
where I put .in a few days shooting ducks 
and grouse. That part of Canada is an 
ideal place for sportsmen. The people are 
the most accommodating I have ever met, 
and I hope to go back there again. 

George H. Bent, East Providence, R. I. 

Don't you know it is unsportsmanlike and 
unmanly to kill a deer in the water? This 
cold blooded murder is prohibited by law in 
several States and should be everywhere. — 
Editor. 



A WYOMING ANTELOPE HUNT. 

In September, 1890, when I was 16 years 
old, my father and I were camped on Sheep 
creek in Albany county, Wyoming. 

September 12th being my birthday, I de- 
termined to celebrate it by having an an- 
telope hunt. Accordingly I arose early and 
set out. I had but 8 cartridges for my 
40-60 repeater. Following the creek 2 miles 
North, I discovered a small bunch of an- 
telope grazing in a valley. They looked so 
big and so close together that I thought 
a bullet could not get by without hitting 
one, but when I fired, the whole bunch ran. 
I fired 2 more shots in quick succession and 
then watched the animals until they stopped 
on a hill a mile away. 

By following a ravine I got within 500 
yards of them and then gained another 20O 
yards by crawling on my hands and knees. 
Then I wriggled like a snake through the 
scant grass and not so scant cactus until I 
got within 150 yards of the animals, which 
by that time were lying down. Not being 
able to see a buck and not daring to change 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



in 



my position, I picked out a doe and fired, 
killing her on the spot. After bleeding and 
cleaning her I started for camp. 

Presently I saw 2 big bucks run into a 
hollow that led back toward, the hills. I 
ran to where they had disappeared and, 
looking up, saw one standing on top of a 
steep hill. I took quick aim and fired. Off 
he went. When I reached the top of the 
hill I saw my buck about 250 yards away. 
I fired twice without bringing him down. I 
had but one cartridge left and the buck had 
left, too. Still I followed as carefully as 
possible, but not very hopefully. I finally 
saw him standing with his head down, evi- 
dently wounded, about 200 yards away. 
With a careful aim I sent my last bullet 
after him, holding just over his back. He 
seemed to break in 2 when the bullet struck 
him and went down in a heap. When I 
got to him, however, he was far from dead, 
and I dispatched him with my knife. I 
cleaned him and, returning to camp forthe 
horses, got both antelope in by dinner time. 
Ernest A. Johnson, Morris, 111. 



SCALPED BY A SILVERTIP. 

I left Old Faithful inn at 7 a. m. to-day, 
and arrived at the Yellowstone Lake hotel 
at 3.15 p. m. There was great excitement 
here. Two of the men connected with the 
hotel were walking in the woods about half 
a mile back of the hotel. Being tired, they 
were about to sit down, when they came 
on 2 silvertips. One of the bears ran away, 
but the other attacked the men, knocking 
one man down. His friend hit the bear 
with a club and was in turn promptly 
knocked down with a swipe which laid his 
scalp open 6 inches, over his left ear. The 
bear also bit through the man's left arm 
and walked on him. Evidently thinking 
the man dead, the bear left him for the 
man first attacked, who was by that time 
up a tree. This gave the more severely in- 
jured man a chance to climb a tree and 
save his life. 

A doctor from Brooklyn, assisted by the 
barber, sewed up the wound with a cambric 
needle and a fishing leader. I assisted by 
getting solutions, stimulants, etc. The man 
who has only severe scratches and bruises 
is nearly scared to death, while the other, 
who is in really a serious condition, is as 
brave as they make them. "■ 

At 5 p. m. I saw 5 black and brown 
bears, and at 7 p. m. 5 silvertips, on the 
garbage heap where they are fed; but ex- 
cuse me from wandering far in the woods 
alone. I have never been afraid of any- 
thing, alive or dead, but I should not like 
to meet the old 900 pound silvertip I saw 
this evening. 

Dr. J. S. Emans, Yellowstone Park. 



A PERSEVERING WARDEN. 

November 21, 1904, I arrested Howard 
Miller and George Shraner, 2 hunters 
from Baltimore, Md., for hunting in our 
State without a license. I went to their 
camp from Reedsville, driving nearly all 
one night in order to get there before day- 
light. There were 17 men in the camp. 
I told them who I was and my business, 
and asked them to point out to me the 2 
men I was seeking. I had their names, 
but did not know them by sight. The hunt- 
ers refused to identify the 2, so I put the 
whole 17 under arrest. When they saw 
that I meant business, they pointed out to 
me the 2 men I wanted. I held them each 
for 2 days this year and one day for 
last year and fined them each $75 and costs, 
making in all $173.14. 

These 2 men hold good positions in 
Baltimore, on the railroad, still they were 
not gentlemen enough to take out the re- 
quired license which in our State is only 
$10, considerably less than the $173.14 
they eventually paid. 

After they got out of our State last year, 
they bragged of having got away from 
me, but this year the laugh is on them. 
Joseph Berrier, Game Protector, 
Harrisburg, Penn. 

You're a good boy, Joe, and I hope the 
neighbors of Miller and Shraner will see 
that they are properly ostracized by the 
decent people of Baltimore.— Editor. 



GAME NOTES. 

The Scugog is filling with wild rice, but 
I believe it is the government's intention 
to dredge part of it. There were an un- 
usual number of black ducks last summer. 

We ought to have in every Province and 
Territory in Canada and every State and 
Territory in the Union a law to prohibit 
the sale of game and birds. If such a law 
were strictly enforced, it would do more 
to stop the decrease of our game and game 
birds than stopping the sale of the auto- 
matic gun. We want both stopped, how- 
ever, for they are the 2 greatest causes of 
decrease. The automatic is at present only 
begun, but now is the time to stop its 
manufacture. 

The winter of 1903-4 proved hard on the 
deer up North. Guides tell me a great num- 
ber were either frozen, starved or killed by 
wolves. " 

S. E. Sangster, Port Perry, Ont. 



Some Keene, N. H., game butchers re- 
cently held a side hunt. One end of the 
crowd was headed by "Doctor" W. C. 
Mathews and the other by C. H. Slade. I 
wonder what Mathews is "Doctor" of? It 
would seem from the love of slaughter he 



112 



RECREATION. 



has manifested by going into this kind of 
a match that he would never try to save 
the life of anything, man or beast. If he is 
a doctor of medicine, it would be well for 
sick people to leave him out. 

These hunters are said to have killed a 
large number of hedgehogs. Brave hunt- 
ers ! You can kill a hedgehog with a club ; 
and that creatures calling themselves men 
should go out and murder these innocent, 
useful, stupid, little beasts with guns, in a 
side hunt, is almost beyond comprehension. 

The only pleasant feature /of the report 
is that these 2-legged skunks killed a num- 
ber of the 4-legged kind. 



I have read my story in December Re- 
creation, and frankly admit I did wrong 
in being such a hog, and killing so many 
squirrels; but at that time I did not realize 
what I was doing. I will never kill more 
than I really want. I thoroughly appre- 
ciate the way you roast the game hogs, and 
trust you may continue to do so for the 
sake of those who are not so greedy. 

J. S. Johnston, Jr. 



Deputy Game Warden R. M. Wark, of 
Harrison, Idaho, arrested I. N. Coplen and 
Wm. Pratt in their camp on the St. Joe 
river for killing deer out of season. He 
took them before Justice Frost, of Harri- 
son, who promptly gave them a case of 
cold feet. He fined Coplen and Pratt $100 
each and costs, and it will probably be a 
cold day when they go before Justice Frost 
again. 



Hunting licenses were issued early in the 
season to W. H. Brewin, J. E. Haines, C. 
H. Standard, D. Eldridge, L. R. McCoy, J. 
D. Barnes. H. R. Fisher, A. Burhans, F O. 
Gilmore, M. Vielehi, Floyd Straley> M. L. 
Pollitt, Frank Lockwood, Samuel Haines, 
O. Ague, F. Sollenberger, Charles Luker, 
George Gladwell. 

M. K, Canton, 111. 



October ist guns resounded all day from 
the woods about West Brookfield. Sports- 
men who had been longing for the day 
made an early start for favorite hunting 
grounds. Dr. Clement E. Bill and party 
drove to game grounds in adjoining towns. 
William D. Foster returned with a well 
filled bag. 

G. W., Worcester, Mass. 



Altoona sportsmen had great luck with 
turkeys last October. Harry Bartley, R. H. 
Metz and J. A. Lafferty each killed a large 
bird ; George Coon, Fred Hill and Harry 
L. Stewart got 2 apiece. 

C. S. H., Altoona, Pa. 



enjoyed a successful hunting trip last fall, 
returning with a large -number of coons, 
squirrels and grouse. 

R. M., Altoona, Pa. 



Sheriff Costigan, James Cunningham and 
George Fowler hunted the Cheyenne bot- 
toms near Hoisington, securing a large 
number of ducks. 

A. W. S, Ottawa, Kan. 



C. L. Bent does not have to go hunting 
for birds. He bagged 4 black ducks from 
his office window one day last October. 

B. C. B., Gardner, Mass. 



I should like to hear from any of your 
readers who -have taken a course in the 
Northwestern School of Taxidermy. 

A. J. Perrine, Indianola, la. 



Charles D. Case spent part of October 

hunting at Chateaugay lake. He brought 
home a doe weighing 186 pounds. 

S. W. C, Fort Edward, N. Y. 



James McFeely is one of our lucky 
sportsmen. He made a number of excep- 
tionally good bags last season. 

E. R. D., Altoona, Pa. 



Charles A. Mason and John Nesbit spent 
2 weeks deer hunting in the vicinity of 
Elmsville, N. B., last October. 

A. S., Cambridge, Mass. 



Walter C. Coons and Albert Peters are 
the champion opossum hunters of Haverhill. 
They bagged 7 in one night. 

W. H. R., Ironton, Ohio. 



The best coyote hunting is in Nevada, 
along the C. P. R. R., about Kelton, and 
West of Salt Lake. 

F. D. Shepherd, Salt Lake, Utah. 



Councilman Wm. E. Donmoyer killed a 
number of wild ducks at Stover's Dam, 
North Lebanon. 

C. J. H., Lebanon, Pa. 



Fred Crowell had a few days' success- 
ful hunting on the Cape early in the 
season. R. F., Bro^'ion, Mass. 

R. F. Warren, of Friendsville, Pa., got 4 
wild turkeys in 2 days' hunting last season. 
B. M. B., Chambersburg, Pa. 



Carl S. Taylor and H. M. Smith were 
among our luckiest hunters last season. 
K. C. C, Altoona, Pa. 



William Hetrick, of 1520 Third avenue, 



Mr. G. Leland spent 10 days last fall 
hunting in the Schroon lake region. 

G. B. H., Glens Falls, N. Y. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



SOME CATCHES AT AVALON. 

Fishing all along the. coast of Southern 
California and at Avalon, Catalina Island, 
is at its best in July. Mackerel, silver sea 
trout, surf fish and halibut ran well last 
season at Santa Monica, Redondo, Playa, 
Del Rey and all the beach resorts South of 
Los Angeles. By trolling off shore large 
numbers of barracuds and yellowtails were 
taken. At Avalon many large black sea 
bass, or jewfish, were brought to gaff. 

July 2nd Mr. Claude W. Heineman, of 
New York, took a black sea bass weighing 
350 pounds after a hard fight, lasting over 
3 hours. July 3rd Mr. Ben L. Brundage, 
of Bakersfield, Cal., broke the season's 
record by bringing in a black sea bass 
which weighed 357 pounds. Mr. Brundage 
brought his huge fish to gaff in 34 minutes. 

Yellowtail and white sea bass also ran 
well. Many of the "white sea bass weigh 
30 to 60 pounds and afford excellent sport. 
Albicore and rock bass were brought in by 
the hundreds every day. July 3rd Mr. and 
Mrs. W. S. Brown, of England, who were 
stopping at Avalon, brought in no rock 
bass, 3 albicore and 2 yellowtails, the en- 
tire catch weighing 620 pounds. Another 
man, name unknown, brought in a catch 
weighing 700 pounds. 

Some regulation should be adopted at 
Avalon to stop this slaughter of fish by 
people who never know when they have 
enough. 

Mr. H. E. Smith, of New York, recently 
took a black sea bass weighing 210 pounds, 
wnich he brought to gaff in 9 minutes. It 
is estimated that there were 8,000 people at 
Avalon July 4th, and probably 5,000 to 
6,000 there during the remainder of the sea- 
son, so the fish suffered. 

The tuna gave Catalina the go-by again 
last season. Only small ones were taken 
early in the season, on hand lines. May is 
generally the best month for the tuna. 

The jewfish record was broken July 9th 
by Mr. H. E. Smith, of New York. His 
fish was taken near Avalon and weighed 
402 pounds. It measured 6 feet 10 inches 
from tip to tip, and 5 feet 9 inches around 
the body. 
_ July 8th a large school of tuna were 
sighted about 3 miles from Avalon. Sev- 
eral launches with enthusiastic fishermen 
aboard started after them. Two large fish 
were hooked, but both broke away, taking 
the hook and wire leader with them. 

B. C. Hineman, Los Angeles, Cal. 



that their friends were liberally treated. — Rhine- 
lander, Wis., New North. 

The following letter explains itself : 
In answer to your inquiry regarding the 
truthfulness of the pike catch, Mr. Christof- 
ferson, my son Henry and I caught 45 pike, 
and it is safe to say they weighed 1 to 3 
pounds apiece. We also had a string of 
good sized black bass, not to say anything 
about the large size of pickerel we had. 
We did not fish early or late. 

J. Segerstrom, Rhinelander, Wis. 
You say you had 45 pike, weighing 1 to 3 
pounds each. It is fair to assume, 
therefore, that they would average 2 pounds 
each, making 90 pounds in all. Then you 
say you had a string of black bass, but 
do not say how many nor how much they 
weighed. Probably 20 pounds. You mention 
some large pickerel. Suppose we consider 
this conservatively and say 20 pounds of 
pickerel. This would make your total catch 
weigh 130 pounds, or more than 40 
pounds to each man, at least twice the 
quantity of fish any decent party of 3 
men should catch in a day. So your names 
go in the fish hog book in this wise : J. 
Segerstrom, No. 1,139; G. Christofferson, 
No. 1,140; Henry Segerstrom, No. 1,141. — 
Editor. 



THREE WISCONSIN SWINE. 
Among the local Nimrods who made big catches 
Sunday were Jake Segerstrom and G. Christoffer- 
son. The gentlemen took over 80 pounds of pike 
from one of the county lakes. It is safe to add 



WARDENS FAIL TO KEEP PROMISES. 

Have been reading Recreation several 
years, and enjoy it much. I like the way 
you roast the fish and game hogs, but would 
it not be a good plan to roast some of the 
game and fish wardens and other State 
officers ? 

I am, a lover of outdoor sports, es- 
pecially fishing. We have the Wishna Botna 
river about Y? mile from town. It. is a 
beautiful, deep river, and should be a ?ood 
fishing place, but between here and the 
mouth of this river are 3 dams and no 
fishways. Below these dams the fishing is 
good, many catfish weighing 3 to 17 pounds 
being caught there. The local sportsmen 
have been after the game warden and oth- 
ers and have the promise that fishways will 
be put in at once at each of the dams. This 
promise was given early last spring, but as 
yet nothing has been done, and probably 
all it ever will amount to is a promise. We 
can go fishing here, but the usual luck is 
about what I had Saturday, 8 catfish aver- 
aging 5 inches in length, which, of course, 
I threw back. 

If you care to publish this letter it may 
have some effect, by getting opinions from 
others, and possibly next year we can go out 
with at least the hope of making a fair 
catch. 

N. G. Partridge, Atlantic, Iowa. 



113 



H4 



RECREATION. 



MORE NOVA SCOTIA ROOTERS. 

As a rule, Canadian hunters and anglers 
are decent men, but unfortunately there are 
some swine among them. Here is the latest 
herd that has been reported to me : 

Amherst. — J. H. Douglas, J. W. Taylor, Neil 
Morrison, and H. N. Stevens have returned from 
a successful fishing trip to Summerside. They 
secured 42 dozen splendid trout in one day's fish- 
ing. They were accompanied by A. W. Cummings, 
of Folly Village, and F. L. Rayworth, of Bay- 
field.— Sackville, N. B., Post. 

I inquired as to the truth of this report 
and received the following reply : 

Six of us caught over 500 trout in about 
6 hours' actual fishing. The largest trout 
weighed 2]/ 2 pounds. 

H. N. Stevens, Amherst, N. S. 

Their numbers in the fish hog register are 
as follows: J. H. Douglass, 1,142; J. W. 
Taylor, 1,143; Neil Morrison, 1,144; H. N. 
Stevens, 1,145; A. W. Cummings, 1,146; F. 
L. Rayworth, 1,147. — Editor. 



of the prettiest on the continent and con- 
tains plenty of small mouth bass and muska- 
longe. I obtained several good photos. 

S. E. Sangster, Port Perry, Ont. 



NIBBLES. 
I am informed by reliable persons that 
Oscar Barrows, of Royalston, Mass., caught 
114 trout one day last week. Skin him. 

R. S., Worcester, Mass. 

Confirming this report, I received the fol- 
lowing : 

The story is true, but it happened 2 years 
ago. I caught 67 trout and could see others 
that would not bite, so 2 days later I fished 
the brook again and caught 114. That is 
the largest string of trout I -ever caught ,or 
heard of in these parts. 

O. H. Barrows, Royalston, Mass. 

You should be heartily ashamed of it, in- 
stead of boasting of it. Even though the 
fishing was done 2 years ago, you, do not 
seem to have learned anything in the mean- 
time as to the ethics of real sport. In that 
case, you made a hog of yourself, and you 
now brazenly boast of it. Your number in 
the fish hog book is 1,148. — Editor. 



Last season I spent 6 weeks on the Ka- 
wartha lakes and was completely restored 
to health. 

A great deal of water from Lake Scugog 
was wasted at the mills in Lindsay, caus- 
ing low water in the fall. The unusually 
severe weather had formed thick ice, the re- 
sult being the death of all the muskalonge 
and bass in the lake. There were thou- 
sands piled on the shores last spring, and 
hundreds of gulls feeding on them. The 
Indians tell me that more fish sank to the 
bottom than there were on the shores. There 
are no fish left save perch, etc. 

A party of us took a 2 days' trip through 
Scugog, Sturgeon, Cameron and Balsam 
lakes to Coboconk. The latter lake is one 



Dr. F. G. Legg and his son took many 
large bass last summer, on the lakes in 
Branch county. One day, at Morrison's 
lake, they cought an even dozen black bass 
that for size were winners. One' weighed 
over 5 pounds, another over 4, one 3, and 
the remainder 2 to 3 pounds each. 

W. D. E., Coldwater, Mich. 



James Doran spent 2 months camping and 
fishing on the White river in Rio Blanco 
county. Mr. Doran met John L. Muehl- 
hausen, Dr. Deemer and O. B. Wright, of 
this place. They were enjoying good health 
and having a delightful time. 

T. S., Cripple Creek, Colo. 



A party of Middleboro anglers, including 
Robert Donato, Joseph Benway and Percy 
Harlow, report a successful fishing trip 
along the lakes. 

M. B. E, Brockton, Mass. 



L. M. Peckham and S. E. Thayer, of 
Hardwick, report some excellent pickerel 
fishing at Muddy pond. 

J. F. C, Worcester, Mass. 



ANOTHER ONE. 
[Denver, Nov. 20. — Alexander Suther- 
land, said to have been the last survivor 
of the famous Balaklava six hundred, is 
dead at his home in this city.] 
Fully six thousand they 
That have been laid away 
Since that wild charge that day 

Of the six hundred ! 
Of those who backward rolled 
When death's last bell "was tolled 
Six thousand have grown cold 
Since some one blundered ! 

Oh ! the wild charge they made ! 
When will their glory fade ? 
When will the last be laid 

Of the six hundred? 
Each month that onward flies 
The last survivor dies 
(Unless somebody lies), 

Deathless six hundred ! 

Six hundred fought that day ! ! 
Six thousand laid away 
Bring back that awful fray 

Till we have wondered, 
At ev'ry one's decease, 

At the brigade's increase, 
When will their dying cease? 
Deathless six hundred ! 

— Houston Post. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



Anybody can shoot all day but a gentleman always quits when he gets enough. 



THE OLD KENTUCKY RIFLE. 

In response to a request by a corres- 
pondent of Recreation for a description 
of the iventucky rifle of a generation ago, 
I will describe the style of arm which was 
in common use in the South. 

Up to the time of the Civil War the 
muzzle loading rifle was a favorite weapon 
for small game. In Virginia, the Carolinas 
and Georgia it was generally used for all 
sorts of game except for wing shooting. 

At the age of 12 years I had a hand- 
some Kentucky rifle and it was my con- 
stant companion. Since then I have owned 
several others until about 1870, when I 
procured a Maynard and acquired the 
breech loading habit. 

The Kentucky rifle was heavy, with a 
thick, octagon barrel, 26 to 48 inches long, 



up the barrel, and were finished with a brass 
tip with a hole to receive the ramrod. The 
free end of the barrel had a small, grooved 
bar on the under side, with thimbles for 
the ramrod. In the stock, near the butt 
plate, was a roomy grease box and the butt 
plate had a deep curve in it, which engaged 
the arm of the shooter just inside the 
elbow. The stock was always slender and 
light ; not at all like that of the modern 
shot gun. The great weight of the weapon 
absorbed the recoil of the small powder 
charge, so it was hardly noticed. 

The lock was always fitted with hair 
triggers which would act at the slightest 
touch. 

Altogether the rifle was top-heavy, as 
compared with the modern breech loader. 
The barrel was thick and heavy. The 




LENGTH OF BARREL, 44 INCHES, LENGTH OF STOCK, 15 INCHES. 

CALIBRE, ABOUT 45. 



and carried a round ball, patched with cot- 
ton cloth or buckskin. The favorite cali- 
bers were 30 to 36. We described them by 
the number of round balls required to make 
a pound. From 90 to 120 was a favorite 
size and 60 was considered large. Local 
gunsmiths usually bought the barrels, ready 
grooved, with the locks and other parts 
separate. They would make the stocks and 
assemble the guns in their own shops, often 
ornamenting these weapons with fancy Ger- 
man silver plates in profusion. 

Many rifles in common use were origin- 
ally of the flintlock pattern but altered to 
the percussion system by a plug and a 
nipple, screwed into the barrel where the 
touchhole was. Some were called "Patent 
Breech," having a claw which engaged a 
slot in the iron permanently fixed on the 
stock. Such barrels could be easily re- 
moved from the stock and the nipple was 
screwed into the breech, in the ordinary 
way. 

Most of the old rifles had a tang on the 
breech pin, which extended down the grip 
of the stock and was secured thereto by 
screws. 

' The stock often extended all the way to 
the muzzle and was secured to the barrel 
by small pins which passed through lugs 
on the under side of the barrel. Others 
had stocks which extended about half way 



great weight and length of the rifle made it 
easy to hold in taking aim- 
Being of small size the ramrod had to 
be of the best hickory and nearly as large 
as the bore. It projected several inches 
beyond the muzzle, thereby giving a hand- 
hold to withdraw it when used in swab- 
bing out the bore. 

Careful sportsmen would load and keep 
their rifles with jealous care. Some of 
them would clean out the bore after every 
shot and were extremely careful and pre- 
cise in the exact charge of powder used 
and the quality of the patching. 

I owned a gun and killed game at the age 
of 8 years, having for my instructor my 
grandfather, who used a long rifle and was 
a past master in the art. He was a type of 
the expert still hunter of his day. 

After pouring down a charge of fine 
grained powder a perfect bullet would be 
selected and placed on the muzzle, with the 
greased patch intervening. Then the bullet 
would be forced into the barrel, carrying 
the patch with it, until flush with the muz- 
zle, using for this purpose the handle or 
smooth back of a jackknife. The surplus 
of patching cloth would then be cut off, 
at one swipe of the blade, and the bullet 
forced home, on the powder, with the ram- 
rod. When properly adapted, the bullet 
would glide into place, smooth and true, 



"5 



n6 



RECREATION. 



but it required considerable force on the 
slender rod to put it there. 

The patch should be of just the proper 
thickness, soft and tough, so as to fill the 
grooves just right. An old buckskin glove 
would often be the best thing, though a 
thick cotton drilling was generally used. 
With the bullet in place, a percussion cap 
on the nipple put the rifle in condition for 
immediate use. 

The sights were usually of the common 
pattern. The front sight, a thin slip of 
polished silver, set into a'- slip of steel 
which fitted a dovetailed notch across the 
barrel, near the muzzle. The rear sight 
was a semi-circular notch, with a minute 
nick in the bottom, and this sight was 
often covered with a shade of blackened 
tin, to protect it from the light. 

When the front sight was polished, a fine 
bead would .show at the nick like a tiny 
spark of fire, thus allowing exact aim. 
Every hunter would adjust the sights to 
suit himself and no time nor labor was 
considered too great to accomplish that 
end. 

At a moderate range, say under 75 yards, 
the small bore rifle was wonderfully pre- 
cise. The trajectory of the round bullet, 
at that range, was flat, but would not hold 
up much beyond that distance. 

The still hunter, with his muzzle loader, 
was a careful man in many ways. He 
could not pump half a dozen bullets into 
the game, in as many seconds, but he 
usually brought home the meat with his 
first shot. It was a case of the man behind 
the gun, then as well as now. 

Although my first and best shooting was 
done with such rifles, I soon discarded 
them as too slow and now am content with 
the modern breech loader which is not so 
great a burden to tote and has a longer 
range of action. 1 

Thomas Clarke Harris, Baltimore,' Md. 

In reply to the suggestion of U. N. Dyer, 
who wished to hear something good said 
of the old Kentucky rifle, I have a great 
interest in old time guns, of which I have 
several. Among them is a fine old style 
muzzle loading rifle, made in Nashville, 
Tenn., by Kirkman & Ellis. -The barrel is 
of the finest steel, octagon, 48 inches long; 
stock is of dark curly maple and ex- 
tends the entire length of the barrel. The 
gun is brass mounted. The caliber is about 
36, taking 90 pound balls to the pound 
of lead. There are 7 deep grooves or rifles in 
the barrel. The front sight is of the knife- 
blade style, German silver, the rear sight 
a plain buckhorn with a fine notch, no 
elevation being allowed. The gun is per- 
cussion lock with a set hair trigger. This 
rifle is capable of throwing a ball with the 
greatest accuracy within the limit of its 
range, about 150 yards. There are few 



rifles of to-day that can outshoot these 
old guns. I load my rifle by placing a ball 
in the palm of my left hand and pouring 
out just enough powder to cover it; then 
ram the ball home, with its greased patch. 
These rifles are a great curiosity now, and 
are almost out of use, although I saw sev- 
eral in the Northern part of Minnesota 
last fall. Let us hold the old Kentuckey in 
reverence, because it is so closely asso- 
ciated with the pioneers who went before 
us. I stick by Recreation. 

George W. Huffnagle, Vineland, N. J. 

In July Recreation Mr. U. N. Dyer asks 
concerning the old Kentucky rifle. I have 
one in my collection which is in condition 
to use. It is 7 feet 2 inches long. The stock 
and fore end are all one piece and are of 
snakewood ; the fore end extending to the 
muzzle. The flint lock is extra large and 
the flash pan is prominent. The rifle is 
about 14 gauge and at the muzzle is as thin 
as a modern shot gun ; but the explosion 
chamber must be 1-2 inch thick. The rifle 
weighs about 18 pounds. 

Dr. H. Plympton, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



OLD TIME HUNTERS AND THEIR GUNS. 
The greater part of the hunting in my 
early days was done with a muzzle loading 
rifle of the type generally known as the old 
Kentucky rifle. As a man had only one shot 
in those days it was necessary that he should 
take great care in aiming. A misplaced bul- 
let might cost him his life. Imagine your- 
self face to face with a grizzly, a mountain 
lion or a bunch of red men, with their war 
paint on, with a little load of black powder 
and one little bullet, away down in the back 
end of the barrel, a percussion cap on the 
tube. You pulled the trigger and were not 
quite sure whether the gun would go or not, 
for a little dampness or dirt in the tube 
and it was no go. With those old long 
guns you had to have a steady nerve and 
be a good shot. As a rule all old timers 
were such. In fact, it was necessary with 
them, as a good portion of their living was 
secured with the rifle. It was not safe to 
get nervous. If you shoved a ball down 
before putting the powder in the gun, or 
broke your ramrod, either of which was 
easy, then you would better take to tall 
timber. 

In those days it was considered a dis- 
grace to shoot a squirrel or grouse in the 
body. I have known some of those old men 
who would seldom miss a grouse's head, 
or, in fact, anything they shot at. For accu- 
racy, up to 100 yards, the gun will prob- 
aly never be built that will beat the old time 
muzzje loader. They were loaded with a 
light charge of F F or F F G black powder, 
and a patched bullet ; and one shot a 
minute was considered fast work. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



117 



A man who has never shot one would do 
well to load it at all. One cause of those 
guns having gained such fame is they were 
all finely sighted and the length of the 
barrel gave much greater distance between 
sights than we have in our modern rifles. 
The double set hair triggers enabled the 
shooter to hold dead on while pulling, in- 
stead of pulling off, as we so often do with 
our hard trigger guns. 

Geo. L. Maus, The Dalles, Ore. 



THE UNITED STATES REVOLVER ASSOCI- 
ATION. 

This Association is the national organi- 
zation of the revolver and pistol shots of 
the United States. It was organized in 
1900 and incorporated in 1903. Its objects 
are : "To foster and develop revolver and 
pistol shooting, establish and preserve rec- 
ords, classify arms, encourage and con- 
duct friendly matches between members 
and clubs in our own country as well as 
with our brother shooters abroad." 

Any citizen of the United States interest- 
ed in revolver or pistol shooting is eli- 
gible for membership. There is no initia- 
tion fee. The dues are $1 a year. 

During the 5 years of its existence the 
Association has conducted 2 international 
revolver matches with France, both of 
which were won by the United States. It 
has provided suitable trophies and has es- 
tablished annual championship matches open 
to everybody. These matches are held in 
6 or more places throughout the United 
States each year, and are in charge of a 
regularly appointed officer of the Associ- 
ation in each locality. 

The rules and regulations governing these 
championship contests have been adopted 
by nearly all the active clubs in the coun- 
try, thus securing uniformity in the classi- 
fication of arms as well as in the minor de- 
tails and conditions. Matches between 
teams in remote parts of the country are 
now not only feasible, but are of frequent 
occurrence and extremely interesting. 

The Association has also instituted a 
medal competition to gauge the skill of in- 
dividual shots, wherever they may live. 
Certified targets are issued, and when the 
shooting is done under prescribed condi- 
tions, medals are awarded, and the scores 
recorded in the Record Book of the Asso- 
ciation. Sixty members have already se- 
cured ratings in the records by this method. 

The membership, which in 1900 num- 
bered 40, has increased to over 420, and 
now includes practically all the prominent 
shots in the country. 

The affairs of the Association have been 
managed conservatively from the begin- 
ning. Financially it is in excellent condi- 
tion, and is now accumulating a surplus 



which will be expended in furthering the 
objects of the Association. 

It is proposed to provide a trophy to be 
competed for by teams of 5 men and to 
establish State championships, the latter to 
be determined by the scores made in each 
State in the annual championship matches. 

A booklet containing the constitution, 
rules and regulations governing the cham- 
pionship matches, a list of members, etc., 
will be mailed on application to J. B. Crab- 
tree, Secretary-Treasurer,- 525 Main street, 
Springfield, Mass. 



SMALL SHOT. 
Public sentiment will have to be molded 
against the use of automatic and pump guns 
before their use will be restricted by law. I 
am opposed to both of them. They are not 
sportsmanlike and are sold for the quicker 
extermination of game and the making of 
larger bags. They are weapons of the mar- 
ket hunter ; of the man who would not hesi- 
tate to pot a covey of quail running ahead 
of him in the furrow ; of the man who 
creeps up to a flock of ducks sitting on the 
water and pots as many as he can ; the 
weapon of the man who sells his game and 
thinks more of the money he gets than he 
does of the day's recreation, the difficult 
shot he has made and the easy one he has 
missed. W. B. Mershon, Saginaw, Mich. 



While hunting deer* in the Adirondacks 
last fall I started a buck. Although I 
caught but a glimpse of his flag I sent a 
bullet after him, partly in hope that it 
might find him and partly to warn Bill that 
I had started game. Bill heard the shot, 
and as the buck came his way, fired at it. 
Not knowing where the shot came from the 
animal stopped on a knoll 100 yards from 
where my comrade was standing. Bill tried 
to throw another cartridge into the gun 
and it stuck halfway between the magazine 
and the barrel. Shocked at Bill's remarks, 
the buck hastened out of hearing. The rifle 
was a Marlin. Bill has a Savage now. 

J. W. Furnside, Schenectady, N. Y. 



Will some of Recreation's readers please 
tell me what they think of the 38-55 Win- 
chester for big game ? 

Is there any game in Arizona? If so, 
what kind? 

Long life to Recreation. It is the best 
sportsmen's magazine I ever saw. 

Jas. Gaylord, Nasper, Tenn. 



Do you think 34 inch barrels desirable? 
What are maximum loads of both black and 
smokeless powders for 10 and 12 gauge, 
with B B shot? 

Revalli, Missoula, Mont. 

Will readers of Recreation please an- 
swer ? — Editor. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that is the end of it. If photographed, it may still live and its 
educational and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



THE CROW MUST GO. 

I have written repeatedly of the dastardly 
work of the crow, but he has not yet had 
all that is coming to him. 

The L. A. S. has done rnuch good, and 
I hope will still do good, but the first thing 
that demands its attention is the crow. We 
are putting a stop to the man with the gun 
and now many of us believe that is all there 
is to be done ; that nature will care for it- 
self if we only see that the laws are en- 
forced. It does look that way to the man 
who lies abed till the sun is an hour or 2 
high; but let the same man be up and away 
with the first light of day, and if he is at 
all observing he will soon see and know 
that we have a greater enemy than the man 
with the gun. The crow will follow civil- 
ization to the ends of the earth if there are 
a few trees in the neighborhood where he 
can build a nest. If he can not find carrion 
to eat, he will rob the domesticated hens' 
nests, and when the barnyard fails to sup- 
ply him with foocLhe will take what he can 
find from the State in the shape of eggs 
and young of the song, insectiveorous and 
game birds. 

I am glad to see that other students of 
nature have observed the same thing I 
have. Articles have been published from 
time to time in Recreation, from people all 
over the United States, telling of the depre- 
dations of the crow. In an article in 
Recreation, from Devil's Lake, N. D., the 
nesting place of many of our water fowl, 
the writer endorses my statement, of sev- 
eral years ago : "A substantial bounty per 
head on all crows killed during the nest- 
ing season will assist in the preservatioon 
of our fast disappearing water fowl." 

Many of our States prohibit spring shoot- 
ing, yet the crow thrives and will get fat as 
a consequence. No one ever claims that 
crows are getting fewer. Thev do not fly 
in bunches ready to alight with any stray 
bunch of decoys. Neither do they fly in 
coveys, like prairie chickens and quails. 
Do you know of any bird or mammal that 
hunts for the nesting place of the crows 
and destroys their eggs or the young? 
Crows' eggs always hatch and the young 
always grow to maturity. 

W. L. Blinn, Rockford, 111. 

For a long time I believed that the good 
the crow does in eating bugs and worms 
counterbalanced the evil he does ; but I 
have changed my mind completely on this 
subject and am now advising sportsmen 
everywhere to declare war on him. A long 



time ago I printed an editorial approving 
of the action of a party of sportsmen some- 
where who organized and conducted a big 
side hunt in which the shooting was con- 
fined to crows and English sparrows, and I 
would be glad if sportsmen would conduct 
such side hunts wherever these 2 species of 
vermin exist. 

I should indeed be glad to see laws en- 
acted providing for a bounty of 10 cents a 
head on crows ; but this would be well nigh 
impossible. The farmers wield too big an 
influence in most Legislatures to allow such 
a bill to go through. It would mean an 
expenditure of thousands of dollars, and 
the farmers would claim that such a law 
would be entirely in the interest of city 
sportsmen. We would not agree with this, 
but the other fellows would probably talk 
us down. We are urging 'the passage of 
such laws, and I am sure that 9 out of 
every 10 League members will agree with 
me in this. 

I think I shall draft a bill providing for 
a bounty on the heads of crows and send it 
to all our chief wardens in the States in- 
habitated by these birds, with the recom- 
mendation that they introduce it in their re- 
spective Legislatures and push it. — Editor. 



DO PHEASANTS FAST WHILE SITTING? 
When I first intrusted some of my golden 
and Amherst pheasants with the incubation 
of their own eggs, I was surprised at not 
seeing them off their nests for food or 
drink at any time during" the 22 to 24 days 
required for hatching. I never supplied 
our birds with food over night, so we con- 
cluded these sitters came off their nests at 
daylight, took a drink, scratched up what 
gleanings they could find from the grain 
thrown to the other pheasants the previous 
evening, and returned to their respective 
nests. We have since proven conclusively, 
however, that they went us even one better. 
They never leave their nests from the time 
they commence incubation until the young 
are hatched, and they were given no food 
nor water, either by us or the male pheas- 
ants, during that time. This seems hard to 
believe ; it was for us, but we proved it in 
several ways, and have also received con- 
firmation from other people. At the expi- 
ration of the fast the hens come off with 
their little amber and brown striped chicks, 
in fine condition, and are extremely watch- 
ful, gentle and proud of their little ones. 
L. R., Detroit, Mich. 

I referred the foregoing letter to a friend 



118 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



119 



who has had experience in raising pheas- 
ants, and he replied as follows : 

The story about golden pheasants going 
without food and drink for 22 to 24 days 
may be true, but I doubt it. I showed the 
letter to our gamekeeper, and while he is 
not strong on golden or Amherst pheas- 
ants, he doubts if they can go so long with- 
out food. We raise English birds, and ir- 
respective of the hand raised ones hatched 
out and attended to by domestic hens, the 
old cluckers are fed at regular intervals 
daily and the young pheasants every 2 
hours. The wild pheasants, raising their 
own young or sitting on their own eggs, 
go off the nest to feed early in the morning 
and again in the evening. I have a few 
goldens, and I noticed that one little hen 
in a pen sat extremely close and tight. She 
had a runway, and while I placed food in 
her coop she never left it. However, the 
rats may have eaten the food. 

I take the liberty of forwarding the De- 
troit letter to Mr. D. B. Provoost, of Eliza- 
beth, N. J. He showed me a nice lot of 
young goldens he had recently raised in his 
back yard, and may be able to throw some 
light on the subject. 

S. B. Jameson, Allamuchy, N. J. 

Mr. Provoost writes : 

It is a matter I have never had brought to 
my attention before, but one of my golden 
hens, while sitting on her own eggs, came off 
her nest at least twice last year, and I 
counted her eggs on 2 occasions. This year 
the same hen nested in her coop where I 
could not see her without going in the coop. 
She had food and water in the coop. I do 
not recall seeing her out of her coop while 
nesting this year. Therefore mv observa- 
tions this year are of no value to you. 

D. B. Provoost, Elizabeth, N. J. 



Following my former articles in Recrea- 
tion' about purple martins, I received sev- 
eral letters as to how to make the bird 
houses, etc., and am glad so many of your 
readers were interested. 

The martins were unusually numerous 
this year. I had 18 pairs that raised broods 
of young birds. An average of 4 to each 
pair would make 72 young martins in my 
colony. Three pairs in my dwelling had 13 
young, there being 5 in one nest and 4 each 
in the others. 

Ten years ago no one in this vicinity had 
any purple martins, although they were in 
other portions of the city. A friend of 
mine living on the West Side, who had 
some of the birds, said I lived too near the 
lake, which is 9 blocks away. About 8 
years ago I was fortunate in having a 
pair settle in my bird house, and with 



new ones coming from other localities, and 
from the young, the number has increased 
wonderfully. Within a mile of my place, 
people who never 'knew the bird have be- 
gun to like them and put up houses, so that 
at least 150 pairs have nested this year. 

A few weeks ago the telegraph wires for 
3 to 4 blocks were covered with purple mar- 
tins, the most of the birds being this year's 
crop of young. There must have been 
1,000 to 2,000. 

I had this season one pair of bluebirds, 
one pair of tree swallows, and one pair of 
house wrens. The bluebirds raised 2 broods. 
I regret to say that some fiend killed the 
male tree swallow, as I missed him after 
the birds were breeding. The female made 
a valiant effort to hatch the eggs and raise 
the young, but one time during her absence 
for food a sparrow got in and threw the 
eggs out. 

A male purple martin I also missed just 
about the time the female started laying. 
She managed to hatch the eggs, and suc- 
cessfully rear 2 or 3 young, all by herself. 
As I kept close watch of the bird during 
the time, there is no doubt of this being 
correct. 

The first purple martin of the season ar- 
rived April 6. 

Last evening I was sitting on the porch 
in front of my house, when a neighbor 
called my attention to a flock of birds about 
a block or a block and a half high, and 
wanted to know what ihey were. I at first 
took them for nighthawks, but soon rec- 
ognized them as small gulls, about the size 
of a pigeon. They seemed to be catching 
flies, some of which I noticed in the air 
near. I watched the birds at least 15 min- 
utes, and there is no doubt in my mind that 
they were feeding, as they darted about, 
exactly as the purple martins do when in 
the air feeding. I never saw gulls do this 
before, although they are numerous on the 
lake, and I am much interested to know 
if what I state has been observed before by 
anyone else. 

Frederick Wahl, Milwaukee, Wis. 



"You look awfully tired, young man," 
said the benevolent woman to the young 
man with the books under his arm. 

"Yes, ma'am," replied the student, "I'm 
studying for a doctor." 

"It's a shame ! Why don't you let the 
doctor study for himself?" — Yonkers 
Statesman. 



Mamma — Don't lounge that way, Tom- 
my. Sit up like a man. 

Tommy — Why, mamma, men sit down; 
it's only dogs and rabbits that sit up. — 
Philadelphia Press, 



/HE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



■*■** 



GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President, G. O. Shields, 23 W. 24th St., 
New York. 

1st Vice-President, E. T. Seton, 80 West 
40th St., New York. 

2d Vice-President, W. T. Hornaday, 2969 
Decatur Ave., Bedford Park, N. Y. 

3d Vice-President, Dr. T. S. Palmer, 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

4th Vice-President, A. A. Anderson, 80 
West 40th St., New York. 

5th Vice-President, Hon. W. A. Rich- 
ards, General Land Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

Secretary, A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington 
Ave., Passaic, N. J. . 

Treasurer, Austin Corbin, of the Corbin 
Banking Co., 192 Broadway, New York. 



LIFE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 

Beard, D. C, 204 Amity St., Flushing, L. I. 
Anderson, A. A., 80 W. 40th St.. New York City. 
Blackstone, Lorenzo, Norwich, Conn. 
Buzzacott, Francis F., Chicago, 111. 
Brown, J. Stanford, 489 Fifth Ave., New York 

City. 
Butler, C. E., Jerome, Ariz. 
Carey, Hon. H. W., Eastlake, Mich. 
Carnegie, Andrew, 2d, Fernandina, Fla. 
Carnegie, George, Fernandina, Fla. 
Carnegie, Morris, Fernandina, Fla. 
Corbin, Austin, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
De Pauw, N. T., New Albany, Ind. 
Dickinson, E. H., Moosehead Lake, Me. 
Edgell G. S., 192 Broadway, New York City. 
Ellis, W. D., 136 W. 72d 'St., New York City. 
Fearing, D. B., Newport, R. I. 
Ferry C H., 1720 Old Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Ferry' Mansfield, 183 Lincoln Park Boulevard, 

Chicago, 111. 
Fraser A V. 478 Greenwich St., New York City. 
Gilbert, Clinton, 2 Wall St., New York City 
Hornaday, W. T., 2969 Decatur Ave., 'Bedford 

Park, N. Y. ^ T 

Hudson, E. J., 33 E. 35th St., Bayonne N J. 
McClure, A J., 158 State St., Albany N. Y. 
McDermott, Col., J. H., Morgantown, W. Va. 
Mershon, W. B., Saginaw, Mich. 
Miller F G., 108 Clinton St., Defiance, O. 
Morton, Hon., Levi P., 681 Fifth Ave., New York 

City. 
Nesbitt, A. G., Maple St., Kingston, Pa 
O'Conor, Col. J. C, 24 E. 33d St., New York 

City. 
Oliver Rev. F. E., Winfield, Kans. 
Pierson, Gen. J. F., 20 W. 5^d St., New York 

Prescott," A. L., 90 W. Broadway, New York City. 
Rice A' F., 155 Pennington Ave., Passaic, N. J. 
Rininger, Dr. E. M., 142 E. 27th St, New York 

City. 
Seton, E T., 80 W. 40th St., New York City. 
Seymour, J. H., 35 Wall St., New York City. 
Smith, E. B., Bourse Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith, W. H., Bryn Mawr, Pa 
Thompson, J. Walter, Times Bldg., New York 

City. 
Towne, E. S., Care of National Blank Book Co., 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Underwood, W. L., 52 Fulton St., Boston, Mass. 
Valentine, Dr. W. A., 5 W. 35th St., New York 

City. 
H. Williams, Box 156 Butte, Mont. 



DISCOUNTS TO LEAGUE MEMBERS. 

The following firms have agreed to give 
members of the L. A. S. a discount of 2 
per cent, to 10 per cent, on all goods bought 
of them. In ordering please give L. A S. 
number : 

Syracuse Arms Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Guns. 

Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. Shot 
guns, rifles. 

Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photo- 
graphic goods. 

Blair Camera Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photographic 
goods. 

James Acheson, Talbot St., St. Thomas, Ontario, 
Sporting goods. 

Redifor Rod and Reel Co., Warren, Ohio. 



REPORT FROM MONTANA. 

Speech of Hon. W. F. Scott, State Game 
Warden, at the 6th annual meeting of the 
L. A. S. : 

Mr. President and Gentlemen : Montana, 
as you all know, is one of the largest States 
in the Union, having an area of about 143,- 
000 square miles. I have the honor of be- 
ing the Warden of that State. Previous to 
1901 we had a complete game law, as near- 
ly every State has had, but with absolutely 
no provision for enforcement except 
through peace officers, and, of course, you 
know what interest constables, policemen 
and such officers take in the enforcement 
of game laws. In 1901 a bill was introduced 
in our Legislature providing for a depart- 
ment of fish and game. It passed, with an 
assessment of i-ioth of a mill on all the 
taxable property of the State, for a game 
protective fund. That gives us a revenue of 
about $20,000 a year, and with that are 
placed the license fees collected from non- 
residents. This license is $25 for hunting 
large game, and $15 for hunting small game. 
There are also placed in this fund all fines 
collected by this department ; so we have a 
large amount of money in our fund, but 
we can not gain access to it. 

The number of deputies provided for by 
this bill is 8. This does not include the 
State Game Warden, but the State Game 
Warden has 8 deputies and they are paid 
$100 a month and allowed their expenses 
while traveling out of their own districts. 
The State is divided into 8 districts, and 
these average about 15,000 to 18,000 
square miles to the man. The deputy 
must pay his own expenses while 
traveling in his own district. The law is 
lame. The fund keeps multiplying as the 
years go on, and the Legislature will no 
doubt wipe out the i-ioth mill tax. 

I have been worrying a good deal as to 
how to get at this surplus (laughter), and 



120 



LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



121 



being a new hand in politics I have not yet 
devised a way. 

We passed, at the last Legislature, a law 
which restricts the shipment of game. Here- 
tofore we have had no restriction on ship- 
ment of game outside the State, and people 
had a right to ship all the game they chose. 
Now we have a law which leaves the ques- 
tion of shipment entirely with the State 
Game Warden as to whether a hunter may 
ship game out of the State. Non-residents 
buy their licenses, which entitle them to 
kill a limited quantity of game and take it 
out, provided it is properly ticketed. This 
new law holds express companies and their 
employees liable for any violations. 

We have a new feature which was taken 
from the Wyoming game law, namely, the 
licensing of guides and making the guides 
ex officio game wardens and holding them 
responsible for the acts of the hunters 
whom they may take out. Every man who 
guides in Montana for pay must make an 
affidavit and have it signed by 3 responsible 
taxpayers of the county in which he lives, 
that he is of good moral character and re- 
sponsible, and he must take the oath of 
deputy game warden and pay $10 for a li- 
cense. As soon as he returns from a trip 
he is required to make a report, stating the 
number of days he has been employed, the 
names of the persons whom he took out, 
and if non-residents, the number of their 
licenses. He must also give an itemized 
account of the number of heads of game 
killed by each member of the party. That 
is a good law and it is working well. 

Another good feature of our law is that 
it licenses taxidermists. Taxidermists are a 
hard class of people to handle. Heretofore 
we could go through a taxidermist's shop, 
but we had no way of finding out whom the 
hides belonged to that were there in pickle ; 
so we passed a law providing for the licens- 
ing of taxidermists. They pay $25 a year 
and render an itemized statement each 
month of the number of heads and hides 
received, and to whom they belong; also 
of the number of heads of game they have 
on hand the 1st of each month and the 
amount of game shipped out. Thus we 
have an absolute check on them. We know 
exactly what goes out, what comes in and 
to whom it belongs. When we call on them 
we take our reports along and check them. 
If there is any discrepancy the taxidermists 
must explain. Of course, they complain 
about the law and say it is unconstitutional, 
but they have not tested it yet, and I think 
it will stand. 

The National Park borders on my State 
and it is an interesting place for any one to 
visit. It is a great breeding ground for 
game, because game is protected there. The 
Park is now in charge of Major Pitcher, 
one of the most enthusiastic game protec- 



tors and one of the pleasantest gentle- 
men to be found anywhere. The Govern- 
ment employees in the Park, as well as the 
soldiers and civilian scouts, whose duty it is 
to patrol the Park, do their work well at 
all times. They take their saddle and pack- 
horses and go out and stay for weeks, pa- 
trolling the borders of the Park, and I have 
deputized each one of the scouts as a game 
warden for Montana, so they have juris- 
diction to come over the Park line into 
Montana and make arrests. They have 
given us more assistance than any other 
class of people, and they have broken up 
along the borders of the Park several gangs 
of poachers which have been operating 
there for years. 

Public sentiment in that community is 
rapidly growing in favor of game protec- 
tion, and we have but few reports of viola- 
tions in that section. I went up to the 
Park the other day to see Major Pitcher, 
and driving over to the Mammoth Hot 
Springs, we drove into a band of 33 moun- 
tain sheep. I have often seen mountain 
sheep when hunting, but I never got so 
close to them as I did there. We got within 
25 or 30 feet of them. They got up on the 
sides of the cut and stood there, looking 
down at us as we drove by. I was in a 
Government ambulance, and I had the 
driver stop while I made several pictures 
of them. 

When I got up to headquarters the Major 
said, 

"I will feed some of my pets to-night," 
and asked if I would like to see them. 

I said I certainly should, and he ordered 
the soldiers to bring out the feed on to the 
grounds in front of the barracks and in 
front of the hotel stables. Right in the 
center of the parade grounds we soon 
counted 68 mule deer that came down to 
feed, and thev walked about the officers' 
quarters like domestic sheep. We took pic- 
tures of them, sometimes getting within 8 
or 10 feet of them. There were some of the 
largest bucks I have ever seen. They 
were originally wild game. They come out 
over the borders of the Park each year 
and are hunted. It would seem that a man 
might go out and shoot one easily on the 
border of the Park, but it seems that as 
soon as they go over the boundary line 
they know it, and then one can not get any 
closer to them than to the other wild game. 

Up on the branch, possibly a mile from 
the Springs, we saw enormous numbers of 
elk. There must have been 2,000 or 3,000; 
and down on the flat, coming home, we saw 
between 400 and 500 antelope feeding. 
They are a little wilder than deer. 
One can not get closer than 30 or 40 yards 
from them ; but the deer are like domestic 
animals. 

In the winter, when the snow is deep, it 



122 



RECREATION. 



is worth while to see these animals. Even 
persons who have been raised in the far 
West and used to all kinds of game can see 
more wild game in the Park in a day than 
they ever saw in their whole lives. It is a 
great breeding ground, and the surplus will 
wander over the borders of the Park into 
adjoining States and keep them thoroughly 
stocked. 

I believe Montana has a more varied 
Rocky mountain game than any other 
State in the Union to-day. We pos- 
sibly have not so many birds as some other 
States, but what we are shy on the bird 
crop we have in the big game crop. 

Another good feature of our law which 
has been in force ever since 1897 is the ab- 
solute prohibition of the sale of game. We 
are a young State, but we are among the 
first to inaugurate that feature of game pro- 
tection. In Montana you may travel 
months and never find a piece of game on 
sale anywhere. You may go to any restau- 
rant or hotel or eating house in the State 
and you would not find a piece of game on 
sale. That is the foundation for all game 
laws. As soon as you stop the sale of game, 
you destroy the incentive of the mar- 
ket hunter. A hunter will not go out and 
live on sow belly and kill game if he has 
no way of disposing of it that will bring 
him revenue. He will turn his hands to 
pursuits which are more honorable and 
profitable. 

Another question I have worried about a 
great deal is the Indian proposition. I don't 
know whether you Eastern gentlemen ap- 
preciate the situation, but my Western 
brothers, no doubt, will agree with me when 
I say it is a difficult problem to handle. 

In Eastern Montana the Missouri river 
winds down in a zigzag, crooked way. The 
lands in the bends, when large, is 
known as bottoms, and when' small, 
as points. The Indians surround one of 
these bottoms, or points, and send the 
women and children in with tin pans, 
bells or anything they can make a noise 
with, to drive the deer out, and they are 
slaughtered in countless numbers. It is an 
evil that needs careful consideration and 
demands the attention of the National Gov- 
ernment. 

We passed a bill which made it unlawful 
for any Indian to leave his reservation 
armed in any way, and we tried to enforce 
it. We confiscated guns and have several 
lawsuits pending. I don't know just where 
we are going to get off (laughter), but we 
shall keep at it till we land somewhere. 

Now that we have a license law we have 
prosecuted some Kootenais for hunting 
without licenses ; but when you are abso- 
lutely certain that you are convicting a non- 
resident Indian, you are liable to be mak- 
ing a mistake. They all look alike, and you 



can't tell whether they are Flatheads or 
Crees or Kootenais. We are up against it, 
and ' I should like to see the Legislature 
enact some law that would reach these 
cases. 

Idaho, Wyoming and several of the West- 
ern States are in the same box. As to the 
League of American Sportsmen, no other 
organization has helped us as the League 
has. As Mr. Fullerton said, it seems to be 
fearless ; more so than the local organiza- 
tion. A man who belongs to a local club 
will come to you and say : 

"I want to tell you about something I ran 
across up the valley the other day." 

He will explain all about it ; "but," he 
says, "don't bring my name into this case." 

"Why not? Can you give me an idea 
where I can get the facts ?" 

"No, no, I can't do that; but you don't 
know how much violation is going on up 
there." 

"Well, won't you give me some idea ; let 
me send a man." 

"No, no ! If you send a man up there 
they will know it was I who told you ; but 
something ought to be done there soon." 

They come around with such propositions 
and then go out and scatter the report 
broadcast that you are not doing your duty. 
People of that kind are no good in any com- 
munity, especially along the lines of game 
protection. I have found the League mem- 
bers to be made of different stuff. They 
try to assist us in every way possible, and 
•they have done great work out there. In 
regard to the official organ of the League, 
you may go anywhere, even in the thinly 
settled sections of our State, and you will find 
on top of the sewing machine an almanac and 
a copy of Recreation. (Applause.) So the 
League is doing great work and is making 
public sentiment for us, and that is all that 
is necessary. Public sentiment is the main 
thing. (Applause.) 



AN APPEAL TO SPORTSMEN. 

- Many sportsmen when on hunting trips are in 
the habit of shooting, simply for practice, birds 
that can in no sense be considered game. Large 
numbers of red birds, martins, larks, woodpeckers, 
sapsuckers, flickers, catbirds, bullbats, and birds 
of like character are destroyed every year. With- 
out considering the aesthetic side of the question, 
such birds should not be killed, from an economic 
standpoint. They are of great value to the public 
as worm, bug and insect destroyers. A drove of 
bullbats is of more value to a malarial district than 
a grove of quinine trees, as the diet of these birds 
in spring and summer consists principally of mos- 
quitoes. No true sportsman will kill these valu- 
able servants for practice shooting. 

This appeal is made to the sportsmen to con- 
sider the great value of the non-game birds, and 
it is believed that they will not only abstain from 
killing such birds but will preach the gospel of 
protection at all times. 

J. E. Redding, R. VV. 
Yazoo Chapter, League American Sportsmen. 
— Yazoo, Miss., Herald. 



AUTOMOBILE NOTES. 



Edited by J. A. Kingman. 



AUTOMOBILE BODIES. 



Numerous styles of bodies are used on 
automobiles, but the tonneau is by far the 
most popular. The name is French for tub, 
and the tonneau body in its original form 
came to us from France. For years the ton- 
neau body consisted of a front seat and a 
rear seat, the former sometimes in the form 
of a plain seat, straight across, accommo- 
dating 2 or 3 passengers at a pinch, but 
more often, and of late almost entirely, in 
the form of 2 separate, or bucket-shaped, 
seats. This arrangement has the advantage 
of holding each passenger firmly in place 
and prevents the occupant of the front left 
seat from sliding into and interfering with 
the driver when going at high speed over 
lumpy roads. Of course, the driver almost 
invariably sits at the right of the car. It 
it rare for the wheel or tiller to lie at the 
left. 

The rear seats of the tonneau have been 
made more comfortable of late years. At 
first the tonneau was a tiny and uncomfor- 
table affair, seating 2 grown persons with 
difficulty. The sides of a tonneau are built 
high, so that articles carried therein, such 
as suit cases, wraps and the like, will 
not spill out ; and in some large cars the 
tonneau is roomy enough to contain 5 per- 
sons. Ordinarily, however, the' tonneau 
seats 3. 

This coming season the universally pop- 
ular tonneau will have double side-door en- 
trances instead of the single rear entrance 
employed so many years. The advantages 
of the side entrances are fairly obvious ; 
there are 2 entrances and exits instead of 
one ; the car may be driven to either curb 
so that the passengers may enter or leave it 
without dismounting into the road; and it 
gives a more comfortable rear seat, with 
better facilities for carrying tools, supplies 
and the like. One objection is that the 
framework must be longer in order to ac- 
commodate the longer body, and this makes 
a longer car; in most cases longer than is 
necessary or convenient. What the design- 
ers are busy over now, is the working out of 
a design which shall combine the side en- 
trance tonneau with a moderately short 
wheel base. A car with a long wheel base 
takes up. a good deal of room, is not any too 
easy to manage when entering or leaving a 
garage or automobile storage station, and 
has other drawbacks. 

Tops and closed bodies grow more pop- 
ular every year. In the early days people 
were more or less indifferent about bodies 
and the comforts thereof as long as 

123 



the machine would run. Now that great 
reliability has come, people are more closely 
considering their own comfort. The Cape 
cart hood will be popular during the com- 
ing summer. It is made of waterproof 
cloth, in appearance is something like an 
extension buggy top, and can be used for 
a dust shield or sun shade, as well as a 
means of protection against rain. The 
heavy canopy, supported on metal uprights 
and having a folding glass front, I look to 
see almost entirely displaced this season by 
the Cape cart hood. The latter is much 
lighter and cheaper and just as effective 
The glass front is not much advantage in 
rainy weather, for it fogs, and then the 
operator can not see through it. Moreover, 
it makes great wind resistance when low- 
ered in place. 

HOW TO START THE CAR. 

There is a right as well as a wrong way 
of starting a gasoline car. Who has not 
watched or experienced the wrong way and 
wondered why a driver with any pretensions 
to skill should follow it? The engine is 
started and the occupants of the car brace 
themselves for the shock that they know is 
coming. The clutch is thrown in and the 
car plunges forward abruptly ; it almost 
seems as if the sudden and tremendous ap- 
plication of power had lifted it off the 
ground. The passengers are forced back 
into their seats and then brought forward 
as the car picks up its speed. The process 
is a good imitation of that of a trolley car 
in a congested street when the motorman 
plays with the power, alternately applying 
and shutting it off, tilting the passengers 
back and forth as if they were manikins. 

A driver who knows his business never 
starts in this way, any more than a locomo- 
tive engineer does. He introduces his 
clutch gradually, permitting only part of 
the power to be transmitted at first, thus 
starting the car without the suspicion of a 
jerk. It gathers way, slowly at first, but 
before many yards have been traversed the 
clutch is forced home and the full power of 
the engine is being transmitted to the gear- 
ing. 

The saving in wear and tear of engine, 
gears, frame, springs, wheels and tires by 
this method of starting is enormous. — Mo- 
tor World. 



LIBELOUS SENSATION REPORTS. 
Any one outside the ranks of automo- 
bilists reading the daily papers might easily 
get the impression that users of automobiles 



124 



RECREATION. 



are without exception a lawless lot. Inci- 
dents of the most trivial character, which, 
if occurring in the case of horse-drawn ve- 
hicles, would get a scant paragraph, are 
worked up into sensations. Distortion and 
exaggeration fill in all details necessary to 
make a story out of some commonplace in- 
cident of city or country traffic. In the 
eager campaign of scandal mongering and 
head line sensation there is neither time nor 
inclination to search for truth, and, indeed, 
this is more laborious work than those who 
do not write for a living realize. — The Au- 
tomobile. 



of automobiles ; in 1903, 46 million, and in 
1904, 56 million. 



K bets that in driving a wagon or an 
automobile around a right-hand corner at a 
high rate of speed it will tip over to the 
right. 

H bets it will tip to the left.— S. P. H., 
New Haven, Conn. 

ANSWER. 

H wins the bet. The reason the wagon 
or automobile would tip over to the left 
in turning a right hand corner at high 
speed is because the centrifugal force is not 
compensated for. In a railroad track the 
outer rail on a curve is elevated so that the 
train will not have to reduce speed in .turn- 
ing the corner. A bicycle race track is 
banked for the same reason. — Editor. 



An auction sale of second hand automo- 
biles held in New York city demonstrated 
the value of advertising. Farmers and per- 
sons of inexperience were in the majority 
among the buyers, and the well posted visi- 
tors were repeatedly amazed to see an ex- 
cellent car knocked down at a ridiculously 
low price, while others sold at figures well 
up toward the list price for new models. 
In every case the big bargains were in cars 
that are not well known to the general 
public, because not extensively advertised, 
while the high prices were brought by ma- 
chines that have been widely advertised. — ■ 
Automobile Topics. 



If acetylene lamps are to be expected to 
give satisfactory service, the gas genera- 
tors should be thoroughly cleaned every 
time they are rilled. A good way to do 
this is to use a hose and water under pres- 
sure, compressing the end of the hose so as 
to make the water stream out forcibly. 
See that all the residue is thoroughly re- 
moved from the generator before refilling 
with carbide. — Motor World. 



The reason French automobiles have been 
so popular is that French manufacturers 
started sooner, got on the right track quick- 
er and have kept ahead till now. In 1902 
France reported 2d. million francs' worth 



Henry Souther, of Hartford, after mak- 
ing some exhaustive tests of anti-freezing 
solutions for use in gasoline cars in winter, 
declares that the problem is now substan- 
tially solved. A mixture of wood alcohol 
and glycerine is the proper thing to use. 



Showing the interest taken in automobile 
construction, a competition has been organ- 
ized, to be held in Paris, whereby actual 
owners of cars enter them in classes ar- 
ranged according to the price of the chassis, 
or machinery. 



"I think I'll try filling the tires of my 
automobile with illuminating gas," said the 
amateur chauffeur. 

"Good joke," gurgled his fool friend. 
"Expect to make it light. Ha, ha !" 

"Nothing of the kind," replied the ama- 
teur chauffeur. "I thought it might in- 
crease the speed of the machine. Just think 
how the ' stuff makes the wheels of a gas 
meter spin around." — Chicago News. 



"Do you think the automobile will ever 
take the place of the horse?" asked the 
man who was standing around watching 
the tourist trying to repair a breakdown. 

"My friend," was the response, "that is 
an unimportant Question. The problem now 
is to get a horse to take the place of the 
automobile." — Washington Star. 



Miss Frightleigh — How did you manage 
to retain your composure when the auto 
blew up? 

Mrs. Flareup — Mr. Flareup has such a 
furious temper, you know, that I am used 
to explosions. — Detroit Free Press. 



Sunday School Teacher: Tommy Mc- 
Grath, can you tell me who threw the 
stone that struck Goliath? 

Tommy : Ye kin search me. Our street's 
all tore up, an' dey ain't no autermobiles 
goes dat way. — Brooklyn Life. 



An Ohio exchange says : "A Michigan 
editor has had a streak of bad luck. He 
was just about to step into his new. $10,000 
automobile the other night when 3 bed slats 
gave way and he awoke." 



"My kingdom for a horse!" cried Rich- 
ard III. 

And a moment later he was seen slowly 
emerging from under his balky automobile. 
—Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



FORESTRY. 



It tokes 30 years to grow a tree and 30 minutes to cut it down and destroy it. 



CHESTNUT FOR WOOD LOTS. 

Throughout the Northeastern States, 
from Massachusetts to Maryland, and as 
far West as Indiana, chestnut holds an im- 
portant place as a timber tree. Commer- 
cially, it is chiefly in demand for ties, tele- 
graph and telephone poles, and posts, for 
all of which purposes, as well as for some 
constructional uses, it is especially adapted 
by its peculiar power to resist decay in con- 
tact with the soil. It is also largely used 
for fuel and general farm purposes. In 
Maryland alone, according to the 12th cen- 
sus, its annual market yield of lumber, rail- 
road ties and telegraph and telephone poles 
amounts to over $100,000, besides large sup- 
plies of material for local consumption. 

It happens that chestnut is especially fit- 
ted for management in farmers' wood lots. 
Before scientific forestry began to be heard 
of in the United States, and when forest 
preservation was not uncommonly talked 
about as a sentimental fad, the thrifty own- 
ers of the small tracts of woodland which 
cover so much of Southern New England, 
New York, Pennsylvania and neighboring 
States had long been cutting successive 
crops of the hardwoods which sprout rap- 
idly from the stump, thus practicing more 
or less rudely what the forester calls the 
"pure coppice" method of management. 
The superior market for chestnut, com- 
bined with its rapid growth, gave it the 
leading place in the esteem of these wood- 
lot owners, who by winter cutting were 
able to turn to good account time for which 
farm occunations gave no other employment. 
The results of a study recently conducted 
and soon to be published by the Bureau of 
Forestry show strikingly the advantages of 
chestnut for this kind of management, and 
at the same time suggest some practical 
conclusions concerning how the methods 
' now in vogue may be improved. Like other 
trees which reproduce by sprouting, chest- 
nut loses its vigor when the root svstem be- 
comes too old. Trees grown from seed 
increase, both in height and bulk, more 
slowly for many years than those grown as 
sprouts from the stump. But by the time 
the trees are 80 to 100 years old the seed- 
ling trees will catch up, and eventually 
reach a larger size than the others. For 
ordinary uses, however, chestnut is cut long 
before this age is reached, and coppicing 
is therefore the best way to raise it; but 
unless new seedling growth starts in the 
forest^ along with the sprout growth, the 
declining vigor of the old root systems will 
result in smaller and smaller production 



until only a sickly stand of inferior timber 
is left to draw on. 

Chestnut tends to produce seed abundant- 
ly, and if the nuts were left to sow them- 
selves the forest would take care of itself; 
but crows, squirrels and other animals 
levy a heavy toll. Far more formidable, 
however, in well settled regions, are the 
gatherers of nuts for the market. With 
chestnuts selling at an average of $2.50 a 
bushel, there is a premium on the seed crop 
which makes propagation of the tree 
through this means a matter of dubious 
chance. When in addition hogs are per- 
mitted to range the woods for mast, and 
cattle to browse the tender shoots as they 
rise from the ground, the prospect of seed- 
ling growth is small indeed. 

Chestnut is not exacting in its soil re- 
quirements. Its roots spread comparatively 
deep, so that it is not so sensitive to fire or 
humus destruction from any cause as most 
species. Its sprouts grow so fast that -a 
height of 7 or 8 feet at the end of the first 
season is not uncommon, and its stumps are 
so vigorous that one will often produce 40 
to 50 sprouts. Not more than one in 8 or 
10 of these will mature, but by selecting 
the most promising the full vigor of the 
parent stump may be concentrated on them 
to the great improvement of their rate of 
growth. The observations made by the 
Bureau have proved that low stumps pro- 
duce more vigorous sprouts than high ones, 
and that winter or spring cutting is fol- 
lowed by better results than that done in 
the summer or fall. Telephone poles are 
grown, in Maryland, from healthy stumps 
in 35 to 38 years, and ties may profitably be 
cut in about 29 years. Too early cutting 
of ties should be discouraged as wasteful 
in the long run. The practice of permitting 
contractors to cut unrestrictedly for a given 
sum is one which works much injury to the 
permanent productiveness of the woods. 

The Bureau is thus doing excellent prac- 
tical work for the owners of small tracts of 
timberland, for whom the employment of a 
forester is out of the question, but for whom 
the application of the knowledge furnished 
by scientific forestry is essential, if they 
are to reap the full value of their holdings. 
The largest tree in the world, so far as 
reported, is supposed to be a chestnut which 
was recently cut in the vicinity of Mount 
.ZEtna. It is said to be 212 feet in circum- 
ference 60 feet from the ground. More re- 
markable than its huge girth is the point 
on the trunk at which this measurement is 
said to have been made. 



"5 



126 



RECREATION. 



THE AMERICAN FOREST CONGRESS 

The most notable meeting that has ever 
been held in this country to consider the 
subject of forestry and its allied interests 
was held in Washington during the first 
week in January. It brought together a 
larger body of active men engaged in prac- 
tical business than ever before assembled 
to consider an economic question. The 
Governors of 22 States appointed and were 
represented by delegates ; 25 of the leading 
railroads were represented, including the 
presidents of 12 roads. Among the espe- 
cially prominent railroad men present were : 
President Hill, of the Great Northern. 
President Eliot, of the Northern Pacific. 
President Winchell, of the Rock Island. 
President Stevens, of the Chesapeake and 
Ohio. President Spencer, of the Southern 
Pacific. President Harding, of the Pere 
Marquette. President Johnson, of the Nor- 
folk and Western. President Hoyt, of the 
Missouri, Kansas and Texas ; and President 
Hughitt, of the Chicago and Northwestern. 
All the large telephone companies and both 
the Western Union and the Postal Tele- 
graph companies were ably represented. 
The lumber interests were naturally better 
represented than any others ; and the graz- 
ing interests were represented by a num- 
ber of influential men from the Western 
States. 

Prominent representatives of the mining 
interests were present, and editors of nearly 
all the lumber trade journals. 

Nearly every member of the Society of 
American Foresters was present ; also 
nearly the entire force of the United States 
Bureau of Forestry. The students of the 
Yale Forest School were required to report 
for the beginning of the winter term at the 
Congress instead of at New Haven. Other 
forest schools were represented by many of 
their students and faculty. 

The delegates to the Congress were re- 
ceived in a body by the President at the 
New Year's reception at the White House, 
President Roosevelt being the honorary 
president of the Congress. Tuesday after- 
noon the delegates met in the National 
Rifles Armory for the first regular meeting, 
The subject was the Importance of the 
Public Forest Lands to Irrigation, and was 
discussed by the Government Engineers in 
charge of the arid land reclamation work 
and by representatives of the vast agricul- 
tural interests so absolutely dependent on 
irrigation for their existence. 

"The Lumber Industry and the Forests," 
"The Importance of the Public Forest 
Lands to Grazing," "Forestry in Relation to 
Railroad Supplies," "The Importance of 
Public Forest Lands to Mining," and "Na- 
tional and State Forest Policy" were the 
most important subjects considered. 



HOW FORESTRY DIFFERS FROM LUMBER- 
ING 

The connection between lumbering and 
forestry is vague in the minds of many 
people, and the line of difference between 
the work of the forester and of the lumber- 
man is even more confusing. This arises 
from the fact that the result to be obtained 
is similar in both cases. The lumberman's 
business is to harvest his lumber crop at 
the best profit; and' after all is said and 
done the forester's work is exactly that. In 
general, however, the lumberman's aim is 
to make the greatest immediate profit, while 
the forester aims to make the forest yield 
the greatest continued income throughout 
its life. The forest never dies with the 
forester. 

A working plan as made by a forester, is 
first of all a plan for lumbering. It specifies 
the diameter limit to which trees shall be 
taken and includes estimates of yield. It 
fixes the areas to be logged over, forecasts 
the profits to be realized, and sums up the 
whole situation from a business point of 
view. This far, it treats of what is to be 
done in- the forest entirely from the stand- 
point of the lumberman, and it is based on 
the same study of local conditions that any 
good lumberman makes before he fells a 
tree. The lumberman's working plan, how- 
ever, usually considers only the most profit- 
able way of harvesting the merchantable 
timber. The forester's plan is made with a 
view also to the removal of the mature 
timber in such a way as to hasten the pro- 
duction of a second crop. In spite of much 
that has been said to the contrary, there is 
no other radical difference in purpose be- 
tween the 2. Both wish to make the forest 
pay as high a rate of interest as possible on 
the capital it represents. The lumberman, 
however, is usually content to receive re- 
turns only once from the -same area, while 
the forester lumbers with a view to lum- 
bering again. Exactly the same study of 
the quality and amount of merchantable 
timber, of the conditions of transportation, 
and the market open to it for sale, is neces- 
sary under lumbering and under forestry. 

Lumbermen do not need foresters and 
foresters do not need lumbermen. But 
lumbermen need to be foresters and for- 
esters need to be lumbermen. 



Stranger (at the door) — I am trying to 
find a lady whose married name I have 
forgotten, but I know she lives in this 
neighborhood. She is a woman easily de- 
scribed, and perhaps you know her; a singu- 
larly beautiful creature, with pink and 
white complexion, seashell ears, lovely eyes, 
and hair such as a goddess might envy. 
Servant — Really, sir, I don't know — 
Voice (from head of stairs) — Jane, tell 
the gentleman I'll be down in a minute. 
—London Tit-Bits. 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 

Edited by C. F. Langworthy, Ph.D. 
Author of "On Citraconic, Itaconic and Mesaconic Acids," "Fish as Food," etc. 

''What a Man Eats He Is." 



NUTMEG AND, MACE. 

The nutmeg is the kernel of the seed 
Myristica fragrans, a dioecious evergreen 
tree found wild in the Banda islands and 
some of the neighboring islands extending 
as far as New Guinea. The following state- 
ments occur in a recent summary of data 
regarding this spice : "Nutmegs and mace 
are almost exclusively obtained from the 
Banda islands, although the cultivation has 
been attempted with varying success in 
Singapore, Penang, Bengal, Reunion, Brazil, 
French Guiana and the West Indies. The 
trees yield fruit in 8 years after the seed is 
sown, reach their prime in 25 years, and bear 
60 years longer. Almost the whole surface of 
the Banda islands is planted with nutmeg 
trees. The light, volcanic soil, shade and 
excessive moisture of these islands, where it 
rains more or less during the whole year, 
seem exactly to suit the requirements of the 
nutmeg tree. 

"In Bencoolen the tree bears all the year 
round, but the chief harvest takes place in 
the later months, and the smaller one in 
April, May and June. In the Banda islands 
the fruits are gathered in small, neatly made 
oval baskets at the end of a bamboo. This 
prevents bruising, the baskets being opened 
half their length on one side and furnished 
with 2 small prongs projecting from the 
top, by which the fruit stalk is broken, the 
fruit falling into the basket. The ripe fruit 
is about 2 inches in diameter, of a rounded 
pear shape, and when mature splits into 
halves, exposing a crimson arillus surround- 
ing a single seed. When the fruit is col- 
lected the pericarp is first removed, then the 
arillus is carefully stripped off and dried, in 
which state it forms the mace of commerce. 
The seed consists of a thin, hard testa or 
shell enclosing a kernel, which, when dried, 
is the nutmeg. To prepare the nutmeg for 
use the seed enclosing the kernel is dried 
at a gentle heat in a drying house over a 
small fire for about 2 months, the seeds being 
turned over every second or third day. When 
thoroughly dry, the shells are broken with 
a wooden mallet or a flat board and the 
nutmegs picked out and sorted, the small, 
inferior ones being removed for the expres- 
sion of the fixed oil which they contain, and 
which forms the so called oil of mace. The 
dried nutmegs are then rubbed over with 
dry sifted lime. The process of liming, 
which originated at the time when the Dutch 
held a monopoly of the trade, was com- 
menced with a view of preventing the germ- 
ination of the seeds, which were formerly 
immersed 3 months in milk of lime for this 
purpose; and a preference is still manifested 



in some countries for nutmegs so prepared. 

"There is a remarkable difference between 
the Banda trees and those of the Straits. 
This has to do with their respective heights. 
The tree of the Straits is a mere shrub 
compared with that of the Banda islands, 
where 50 to 60 feet is no uncommon size. 
The male tree is much shorter lived than the 
fruit-bearing one. The Banda fruit hangs 
on longer and more slender stalks than that 
of the Straits, the skin is more free from all 
blemish, more thin relatively to the fruit 
and of more uniform pronortion. The Ban- 
da manner of breaking the fruit when dried 
is also superior to that followed in the 
Straits. This is done by spreading them on 
a sort of drumhead and striking them with 
flat pieces of board. Several are cracked at 
each stroke and resupplied as fast by a man 
standing alongside. One man in this way 
w T ill' break more nuts without injury than 
half a dozen men after the Straits fashion. 

"It is computed that each female tree at 
full maturity, under careful culture, will 
yield 10 pounds of nutmegs and about one 
pound of mace annually. Nutmegs are di- 
vided into 2 varieties, royal and green. The 
former are of a larger size and have their 
mace longer than the nttt, which, in the lat- 
ter, is not entirely enveloped by the leafy 
network. Good nutmegs are distinguished 
by being large, round and heavy, finely 
marbled and of a light gray color." 



VEGETABLES IN ANCIENT ROME. 

The ancient Romans had in their gardens 
in early times beans, peas, lentils, chick- 
peas, and onions. As pointed out by a recent 
writer, "The potato was, of course, wanting 
to the Roman garden, but Cato considered 
the cabbage the king of vegetables, and it 
is likely that many varieties of the plant 
were cultivated in his day." He thought it 
surpassed all other vegetables, and liked it 
"both cooked and raw, dressed with vine- 
gar." The best artichokes came from Car- 
thage, whence had been imported the Malum 
punicum, or pomegranate ; also, apparently, 
the finest figs. One recollects the clever 
use made by the same Cato of a bunch of 
fresh Carthaginian fisrs, which, being sud- 
denly produced from beneath his toga, were 
intended to convince his hearers that great 
Carthage was become too near a commercial 
riva 1 in the Mediterranean for the security 
of Rome. 

"Fennel and lettuce, both, among the Phoe- 
nicians, sacred to Adonis, were regarded, as 
they still are here, particularly good for the 
'Minister of the Interior' ; also as sleep pro- 
ducers. Venus is said to have salved the 



127 



128 



RECREATION. 



wounds of Adonis with lettuce. Pliny men- 
tions a family who were not ashamed of 
their name in fact, a branch of the gens 
Valeria lactucini. Pumpkin (cucurbita) 
and cucumber (cucumis) may both have been 
cultivated in quite early times. The Emperor 
Tiberius, probably a temperate man, at one 
time is said to have eaten cucumber daily. 
Endive and wild asparagus were greatly es- 
teemed, though the latter was thought in- 
ferior to a kind grown at Ravenna, and to 
that brought from Germany. 

"Let us turn from these vegetables, how- 
ever, to the fruit trees, which in early days 
must perforce have been rare, perhaps in- 
cluding only apples, pears, certain nuts, to- 
gether with the almond and the fig, and 
even those came to Rome chiefly from other 
districts in Italy, such as Picenum, Nola and 
Taranto. The pomegranate, which has 
always thriven in Roman soil, was no doubt 
an early introduction from Carthage, per- 
haps by way of Sicily ; and, of course, the 
olive was regarded almost as native, though 
brought up from Campania by one of the 
Licinian gens. So much during the later 
Republic did the Romans apply themselves 
to fructiculture that some ancient writers 
even go so far as to describe Italy,' as some 
have called England, one great orchard." 



FOOD ADULTERATION IN EUROPE. 

Consul-General Guenther, of Frankfort, is 
authority for the following : "An article on 
the adulteration of food products which is 
going the rounds of the German press states 
that an ordinary liver patty is made into 
fine 'Strassburger' pate de foie gras, or goose 
liver patty, by means of borax or salicylic 
acid and of finely chopped and cleverly dis- 
tributed pieces of black silk, representing 
truffles. 

"Cosmos, a German paper, guarantees the 
fact that under the label of canned lobsters 
the soft parts of cuttlefish and crabs are 
sold. 

"In Paris, snails are of late popular, and 
the adulterators mix them with lungs of 
cattle and horses. Even entirely artificial 
snails are manufactured. The shells, re- 
coated with fat and slime, are filled with 
lungs and then sold as Bergundy" snails. 

"Lovers of fresh rooster combs are im- 
posed on by a substitute cut out of hogs' 
intestines. 

"Chopped artificial truffles are made of 
black rubber, silk or softenea leather, and 
even whole truffles are made out of roasted 
potatoes, which are given a peculiar flavor 
by adding ether. They are said to sell well 4 . 

"Fish spoiled in spite of ice and borax is 
treated with salts of zinc, aluminum and 
other metals. Rubbing the fish with vase- 
line to give it a fresh look and coloring the 
gills with fresh blood or eosin — a coal tar 
color — are resorted to. The latter is also 



used to intensify the red color of inferior 
crabs. 

"Imparting a greenish color to oysters is 
another adulteration. An oyster requires 
about one month in the beds to acquire the 
greenish color. As this is too long a time, 
the dealers help them along with an artificial 
color. 

"The chemists in the Paris municipal la- 
boratories have shown that tomato jelly is 
adulterated with turnips, and powdered pep- 
per contains a large admixture of hard tack." 



VEGETARIANISM AND ITS EFFECTS ON 
HEALTH. 

Vegetarianism, in the opinion of a writer 
on the subject, can be called neither scien- 
tific nor practical. Man's digestive organs 
demand both vegetable and animal food, 
though existence, without regard to> perfect 
development, physical or mental, can be 
maintained for long periods on food that is 
unsuitable. All food compounds that are 
found in the animal kingdom are also found 
in the vegetable kingdom ; but the human 
organs can not assimilate the vegetable 
compounds with so much ease or thor- 
oughly as they can the animal compounds ; 
and if these be restricted to vegetable com- 
pounds, malnutrition follows. While the 
general health of some vegetarians may ap- 
pear good, bodily powers can' not be sus- 
tained for any length of time on a purely 
vegetable diet. To change from a mixed 
to a one sided diet necessitates years of 
gradual adaptation of digestive ferments 
and organs to the new diet. This gradual 
adaptation of system to diet could be se- 
cured, in time, more completely by some 
than by others ; but, at best, it would take 
• many generations to bring about such a 
change in the human system. Without 
doubt many of us eat too much animal food, 
but vegetarianism is not the remedy. 



FRUITLESS. 
I know a maid, she is a peach. 

With her I made a date ; 
She is the apple of mine eye, 

But here I sadly state 
She does not care a fig for me ; 

Alas, my cruel fate. 

The dainty maid has cherry lips 

And lemon-colored hair ; 
She wears a bright burnt-orange gown, 

But, ah, to my despair 
She will not answer yes to me, 

So we may be a "pear." 

— Chicago Chronicle. 



Mary had a little lamb, 

But that is nothing new. 
She's gone and bought another lamb 

And now she's got lamb stew. 

— New York Times. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



A TOP LINE LAUNCH. 

I have a small launch, built by the Fay 
& Bowen Engine Co., Geneva, N. Y., and 
fitted with one of their 3 horse power en- 
gines, which I have used 3 years, and some 
of your readers might like to hear about its 
behavior during its third season. Last 
spring I made a movable waterproof can- 
vas canopy and curtains for the boat. In 
the summer I took a trip to Wheeling, W. 
Va., in company with a friend, and made 
the round trip, 180 miles, in 5 days. We 
had a 16 foot skiff in tow, containing an oil 
stove, provisions and bedding. We slept on 
the launch every night. 

Coming home we had to stem a stiff cur- 
rent, as the locks on the Ohio river are not 
yet completed. In some places we had stiff 
rapids, but the launch took us through 
without any trouble. 

About 2 weeks later I went, in company 
with the same man, to Morgantown, W. 
Va., which is the head of navigation on the 
Monongahela river. The round trip was 
about 250 miles, from Sewickley, Pa., and 
we had the same skiff and load in tow. We 
made the round trip in 5 days and slept on 
the launch, as on the Wheeling trip. We 
used only 23 gallons of gasoline, and went 
through 13 government locks each way. 

I ran the launch over 1,000 miles last 
summer, in all stages of water, and had no 
trouble, but a lot of fun. The engine and 
boat are as good as new, except that the 
finish on the latter is slightly marred. The 
engine is a good one and full of business ; 
and the heavier the load the better she 
works. 

In locking through on the Monongahela 
river the easy handling and reliability of 
the engine were well demonstrated. When 
approaching a lock I would blow the horn, 
put the engine on slow speed and run the 
boat in a circle until the gates were opened ; 
then shoot into the lock and shut down. 
As soon as I received the signal that all 
was ready I would start the engine again 
and run out of the lock when the gate was 
opened. I never had the slightest trouble 
in starting the engine and never delayed 
the lock men a minute. They all compli- 
mented us highly on the handling of the 
boat, and said we gave them less trouble 
than anything they ever put through. They 
were somewhat amused at the small size of 
the boat, for the skiff load of freight which 
we were towing looked nearly as big as the 
boat. They showed us as much courtesy as 
they did the largest steamboat on the 
river. 

James C. McCormick, Jr., Pittsburg, Pa. 



STEEL MOTOR BOATS. 

W. H. Mullins, the boat builder, of Sa- 
lem, Ohio, must certainly work nights. He 
is always doing something new. Few of 
his products get in view of Recreation 
readers. They go out into the busy world 
through other channels and are in daily 
use by thousands of people. 

Mullins steel ducking boats are staples 
wherever the ducks drop in, and now, in 
order to keep up with the trend of modern 
progress, Mr. Mullins has put on the mar- 
ket a steel motor boat which is sure to be 
a winner. One of these is called the Beav- 
er Tail, and is, without doubt, the record 
boat of the world for a 21-footer. It has 
exceeded a speed of 15 miles an hour in 
shallow water and with a temporary ar- 
rangement of the engine. It is believed 
that under different circumstances and with 
a well-regulated and well-equipped engine 
this boat would run 16 to 17 miles an hour. 
Such speed is phenomenal for so small a 
boat. 

These steel motor boats are bound to prove 
popular. If there is anything the boatman 
grows weary of it is a boat that is con- 
stantly leaking. Steel boats are always 
watertight and secure. By a special ar- 
rangement the engine is so placed that the 
vibration of the engine is taken up by the 
frame work and is not communicated to the 
hull of the boat. Not only this but the 
new steel boat will weigh not over one-half 
as much as the ordinary wooden boat of 
the same size. Mr. Mullins is counting on 
a great trade in these boats, and is building 
a special factory in which to build them. 



NEW H. & R. PRINTING. • 
Harrington & Richardson, Worcester, 
Mass., have put out their 1905 calendar, 
and it is very attractive. The artist has 
given us a pretty girl, pretty enough to eat, 
dressed in hunting togs and equipped with 
one of Harrington & Richardson's single 
barrel guns. She is sitting on a bench, evi- 
dently thinking over some good sport she 
has had, because she wears a smile that 
won't come off. Her companion is an Eng- 
lish setter, no doubt of blue blood stock, 
and he looks as happy as any lucky dog 
would be in such company. 

This calendar is a genuine ornament to 
any office or house, and every sportsman 
should have a copy of it. Harrington & 
Richardson will send a copy free of 
charge if you will ask for it and mention 
Recreation. H. & R. know how to get up 
attractive printed matter relating to guns 
and revolvers, too. Their latest is a new 
catalogue showing all the different models 



129 



130 



RECREATION. 



of goods they make, and the information 
and the pictures are put out in a very catch- 
ing way. 

These people are now making an excel- 
lent line of revolvers, and persons in- 
terested in the problem of getting a high 
grade revolver at a moderate price should 
consult this catalogue. In writing for it 
please mention Recreation. 



LEGAL LIFE OF A RAILROAD TICKET. 

A decision as to the life of a railroad 
ticket, which is attracting considerable at- 
tention, has been rendered in favor of the 
Southern Pacific Company by the Civil 
Court of Appeals at San Antonio, Texas. 
The court has decided that a railroad ticket 
which is not used within a reasonable time 
after issuance,, is barred by the statute of 
limitation. The case arose out of the sale 
of a ticket by the Southern Pacific on April 
29, 1885. The ticket was for a trip from 
Houston to San Antonio. The man who 
bought it died without using it. Fifteen 
years later it was sold. Late in 1899 it was 
offered to a Southern Pacific conductor. 
The latter refused to accept it and the man 
refusing to pay his fare was ejected. There 
was nothing irregular in the ticket or in its 
purpose and transfer. In deciding against 
the man in his damage suit for ejectment, 
the court holds that "it was never contem- 
plated that the ticket should be held for 
nearly half of an average lifetime before it 
was presented for the purpose for which it 
was purchased. The ticket held by the ap- 
pellant could not occupy anv better posi- 
tion as to the statute of limitation than a 
promissory note payable on demand." . 



A SYMPHONY IN GRAY. p 

In the 1905 Calendar of N. W. Ayer & 
Son, the Philadelphia Advertising Aegents, 
a color scheme in grays and white is worked 
out so harmoniously as to merit the above 
title. 

On the background of gun metal gray 
cover paper is developed in lighter tones 
their well-known medal trade mark and 
motto, "Keeping Everlastingly at it Brings 
Success" ; the latter being the predominant 
feature of the design. 

The calendar is 14 by 28 inches, and de- 
signed for office or library. The figures are 
large and, being printed in white, stand out 
clearly across a large room. 

Whether the popularity of Ayer & Son's 
calendars is due to the uniformly tasteful 
design, to their utility, or to the epigrams 
on advertising and business building which 
fill the blanks left on the flaps, it is hard to 
say, but they have enjoyed a steady sale for 
years at 25 cents each ; for this sum, which 
barely covers cost and postage, the 1905 
edition may be had as long as it lasts. 



In sending for it please mention Recrea- 
tion. 

United States Senator John F. Dryden, 
President- of The Prudential Insurance 
Company of America, has issued in book 
form his recent address before the Boston 
Life Underwriters' Association, on the 
"Regulation of Insurance by Congress." 

Following the official recognition given 
this matter by President Roosevelt in his 
last message to Congress, the speech of 
President Dryden is especially interesting, 
presenting, as it does, the views of the con- 
trolling head of a large life insurance com- 
pany. Senator Dryden's views are in har- 
mony with those of the President. 

Among other things Mr. Dryden says: 
"I hope the time is not far distant when, 
as a permanent relief from the needless 
and increasing burdens of over supervision, 
over legislation and over taxation, and as 
an additional security for the protection of 
our policy holders, we shall have an act of 
Congress regulating insurance between the 
States." 



MAP OF NEW YORK CITY. 
The passenger department of the New 
York Central & Hudson River Railroad has 
just issued an interesting and useful map 
of New York City, embracing the bay, 
Hudson, East and Harlem rivers. It shows 
an area of 4 miles from Grand Central Sta- 
tion in every direction. The names and lo- 
cation of yy hotels are given; also, the 
names and location of 78 clubs and 49 
theatres. The piers of the various lines of 
steamships are distinctly marked, as well" as 
the numerous large and small parks located 
in various parts of Greater New York. The 
map is most valuable to strangers visiting 
the "Wonder City," and can be obtained by 
sending a 2-cent stamp to George H. Dan- 
iels, General Passenger Agent, Grand Cen- 
tral Station, New York City, and mention- 
ing Recreation. 

West End Furniture Co., 

Williamsport, Pa. 
Dear Sirs : — The gun cabinet arrived and 
is a beautiful piece of furniture, much finer 
than I expected. Now that I have it, I 
fully realize the value of a gun cabinet to 
every sportsman. 

Yours truly 

E. M. Storm. 



At Nashville Cumberland Park Traps, 
Capt. Andrew Meaders, shooting the Park- 
er gun, broke 99 out of 100 ; a remarkable 
performance. Mr. Meaders continued 
shooting after the event was finished, to 
warm up his Old Reliable, breaking 25 
more straight, making a total of 124 out 
of 125. 



HAVE YOU? 



CLEMENT VORE. 



To Eastern anglers who have never felt 
the exhilaration that results from the hook- 
ing of a wily muskalonge, I desire to tell 
my story in a series of questions. If you 
think you have such fishing in your lakes 
and streams, come to Wisconsin, show your 
ignorance and enjoy real sport. 

Have you worked all year steadily until 
your nerve was gone and you spoke only 
monosyllables to your wife? Have you 
fondled your fishing tackle and looked re- 
proachfully out on the snow through your 
murky window panes? Have you felt a 
longing for you know not what? Have you 
watched the snow disappear and the grass 
grow green and the policemen put on the 
new, light uniforms that betoken spring? 

Have you made love anew to your wife 
until she promised to let you fish for mus- 
kies in June? Have you anticipated all 
these things so long that every time you 
passed beneath a stuffed musky hanging on 
a wall you felt goose pimples coming out 
on your flesh? 

Have you at last nestled down in a rail- 
road coach and felt the rails bumping along 
behind you? Have you gone into the woods 
of Wisconsin where occasionally you saw 
a vast stretch of stump land speaking of the 
devastation of the axe? Have you seen the 
spots of green on the hillside and the old 
pines tinged with the yellow green of the 
virgin needle ? Have your thoughts run 
rampant until the milk of human kindness 
made your whole soul glad? 

Have you met your guide and gone to his 
house, made of logs and smeared with mud, 
to meet his wife and children? 

Have you smelled the breath of pine and 
listened to the choir of spring frogs singing 
among the new rushes? 

Have, you shown your new tackle to your 
guide and made his heart glad with a gift 
along the same lines? 

Have you inspected the boat and tucked 
away the genial bottle in the stern and set 
the bow of the boat out to the bar? 

Have you felt the spoon twist as the line 
ran out and you were at last trolling? Have 



you trolled for an hour and caught one 
little pickerel, and, just begun to have all 
the idealism vanish from your soul, when 
you felt a vicious lunge on your line and 
saw the look on your guide's face? 

Have you settled yourself just right and 
begun to reel in? Have you fought 12 min- 
utes, finally to see behind the boat, say 25 
feet, the huge head of a musky bob ud, 
while a glimmer came from your spoon? 

Have you seen the fish roll his eyes, lash 
his body and spread his gills until he looked 
like a bull dog? 

Have you felt the uncertainty of the 
struggle as you got him close alongside and 
felt the boat settle as the guide moved over 
by your side to sink the gaff into the hidden 
belly? 

Have you seen the awful contortions and 
struggles as the musky writhed to free him- 
self of the hook just before the gaff entered 
him? 

Have you seen him pulled into the boat 
and viewed him lash around until the hunt- 
ing knife severed his vertebrae? 

Have you talked incessantly to your guide 
for an hour after and forever after never 
knew what vou or he said? 

Have you noticed how bright the day 
then grew and how intensely beautiful was 
the shore line? 

Have you rowed home almost too early 
and dispatched the following wire to your 
wife : 

"Have just landed 35-pound musky. Tell 
Jones about it." 

Have you ever slept so well as that night ? 
Have you returned to work thoroughly 
rested after having spent 2 weeks in the 
woods and caught 8 fish? 

Have you scorned the bass and looked 
down on the pickerel and wall eyed pike? 

If you have done all this you have done 
more than I. I am, body and soul, brain 
and brawn, the lover of a good, old, wilv, 
fighting bass; the best .fish that swims, 
pound for pound. I never caught a musky 
in my life. 



A camera fiend of Vincennes 
Attempted to photo some hennes, 
He was nearly distrait 
When he looked at the plate — 
He forgot to uncover the lennes. 

131 



ANOTHER WARNING TO FLORIDA. 



I have read with great interest the graphic 
and accurate paper of- Dr. Curtis in your 
December number, entitled "A Warning to 
Florida," and can testify to its truthfulness 
from personal observation* 

I wish through your magazine to sound 
another warning in behalf of the fish and 
game of Florida. When I first began to go 
to that State, in the winter of 1875, the fish- 
ing was excellent, thought as I was told, 
not nearly so good as it had once been. 
Since that time I have visited Florida every 
winter, staying 3 weeks to 3 months, and 
have seen the game and fish gradually 
diminish in numbers, till now the 
fishing, from a sportsman's standpoint, is 
poor, except for tarpon late in the season, 
say in June or July. 

Even so late in the season as July, in 
1904, I was unable in Sarosota bay to catch 
more than 2 or 3 fish in several hours, 
though I tried it' repeatedly. 

The cause for this is apparent to the most 
superficial observer. It is due to the fact 
that the fish have practically no protection 
from rapacious fishermen, who catch great 
and small fishes in nets, often a mile or so 
long. I have seen seines run entirely 
around a small island and then drawn up to 
shore, killing everything within their com- 
pass, great and small. 

It is a common practice to run a seine, 
there called a stop net, across the mouth of 
a bayou at high tide and then catch practi- 
cally all the fish in the bayou when they 
emerge as the tide ebbs. 

It is astonishing that the people of Flo- 
rida do not see how inimical these practices 



are to their real interests. So soon as it is 
once understood that the legitimate sport 
of fishing can not be advantageously pur- 
sued in Florida, many tourists and all the 
fishermen who fish for sport and not for 
profit will go elsewhere where the fish 
are protected. This - policy, I fear, will 
awaken the people of Florida to their 
danger too late to remedy the loss, and after 
the State is no longer visited by seekers 
for legitimate sport. Interested parties may 
deny the facts above stated, but so far as 
it relates to the places I have visited, 
notably Sarocota bay, they can not be suc- 
cessfully controverted. 

The same remarks will apply to game 
and birds of plumage. There is much bet- 
ter sport farther North, and birds of plum- 
age are notable by their absence. Even the 
pelicans and alligators are becoming, rela- 
tively, few in numbers, and I am sorry to 
say that Northern tourists are not free 
from blame for this condition. The brutal 
lust for blood is so universal that these 
birds and reptiles are killed merely for 
sport, though they are worthless as food 
and rarely bought for their plumage or 
skins. The people of Florida should at 
once enact a strict law for the protection of 
their fish, game and birds and enforce it by 
severe penalties against residents and tour- 
ists alike. If this is done soon, conditions 
will improve in the course of a few years ; 
if it is not done, not only will the State 
lose some of its principal attractions, but 
an important source of revenue will be for- 
ever lost. 

M. D. Ewell, M.D., Chicago. 



WITH A STOCK COMPANY. 

It was a proud and happy day 
When Russell Crane Salvini Gray 

Joined a flock 
Of actor folk, a real stock troupe ; 
Yes, he was taken in the group 
With the stock. 

They started West without delay, 
And Russell Crane Salvini Gray 

Wore a frock — 
A lovely coat — with conscious air, 
Rejoicing greatly to be there 

With the stock. 



They busted out near Santa Fe 
And Russell Crane Salvini Gray, 

Who couldn't hock 
His clothes at anything like par, 
Came home inside a cattle car 

With the stock. 

— Louisville Courier- Journal 

132 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



SHALL THE PRICE OF RECREATION BE 
ADVANCED ? 

Herewith I enclose check for $2 for which 
continue my subscription to Recreation 
as long as the amount will pay for. Should 
you raise the price of Recreation I shall 
certainly continue to take it. Ten years 
ago I saw your advertisement in a cat- 
alogue of Henry C. Squires & Sons and I 
sent for a sample copy of Recreation, 
At the same time I sent for 3 other sports- 
men's periodicals. It was the December, 
1894, number of Recreation I received and 
I was so well pleased with it that I sent 
you my subscription; also for copies of 
October and November previous, and from 
then I have received and read every copy of 
Recreation with great pleasure. 

I heartily endorse the work you are doing 
and am sorry to hear of your losing the 
ads. of some companies that I think should 
be helping in the work of protecting game, 
for without game there would be little use 
for such goods. 

I have never been a hog, even before I 
read Recreation. While a mere boy it was 
a pleasure to me to go to the woods just to 
watch the squirrels gather nuts, but there is 
no game here now. All my hunts are taken 
in Recreation and in dreams. No true 
sportsman would object to the price of 
Recreation being doubled or trebled. Just 
think, for $10, how much pleasure I have 
had the last 10 years. 

In time to come you will long be remem- 
bered as the beginner of game protection, 
and true lovers of the field, forest and 
stream would be glad to erect a monument 
to your memory, though I hope your days 
will be long in the land that you may see 
the results of your good work and see those 
who are against you now become your fol- 
lowers before the end. 

J. O. Evans, Paris, Ky. 

On the field of battle, would you desert 
your brother, or your captain? 

Has not G. O. Shields been the leader of 
all true sportsmen for years past? He has 
stood for moderation in killing game; for 
good laws ; for the preservation of game 
and game fishes ; for non sale of game ; 
for a bag limit and against the deadly auto- 
matic and pump guns ; against sneak boats ; 
against night shooting ; and all this to the 
detriment of the business interests of Rec- 
reation. Selfish people, who really hate to 
leave a bird in the field or a fish in the 
stream, have damned Shields right and left. 

By his crusade he has lost the friendship 
of the game hogs and the advertising of 
many of the gun and ammunition makers. 



G. O. Shields has done more for game 
and fish protection than all the other sports- 
men and all the game protective associations 
combined. 

Now, all friends of this great cause 
should rally to the front and extend a help- 
ing hand to our leader. By all means ad- 
vance Recreation to $2, and let us double 
its circulation within the next year. 

Jean Allison, 
State Game Warden, Jerome, Ariz. 

I have read in Recreation that you are 
undecided whether to raise the subscription 
price or not. Count me a subscriber until 
your price exceeds my income, as no other 
publication gives me the pleasure that I 
derive from Recreation. Your ads are 
more interesting than the literature in other 
periodicals, and your attacks on game hogs 
are above par. 

Thanks to Recreation, I bought a .303 
Savage last fall, which has proven the su- 
perior of any other rifle I have ever tried. 
When writing the Savage Arms Co. I gave 
you credit for my selection. 

I am interested in, "Can a bullet be seen 
in flight?" Several years ago I owned a 
.22 rifle, and on a cool, clear day, shot at a 
hawk, perched on a top branch of a high 
tree. Having as a background a snow 
white cloud, I distinctly saw the bullet as 
it passed through the air to the right of the 
hawk. 

John F. Goode, Cadillac, Mich. 

December copy of Recreation received. 
It is the finest specimen of sportsmen's 
periodical it has been my good lot to see. 
The Gun and Ammunition Department is 
Ai ; just what it should be, every time. I 
also read with delight the numerous re- 
marks concerning the shot gun, repeating 
and automatic. 

Twenty cents is a small price indeed for 
such a treat as this last issue, or any other, 
for that matter. After a hard day's work 
in a close, grimy city office it is a glorious 
refreshment to read a copy of Recreation. 
Russell G. Pond. Winchester, Mass. 

I have just received the December issue 
of your splendid magazine and have read 
it with deep interest. I noticed the edito- 
rial, "Shall the Price of Recreation be ad- 
vanced?" wherein you ask the views of your 
subscribers on the subject. I, for one, will 
support Recreation regardless of any ad- 
vance in price. Recreation is the best 
magazine published, and I have $5 for a 
yearly subscription any day, if need be. 
L. W. Weismann, Shawnee, Okla. 

I see in December Recreation that for 



133 



134 



RECREATION. 



reasons good and sufficient you are going to 
raise the price of Recreation to $2 a year. 
I have read Recreation for the past 5 years 
and I admire the way you have handled the 
fish and game hogs. Keep up the good 
work, and every true sportsman in the coun- 
try will stay with you, even if you have to 
charge $5 a copy for Recreation. 

G. C. Goddard, Harmony, Utah. 

I noticed in December Recreation your 
note as to raising the price of the maga- 
zine from $1 to $2 a year. This is a good 
field ; plenty of sportsmen of all kinds, and 
I feel sure every one of them will be will- 
ing to pay $2 a year for Recreation. I 
expect to get up a club of not less than 50. 
I can do it easily. 

H. C. Metcalf, Dennison, Ohio. 

I admire the stand you have taken in the 
interest of our game. You have done more 
for its protection than any other man in 
the United States. The December number 
of Recreation is worth 2 of any other 
sportsmen's periodicals I have seen, and 
you would be entirely justified in doubling 
trie price. 

C. T. Lemon, Uneva, W. Va. 

I see in the December number that you 
speak of advancing the price of Recrea- 
tion. I have often wondered how you 
could sell the magazine for 10 cents, and I 
can readily understand how you are. at last 
compelled to advance the price. I shall 
continue to read Recreation just the same. 
A. Moore, Anderson, Ind. 

I am in favor of the advance to $2 on. 
Recreation and with you in your war on 
the pump and automatic guns and on the 
game hog. 

Don't cease to give it to the idafer who 
prefers market hunting to an honest liveli- 
hood. 

George S. Hale, Chardon, Ohio. 

I am in hearty sympathy with your fight 
against game hogs and pump and automatic 
guns, and I admire your spirit in sticking 
to the fight to the end. I shall take Recrea- 
tion regularly at $2 a year. Please find en- 
closed draft for $2 for a year's subscription. 
Walter Blount, Evansville, Ind. 

In regard to your notice in December 
Recreation of the possibility of the price 
being raised, I for one am willing to pay 
for a good thing, and expect to be a con- 
tinuous subscriber to Recreation for an in- 
definite period, even at an advanced price. 
Geo. F. Mims, Edgefield, S. C. 

In regard to raising the price of Recrea- 
tion, I am in favor of $2 a year. Recrea- 
tion is worth it. The article in the De- 
cember number in regard to reloading full 



charge smokeless powder shells is alone 
worth the price of the magazine. 

J. W. Hurlbut, Milford, Cal. 

I approve of your purpose to increase the 
price of Recreation from $1 to $2 a year. 
It certainly is worth more than $1, and I 
fail to see how you can afford to furnish it 
at that price. I shall most cheerfully pay 
$2 if that is to be the price. 

George W. Geiser, Easton, Pa. 

I see you are thinking of raising the price 
of Recreation. Let it be raised, for Recrea- 
tion is worth twice what it now costs us, 
and there will be just as many takers as 
ever. 

T. S. Hollister, Sparta, Wis. 

I note that you intend to raise the sub- 
scription of your magazine. I do not think 
$2 a year too much for it, and I believe 
your other friends will say the same. 

M. L. Michael, North Watergap, Pa. 

You .ought to raise the price of Recrea- 
tion. It is worth more than $1, and I 
would not miss it if it cost $3 a year. 

R. G. Messinger, Easton, Pa. 



A CALIFORNIA HOT AIR MACHINE. 

In April last I received a letter from Wil- 
lits, Cal., signed "A Friend," which gave a 
Munchausenlike story of the slaughter of 
deer by one Harry Flinn. Although the let- 
ter bore the earmarks of falsehood from 
start to finish, I thought it worth while to 
investigate, so I wrote the alleged Flinn, 
asking him whether the report of his deer 
killing exploits was true. He replied 
promptly that it was, but his letter also bore 
ample evidence of being a pack of lies. It 
was easy to read between the lines of both 
communications that they were written by 
one and the same man, and that there was 
scarcely a word of truth in either of them. 

However, I wanted positive proof as to 
the identity of the man who wrote the let- 
ters, and I referred them to a friend in 
California, with the request that he inves- 
tigate. He did so, and now writes me that 
he is satisfied both letters were written by 
J. U. Gillespey, of Willits. 

This man Gillespey, therefore, stands con- 
victed before the public as being one of the 
most shameless liars I have ever known, 
and if he does not like this sort of record 
he is at liberty to seek redress in any way 
he may choose. 



There are 2 game hogs in Mt. Clemens, 
Mich., namely, W. E. Sutherland and his 
wife, who, it is asserted, went to West 
Branch last fall, killed 790 ruffed grouse 
and shipped them to Mt. Clemens, where 
they were sold. A League member in Mt. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



135 



Clemens tells me this pair goes to some 
Northern county every fall, that they shoot 
grouse throughout the entire season and 
ship them to market. Unfortunately, there 
is no law in Michigan that will reach 
these people. The only way to punish 
them would be by mob law. I do not 
believe in that, as a rule, but I do believe 
it would be right for the sportsmen of 
whatever community Sutherland lands in 
next fall to treat him to a coat of tar and 
feathers and then dump him in the nearest 
mud hole. Possibly he and his wife might 
then take the hint and let up. 



Buyers of extracts, essences, toilet waters, 
etc., should purchase well known brands 
that have a standard of quality. 



Deputy Game Warden P. M. Wark, of 
Harrison, Idaho, is making an enviable 
reputation for himself as a game protector. 
Some months ago he arrested C. L. Brick- 
ells, owner of Brickells' island, in Spirit 
lake, for hunting deer with dogs in violation 
of law. Brickell put up a gauzy plea to 
the effect that he was hunting cougar in- 
stead of deer, but it did not go with Judge 
Wilson and he fined Brickell $150 and costs. 
It seems that during the time when Game 
Warden Wark was seeking evidence against 
Brickell, 2 of the latter's dogs were shot 
and killed in the woods while trailing deer, 
and it is safe to guess that Warden Wark 
knows who killed them. His example is 
one that every game warden should follow. 



Another side hunt and fishing contest was 
held in November in Meadville, Pa., and 
lasted 2 weeks. One branch of the herd 
was captained by W. G. Harper and the 
other by F. G. Prenatt. Among the fishes 
and animals sought by these butchers were 
green bass, which counted 2 points to the 
pound ; black bass, 3 points ; wall eyed pike, 

4 points ; grouse, 10 points ; grey squirrels, 

5 points; ducks, 5 points, and mud hens, 1 
point. 

A banquet was provided at the expense of 
the losing side, and if the crowd had had its 
just deserts the food would have consisted 
of swill, served in a trough where every 
participant would have been required to in- 
sert his snout and feed like any other hog. 



Recent revelations as to the uses to which 
wood alcohol is put are astounding. Within 
the last 60 days 70 samples of witch hazel 
have been bought from as many wholesale 
and retail drug stores in 7 different cities, 
all of which have been carefully analyzed, 
with the result that 52 showed the presence 
of wood alcohol or formaldehyde, or both. 
In other words, 52 samples were shown to 
contain deadly poison, and only 18 were 
free from poisonous ingredients. 



A friend on Long Island wrote me some- 
time ago advocating the repeal of the Brown 
anti-spring duck shooting bill, and signed 
his letter "Old Subscriber." If he had 
given me his real name I should have been 
glad to print the article, but under the rules 
it went into the waste basket. . It is not 
necessary that a contributor's name should 
be made public, but it is necessary that it 
be known in this office. It takes a large 
waste basket to hold all the anonymous 
communications that come to this office 
every day. 



"Bridge Developments" is the name of a 
little book written by Edmund Robertson 
and A. H. Wollaston and published by 
Brentano's, of y New York. At first sight 
the title might suggest the construction of 
steel bridges, across rivers and things ; but 
such is not the theme of the authors. It 
is a treatise on the game of bridge, 
and is an excellent work in every respect. 
If, therefore, you are fond of the game or 
if you wish to learn it and to master it, you 
should study this book carefully. It sells 
at $1.25, postage paid. 



A number of Canadian friends have re- 
cently sent me newspaper clippings report- 
ing the extensive slaughter and shipment 
of deer, from various points in Ontario and 
Quebec, to Montreal and other markets. I 
trust this exhibition of greed on the part 
of market hunters and game dealers may 
have so disgusted the sportsmen of these 
Provinces that they will soon secure the 
enactment of laws, to prohibit the sale of 
game. This is the only way to stop the 
slaughter. 



There is a movement on foot in Michi- 
gan to secure the passage of a law prohibit- 
ing the killing of quail for 2 years. In 
fact, some of the sportsmen claim that the 
close season should be made longer than 
this, and it seems to be the consensus of 
opinion that a rest should be given the little 
birds in order to prevent their complete 
extermination. The sentiment is an excel- 
lent one, and I earnestly hope every sports- 
man in Michigan will support this measure 
heartily. 



I have been informed that certain people 
are engaged in canning catfish and stur- 
geon; that fnese fish are stained, labeled 
"salmon" and sold as such. Does any read- 
er of Recreation know of the existence of 
any such fishery? If so, will he kindly give 
me full particulars? 



136 



RECREATION. 



HOW BUSINESS MEN LOCATE 
SPORTSMEN. 

"Yes, I know," said a gun manufacturer 
recently, "the general idea of a business 
such as mine is that it conducts itself; but 
as a matter of fact we do proportionately 
about one hundred times more hustling for 
an order than a small dealer would. We do 
it systematically, though, whereas he does 
it in a haphazard way. 

"Of course we can sell guns only to peo- 
ple who wish to use them. Sportsmen 
want guns, so we go after sportsmen. 
Merchants as a class do not want guns, so 
we do not go after them especially. 

"We need the name and address of every 
sportsman in America. More than this, we 
want new people who use guns, and we 
must reach them ahead of our competitors. 
How to do this was a puzzler. We worked 
over the thought for months. Finally, a 
man came along and said, 'Why don't you 
ask Burrelle?' 

"That was a new one on us. We didn't 
know who Burrelle was or what to ask 
him. However, we soon located him all 
right. He's the Dean of press clippers. 
He occupies the whole of that historic old 
Fremont building down in 19th street. 

"We asked Burrelle what he could do 
for us, and he settled the whole business. 
We had been planning to have agents in 
every county in the country, and had fig- 
ured on spending about $20,000 to get new 
names. Burrelle put us on a way to get 
them, and we are getting them now, at a 
cost so low that I'm afraid to mention it. 

"Here's the basis of the idea. Sports- 
men abound in country districts." One can 
scarcely pick up a country paper without 
seeing a paragraph 'John Smith ^has gone 
on a shooting trip down the lake,' or 'Tom 
Brown is getting up a party to organize a 
gun club.' There you are. Get all the 
country papers, clip out those items, and 
you have your names. 

"It's a great idea ; but suppose we tried 
to buy all the country papers! We would 
be up against a $50,000 idea right away. 
That is where Burrelle comes in. He has 
a force that reads day by day every news- 
paper published in America. We gave him 
an order to clip out and send us every 
mention of a sportsman. Then each day 
as we get the items we let those sportsmen 
know where they can buy good guns. 

"It costs a few cents a day. Burrelle has 
the experience, the system. He is deliver- 
ing us the goods, and we are making money 
out of them. 

"What Burrelle has done for us he can 
do for any business, or any individual. He 
can tell people in any line where to sell 
goods. Take the man who has photo- 
graphic outfits to sell. Burrelle can keep 
him posted as to everyone who intends to 
take a trip anywhere. If you wish to do 
new business in a new way, try Burrelle." 



THE MOVEMENT FOR CLEAN 
MONEY. 

The growing demand for a more whole- 
some and decent paper currency is a health- 
ful tendency. This is an antiseptic age; an 
age of cleanliness. In the realms of path- 
ology it is the era of germ discovery and 
annihilation; in domestic affairs it is an era 
of soap and water, plentifully provided and 
industriously applied. To checkmate the 
microbe has been the diligent endeavor of 
modern medicine and surgery; to promote 
that virtue which is justly extolled as next 
in rank to godliness is a tribute to ad- 
vancing civilization. 

Yet our government permits the people 
throughout 7/% of the entire republic to 
handle paper currency that is disreputable 
in its dirt and is a menace to the public 
health as well as a disgrace to the nation 
whose seal of verification and guaranty it 
bears. 

There might be some excuse for this if 
there were no remedy; but there is a rem- 
edy. The proposed post-check currency 
would provide adequate means for the re- 
turn and re-issue of these small bills sev- 
eral times every year, not only without ex- 
pense to the government but yielding a pro- 
fit, and extending to the remotest points of 
the nation its beneficial effects. This post- 
check money system, it will be remembered, 
provides that every $1, $2 and $5 bill shall 
have on its face blank spaces to be written 
in when the holder desires to send a bill by 
mail in lieu of stamps, coins, and small 
money orders now employed for that pur- 
pose. A part of the scheme is that a bill 
once used as a check is immediately retired 
from circulation, destroyed as mutilated 
currency, and re-issued. This would keep 
a constant flow of crisp, new bills from the 
press to the hands of the people. 

Thus the post-check would furnish an 
ideal jmedium for small remittances, and 
would provide clean money throughout the 
country. Health and decency combine to 
denounce the filth our currency carries. 

The inventor of this many sided scheme 
of public utility has not only assigned his 
patents to the government without asking 
any recompense, but he has expended with- 
out hope of reward many thousands of dol- 
lars in legitimate agitation for the adoption 
of the invention. 



Smiggs — There goes a man who has done 
much to arouse the people. 

Smaggs — Great labor agitator, eh? 

Smiggs — No ; manufacturer of alarm 
clocks. — Chicago Ledger. 



"I was out with my automobile 8 hours 
yesterday." 

"You were in the machine that long?" # 
"No. I was in it an hour and under it 
1 7 hours fixing the breaks."— Chicago News. 



RECREATION. 



137 



Greatest Gains 



IN 



Progress— Strength— Usefulness 



1904 a Record Year 



FOR 



The 




Tlie Vast Increases in the 
Company's Business Place 
it in a Stronger Position, 
Financially and Otherwise, 
Than Ever Before in its 
History, and Demonstrate 
the Public Approval of The 
Prudential's Broad Sys- 
tem of Life Insurance for 
the Whole Family. 

A Statement of the Mag- 
nificent Gains of Last 
Year Will Be Published 
in the March Magazines. 



Write for Information of Profit-Sharing Policies 
for any Member of your Family. Dept. 92 




The Prudential Insurance Co. 

OF AMERICA 

INCORPORATED AS A STOCK COMPANY BY THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY 
JOHN F. DRYDEN, President. Home Office, NEWARK, N. J. 



138 



RECREATION. 



FIRST VENISON IN CAMP. ~> 

One morning in November, I met a friend 
on the street and the conversation that en- 
sued landed me, together with 4 others, in- 
cluding a guide, on the shore of Moose- 
head lake 3 days later; quick time consid- 
ering the distance, nearly 1,000 miles. Of 
course it took some hustling, but with such 
an incentive as a hunt in the big woods of 
the pine tree State, it gives much pleasure 
to throw a pair of blankets, a hunting suit, 
a rifle and other camp essentials into a 
chest. This we did, telegraphing our guide 
to meet our train on its arrival. The trip 
itself is a pleasure not to be forgotten, be- 
sides the varied scenery. 

Our tickets read via Cleveland, Buffalo, 
Albany, Boston, Portland, Bangor and 
Greenville, Maine, where we arrived at 8.30 
p. m. 

We spent one night at a hotel in Green- 
ville, on the shore of the lake. With day- 
light came the work of provisioning the 
camp. That accomplished, we boarded the 
little boat and steamed, 25 miles ud the 
smooth waters of Moosehead lake to our 
camp. We landed by canoe, our cabin be- 
ing but a dozen rods up the shore, and 
soon had a fire crackling in the old stove 
of which the cabin boasted. The cabin, 
14x15, contained a table, a bench, and 3 
wooden bunks, which we filled with fresh 
pine boughs. Add 5 men, 3 chests and pro- 
visions, and room was scarce ; but we 
crowded a carload of fun into it besides. 

We were not on shore half an hour until 
each man, armed with his favorite large or 
small bore rifle and instructions from the 
guide about the inadvisability' of shooting 
one another, was slipping quietly up the old 
tote road, 2 going one way and 2 the other. 
My friend and I had reached the end of a 
small road leading off the main tote, and 
having arrived without making anv noise 
were discussing the advisability of turning 
back, when I suggested that we walk into 
the forest a short distance either way. I 
selected the left, picked my way carefully 
to a log and mounted it when, to my sur- 
prise, 2 deer jumped up from the other side, 
sprang into the undergrowth and disap- 
peared in an instant. I had not even time 
to discharge my gun into the air. I yelled 
for my companion and after I had made 
several attempts to describe the enormous 
size of the deer he diagnosed my case as 
buck fever. 

That night, with no venison in camp, we 
mapped out our trip, with the assistance of 
the guide, for the morrow; but the morrow 
came and went and we ate a bacon and 
flapjack breakfast the third day. I lost all 
hope of ever seeing another deer, much less 
of killing one, and about 4 o'clock in the 
afternoon I trained my gun on a ruffed 
grouse, awakening the forest with the re- 
port. I then started for camp a mile dis- 
tant, securing another grouse on the way 
in. We had potpie that night, but it was a 
dejected crowd that climbed into those 
bunks. Five men 3 days in the Maine 



woods and nothing but ruffed grouse for 
the inner man ! The wonderful stories of 
the wonderful numbers of deer to be found 
in the wonderful forests of Maine began to 
seem wonderful indeed. 

The morning of the fourth day we break- 
fasted before daylight and each man went 
his way alone. My route was the old tote 
road. I walked slowly, making no noise, 
for 2 hours, keeping at my work with grim 
determination, when suddenly I heard a 
queer, crackling noise in the forest off to 
my left. Instantly I paused, breathless and 
excited; my eyes followed the direction of 
the disturbance, and I scarcely dared to 
breathe for fear of frightening the game. 
Presently I saw something moving through 
the undergrowth, and was about to shoot, 
when it occurred to me that it might be 
one of my companions. I withheld my fire, 
and the next instant a big buck stepped out 
into full view not 60 yards distant. As I 
drew my gun to my shoulder he scented me 
and threw his head up in a graceful pose. 
I fired, aiming at his right shoulder. He 
dropped; unable to rise, and kept his head 
swaying from side to side. I ran forward, 
whipped out my hunting knife, approached 
and struck the deer back of his shoulder. 
He rose to his fore feet and swung toward 
me. Strangely enough, I did not lose my 
head, but managed to get out of the way, 
and then I struck him again, that time in 
the heart. As his beautiful eyes turned 
skyward, remorse came over me, and I felt 
like a murderer. The agonized look in the 
innocent eyes of that animal will live in my 
memory always. 

The venison was welcome in camp, for 
it was the first, and though we stayed 2 
weeks we got but one deer each. I shall 
go again, but not for deer. The next time 
I shall hunt for bear, moose or wildcats. 
I can never again take the life of such a 
beautiful and harmless creature as a deer. 
C. C. Eckfeld, Marion, O. 



A CHANGE OF FACE. 
(Dean Lefroy, in denouncing the devo- 
tees of bridge, says "their faces grow hard 
and expressionless.") 
Her eyes that seemed twin stars to pierce 

The golden cloud that was her hair 
Now turn upon me with a fierce 

Glare. 

The ripe red lips so finely cut, 

To look upon them was delight, 
Are pallid now and always shut 

Tight. 

Where rose and lily once did dwell 

Her cheeks are now quite worn and thin ; 
She looks, too, older since they fell 

In. 

Her brow is seamed with many a ridge, 

Her mien is sordid, grasping, base ; 
In fact, she's suffering from bridge 

Face. 
— Tatler. 



RECREATION. 



39 









Pk^- : ' : \ 



THE . 



Miffl 



J.WALEXANDEBl 

president 



HENRY B.HYDE 

FOUNDER 



TTS»A- ."••••■ • 



HARNESS 
THE POWER* 

Why not utilize that 
part of your income now 
going to waste ? w 
By taking an Endowment 
policy in the Equitable^ 
you will protect 5^ptir 
family and provide For 
your ownmature years. 



Splendid opportunities fornten ol ' character taacvas representatives. 
Write to GAGE E;TARBELL.2*!?Vice Resident: 



For full information fill out this coupon or write 



THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY OP THE UNITED STATES 

120 BROADWAY, NEW YORK Dept. No. 16 

Please send me information regarding an Endowment for $ if issued at years of age 

Name Address 



140 



RECREATION. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

"For sport the lens is better than the gun." 

/ wish to make this department of the utmost 
use to amateurs. I shall, therefore, be glad to 
answer any questions and to print any items sent 
me by practical amateurs relating to their experi- 
ence in photography. 



26th 
27th 
28th 

29th 



THE PRIZE WINNERS. 

Recreation's 9th Annual Photo. Com- 
petition closed- November 3pth, and the fol- 
lowing list shows who drew the lucky num- 
bers. 

The judges were A. L. A. Himmelright, 
who is well known to Recreation readers 
as a hunter, traveller and way up amateur 
photographer ; T. E. Niles, managing editor 
of the New York Evening Mail; and Frank 
Presbrey, an all around art connoisseur. 

There were over 500 entries in this com- 
petition, and manv of the pictures are of a 
high order. The judges had -a difficult task 
to select 29 of these for the prizes, and still 
a more strenuous one to decide which of 
these 29 should have the better prizes.. 
These gentlemen, however, did their work 
carefully and conscientiously, and their one 
regret was and is. that they could not give 
substantial recognition to a much larger 
number of the competitors. - 

PRIZE WINNERS. . 

ist prize. Dead Bird, J. W. Tollmann. 
2d Whose Flush? Return of the Fisher- 

man, In Bad Company and Returning 
at Eventide, U. C. Wanner. 
3d " A Visitor to the Cabin, A. W. Ras- 

mussen. -?■■■- 

4th Feeding in a Snowstorm and Shot with 

a Camera, T. M. Twitchell. 
5th Young Kingfishers and Young Foxes, 

John.M. Schreck, 
6th Jumping , Dog, H. P. Dahjen'. 

7th Live Wild Ptarmigan, Thomas Tugwell, 

Jr. - , - . - , . 

8th Morning Exercise, Warming Up, Nest- 

ing Time and The Chief Pleasure oi 
Bathing, Jas. H. Miller. 
Qth " American Magpie, A. W. Stevens. 
10th " Live Wild Ptarmigan and Young 

Loon, A. H. Dunham, 
nth The New Home, Bass Fishings What's 

Doing? and A Striking Pose, W. H. 
Fisher. - ' ■ , . ■ 

1 2th " Wild Geese at Home, H. H. Dean. 
13th " All Down But 7, M. F. Jones. - 
14th " Expectations, J. H. Blackwood. 
15th " Young Egrets in Nest, G. M. DeRose. 
1 6th " Rounding the Buoy. W. H. Graffam. 
17th Golden Winged Wood Peckers and 

Woodchuck and Two's Company, 
Three's a Crowd, F. L. Libby. 
1 8-th " Grasshopper on Thistle, R. H. Beebe. 
19th "•'" A Messenger from Mars, H. W. 

Spooner. 
20th " Hooked, W. Gibson. 
21st Picnicking at the. Old Homestead and 

The Final Regatta, S. W. Matteson. 
22d " Sora at Home, Capt. R. R. Raymond, 

U. S. A. 

23d " Saving the Dog a Cold Bath, Telling 

How It Happened, I Wish He Was 

Baked and A Skin Game, E. W. Ed- 

ington. 

24th " Prairie Chicken on Nest, Jos. Clemens. 

35th «« Young Redwinged Blackbird, We Want 



Otir" Mamma and A Young S'ong Spar- 
row in Nest, H. G. Higbee. 
How Did It Happen? M. A. Yauch. 
Nest of Wild Turkey, E. F. Pope. 
Nest of Killdeer Plover and Nest of 
Bridge Pewee, W"< Stark. 
Redpoll Linnet . on Nest, W\ A. B, 
Sclaten 
The following; Were highly commended: 

Drifting and Undecided, Mrs. J. W. Bussey. 

Spring, A Robin's Nest and Swans, J. H. Black' 
wood. 

A Western Guide and Getting Supper, W. H. 
Graffam. 

Four Abreast and Young Hawks, F. W. Dole. 

All in a Nutshell and The Early Bird, F. L. Libby. 

Waiting for Him to Jump and A High Dive, W. 
H. Rowland. 

Garter Snake and Herring Gulls, H. G. Higbee. 

Saucy Maggie, Phoebe Bird on Nest, Blue Bird 
at Home • and Young Bullock's Oriole, H. 
C. MarkmaH; 

I See the Bunch, Fishing for 'Gators, Well Re- 
trieved, W. N. Fisher. 

A Coming Brood of Quail, F. Chadwick. 

Kingbird at Nest, Young Bluebirds and Up in 
a Balloon, R. H. Beebe. 

Nest of Redwinged Blackbirds", H. G. Phister, 

Working Their Passage, P." Zschule. 

Fighting It Out Down the Stretch, J. M. Schreck, 

It's the Bait'We.Need, F. G. Benson. 

-Silver Tips, Mrs. J. R. Wright. 

Leaving Home ' H. .Criswell. 

Butterfly, W. Yardley. 
.A Brace of Wilson's Snipe, H. H. Fraser. 

Off for a Pay in f:e Woods, S. A_. White. 

Combining Business with 1 leasure, C. Bloom. 

I'm All Ready, Master, A. S. Howard. 

Landlocked Salmon, H. St. Clair Silver. 

Wide Awake, E. C. Stosick. 

Close Quarters, F. T. Brehin. 

A Crow's Nest, C. E. Brobst. 

A Woodland Tragedy, G. W. Damon. 

Comrades, J. W. Rupert. 

Butting In, E. F. Cowgill. 

The Assembly on the Farm, S. W. Matteson. 

Opossum, F. H. Shaw. 

A Willis -Creek Catfish, W. A. Whitecraft. 

A Woodchuck Family, F. S. Andrus. 

A. Wrecked Wagon Bridge, L. F. Weston. 

A 'Trio from the Hills, G. S. Hutchinson. 

Wolf- Hollow, W. A. Cady. 

A Skin Game, E. W. Edington. 

In Bid Company, U. C. Wanner. 

No Title, T. P, Hambly. 

No Title, W. Brewster, Sec. Jr. 

No Title, C. M. Whitney. : 

No Title, W. Ide. 

No Title,' Mrs. H. P. Gatch. 

No Title, -Chas. Vanderwelde. 

No Title, Chas. Vanderwelde. 

• The next competition opens May 1st, and will 

be conducted on somewhat different lines from the 

others-. 



It always affords me great pleasure tp 
look over the : excellent reproductions of 
most interesting photographs published in 
Recreation, especially those entered in your 
photo competitions, along with valuable 
photographic information, making Recrea- 
tion most desirable for those who believe 
and practice that "For sport the lens is bet- 
ter than the gun." 

"In Bad Company" was made with a 
Pony Premo No. 6 camera, 6^x8^2 Plastig- 
mat lens on a Seed portrait orthopaedic 
plate, and printed on platinum paper; ex- 
posure, 1-100 second. 

The picture shows the shooting of a 
wild duck returning with the tame flock. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



I41 



The cluck can Hot be seen in the picture, 
being covered by the splash made in the 
water by the shot. The camera has recorded 
this splash along with some of the feathers 
shot from the fowl. The method of secur- 
ing the effect of the shot was counting from 
one to 3, having it understood that when 
3 was called the shot was to be fired and 
the exposure made at the same time. There 
is no flash from the gun, due to the use of 
smokeless powder. 

''Whose Flush?" was made with a Pony 
Premo camera No. 6, 6y 2 x.8 l / 2 Plastigmat 
lens on a Seed portrait orthopaedic plate and 
printed on platinum paper; exposure, 1-25 
second. 

Both dogs have found the same bird, 
having approached from opposite direc- 
tions. The dog on the right of the pic- 
ture is too near the bird to take proper 
position, due to the wind being from him 
to the bird, but both were held in position 
several minutes until a tripod camera could 
be placed to show both dogs to best advan- 
tage. By drawing a line from the nose of 
each dog the position of the bird may be 
located in the clump of dried grass between 
them. 

"Return of the Fishermen" wa? made 
with a Century Grand Sr. Special camera, 
5x7, fitted with a 6^x8^2 Plastigmat lens, 
exposure, 1-120 second. This picture was 
made at Holly Beach, N. J., and shows the 
Scandinavian fishermen, who live there in 
considerable numbers, and the style of 
boats, etc., used by them in securing a live- 
lihood by sea fishing. They frequently go * 
out 10 to 15 miles in these little launches. 
To watch them going or returning is ex- 
tremely interesting, there being as many as 
40 or 50 boats with 2 men to each boat, 
and usually all leaving or returning within 
an hour. Their wives and children are fre- 
quently grouped on the beach, awaiting 
their arrival to see the result of the day's 
work and welcome their return, the fam- 
ilies adding interest to the scene. 

U. C. Wanner, West Phila., Pa. 

I made the photo of the bear in the 
woods on the head of the East fork of the 
Yellowstone river in the Park. I was 
going into Gardiner by way of the old Cook 
City trail, with pack outfit. 

I do not believe this bear was any tamer 
than any bear outside of the Park, as he 
was 40 miles from the nearest hotel, and 
was a genuine silvertip. I have never seen 
a large silvertip near a hotel. 

The photo was made about 5 o'clock in 
the afternoon, in July last. I had noticed 
some eagles soaring about the mouth of a 
small canyon as I was making camp, so I 
took my camera and went up to see what 
they were eating. They had the carcass of 
a calf elk nearly eaten, They seemed tame, 



and I hid near the bait, thinking to get a 
snap shot at them if they came back soon. 
In about 10 minutes I saw this bear coming 
down the side of the canyon, straight for 
the bait, which lay in the lower end of a 
small park. I slipped around near the 
upper end of the park and hid in some 
thick young pines at the edge of the 
opening. When he came to the park he 
stopped and looked around awhile, then 
started to the bait, but the instant he got 
wind of me he stopped and threw up his 
head to smell, as shown in the photo. I 
had no more than pressed the bulb than he 
turned and shot into the timber on the other 
side of the park. He had not seen nor 
heard me ; the wind was all he wanted. 

The distance of the bear from the 
camera was 18 or 20 paces ; stop 16 ; time, 
.1-50 of a second, if I remember rightly. 

N. W. Frost, Cody, Wyo. 



INFINITY FOCUS. 

It is frequently useful to know the dis- 
tance at and beyond which all objects will 
be in focus when usinar a lens of known 
focal length and a given stop. To obtain 
the requisite information most photograph- 
ers have recourse to the published tables, if 
they are at hand, but a simpler method con- 
sists in marking each lens with its constant, 
which, divided by the f number of the stop, 
gives the so-called infinity focus or distance 
beyond which all objects- will be in focus. 
The constant of any lens is obtained thus : 
Let fa = focal aperture or stop, 

F = equivalent focus of lens, in 
inches. 

K = required constant ; 

F 2 xl00 

rp, or — = infinity focus in feet 

Then:— f ax !2 fa y 

and Kr=F 2 x8.33. 

. The following is a list of constants cal- 
culated for a confusion disc of 1-100 inches : 

Equivalent focus K. Equivalent focus K. 



of 




of 




s in inches. 


lens 


in inches. 




3- 


75 


6-5 


352 


35 


102 


7.0 


408 


4.0 


133 


7-5 


469 


4-5 


168 


8.0 


533 


5-o 


208 


8-5 


602 


5-5 


252 


9.0 


675 


6.0 


300 


10. 


833 



Example : 

Required, constant and infinity focus of 6 

inch lens at f6. 

K = F2 x8"33=(6x6x8"33) 299*8 (say 300). 

K 300 

Infinity focus — = == 50 ft. 

fa 6 

The infinity foci for other stops will be: 

Stops f6 f8 fix '3 fi6 f22"6 f32 f4 

Infinity given in feet 50 37'$ 265 1S7 i3"3 93 6' 1 

— The British Journal of Photography, 



142 



RECREATION. 



LENGTHS OF EXPOSURE. 
I own a 4 x 5 Century Grand camera, 
which is fitted with a convertible lens, the 
different foci being 6 l /\. inches, ioYz inches, 
and 14^2 inches. The longest focus re- 
quires a considerably longer exposure than 
the shorter ones. Can you tell me what the 
comparative lengths of exposure should be 
with the different foci, under the same con- 
ditions, to produce the same result? Also 
what causes this difference? Then, is it 
not true that the wider the angle the lens 
has the quicker it will wprk? 

E. W. Edgington, Le Mars, Iowa. 

ANSWER. 

It is only natural that the single elements 
of a convertible lens should require longer 
exposure than when the lens is used as a 
compound. 

Supposing that the working aperture re- 
mains constant with the use of the different 
focus lenses,' and assuming that the 6^4-inch 
focus lens should require, on a certain sub- 
ject, an exposure of one second, then the 
io^-inch focus lens would require 3 3-10 
seconds and the 14^2-inch focus 46-10 sec- 
onds. 

As the approximate speed of any photo- 
graphic lens is secured by dividing the 
equivalent focus by the opening of the 
aperture, it will be seen that with a lens 
which has an opening of one second and 
an equivalent focus of 8 inches, the speed 
value would be F8. If the focal length is 
increased to 16 inches, retaining the same 
opening of the diaphragm, which would "be 
1 inch, the speed of the lens would then be 
F16; so that, in this instance, should the 8- 
inch focus lens require one secOnd exposure 
the 16-inch focus lens would require 4 sec- 
onds exposure. — Editor. 



A FISH ASSISTANT. 

Last summer I punched some holes in 
a wooden box, hinged a cover on it and 
tied it to the dock in front of my cottage. 
I put about 20 velox and Dekko prints in 
it at 11 o'clock one night, and expected 
the motion of the waves to wash them by 
morning. In the morning I tested them 
with a 2 M N 208 and found plenty of hypo 
left. It took a half hour of constant wash- 
ing to get them test proof. 

The next night I had the same number 
of prints to wash and as, I had a 2 pound 
bass in the live box I put him in with the 
prints. In the morning by the most careful 
test there was no trace of hypo. The bass 
washed all my prints after that and made 
that part, usually the most tedious, the 
easiest of all. He received a few big fat 
minnows every day, and was given his 
liberty the day I left the lake. This is no 
fish story, but is true, and will be of great 
benefit to all photo folk if they will try it. 
I have no patent on it and it is free to all. 



The explanation lies in the fact that the 
fish waved his tail and fins enough to sepa- 
rate the prints, which the ordinary motion 
of the box would not do. The box was 
about twice as large as a starch box, or a 
little larger than half a soap box. 

T. W. Harrington, Chicago, 111. 



I never miss a copy of Recreation. I 
am an amateur photographer and thank 
Recreation for many valuable suggestions. 
I should like to know if the reproductions 
of exposures in colors is a secret, or can 
you give the process of sensitizing plates, 
films or paper to give the proper color in a 
photograph true to nature? Or, can you 
tell me the address of some reliable firm 
who make or handle such? Would prefer 
to know the process. 

V. J. Levy, Spokane, Wash. 

ANSWER. 

A method for obtaining true colors in 
photographs by sensitizing the plate or 
paper has not yet been devised. Colored 
prints are made, however, by the 3 color 
process. This is done by making 3 nega- 
tives of the subject, using different colored 
screens and then printing from each nega- 
tive on the same print in different colors. — 
Editor. 



Will you kindly let me know whether or 
not enlarging can be done with artificial 
light ? Must I have a room arranged spe- 
cially for that purpose ; or can it be done in 
any room. What size would a 5 x 7 print 
make? Will some experienced reader en- 
lighten me as to making of enlargements? 

What is the best formula for the making 
of good Velox prints? 

R. E. Godfrey, Jackman, B. C, Can. 

ANSWER. 

Enlargements are made by both daylight 
and artificial light. A room that can be 
made perfectly dark is necessary. 

Five by 7 prints can be enlarged to any 
size you wish. 

The formula published by the manufac- 
turers is generally the best one for their 
products. Every package of Velox con- 
tains such formulae. — Editor. 



Mother — Harold, darling, where is my 
string of pearls? 

Harold — You mean the million-dollar 
ones, mamma? I lent them to the poor 
little girl next door to skip rope with. — 
Collier's. 



Up-to-date Pastor — The collection will 
now be taken, and those who contribute 10 
cents or more will receive trading stamps 
from the ushers. — Woman's Home Compan- 
ion. 



RECREATION. 



xvii 





Here is Camera Convenience 



ISlfe 

Wmm£ 



The 



Folding 

Film 

Premo 



Loads by daylight in three seconds with 
the 1 2-exposure Film Pack. A single 
motion presents each film for exposure. 

Made in three sizes. 

A handsome Holiday present 



Premo Folding 3 X x 4# 3 % x 5 % 

Film Camera No. I $10.00 $12.50 

Premo Film Pack, 12 exposures .70 .80 



4x5 
12.50 

.90 



Premo Plate Gameras become film cameras by use of the 

Premo Film Pack Adapter. Price, 3% x 4%, $1.00 ; 4x5, 

$1.50; 5x7, $2.50. 



ROCheSter Optical CO., Rochester, New York 

Catalogue at Dealer's or by Mail. 



xviii RECREATION. 



EVERY SPORTSMAN NEEDS 

A Gun Cabinet 

It is just the thing in which to keep his 

Guns, Ammunition, Fishing Tackle 

and other Jewelry in perfect order and properly protected from dust 

and moisture 



SEND ME 



35 Yearly Subscriptions 



to 



RECREATION 



and I will send you a gun and 
fishing tackle cabinet made by the 
West End Furniture Co., Williamsport, 
Pa., listed at $33. 



Sample Copies for ^Lse in canvassing 
furnished 07^ request 



ADDRESS 



RECREATION 

23 West 24th St., New York City 



RECREATION. 



xix 




^/l GOE'RZ, 

TltlEDER^ 

*BIJ*OCULA,P^ 

is an almost indispensable part of 
the outfit of every yachtsman, motor 
boatman, launchman, or canoeist. 
Next in importance to this is an 

AJVSCH\/LT& CAMBER A 

with focal plain shutter. Goerz 
Lenses are essential in the making 
of perfect photographs. All An- 
schultz cameras are equipped with 
Goerz lenses. 



C. V. GOE'RZ, 

Room 27 
52 East Union Square, New York. 

Main Office: ^Branch Offices: 

Berlirv-Friedenaw, 4 and 5 Holborn Circus, 

Germany. London, England 

22 Rue De 1' Entrepot, Paris. 



Vnm 



XX 



RECREATION. 



DO YOU WANT 

A Good, Reliable, Substantial, Well-Made 

REVOLVER? 

If so, send me 

5 Yearly Subscriptions 

I will send you such a Revolver as a premium 




It is made by the HARRINGTON AND RICHARDSON ARMS CO., 
and this means good-material and good workmanship. 



Any other article made by that firm can be had on a basis of one yearly sub 
scription to each dollar of the list price. 



SAMPLE COPIES FOR USE IN CANVASSING 
FURNISHED ON APPLICA TION 



Address RECREATION 
23 West 24th Street, New York City 



RECREATION. 



xxi 



f 




With the New 
Year come the 
new improve- 
ments 

embodied in the 



Folding Hawk-Eye 



No. 3, Model 3. 



It has an aluminum frame of unusual lightness and pneumatic release 
shutter with iris diaphragm stops. For film pictures 3% x 4# inches ; or it 
may be fitted with plate attachment. 

THE PRICE. 
No. 3 Folding Hawk-Eye, Model 3, with rapid rectilinear lens 

and pneumatic release shutter, ----- $15.00 

No. 3 Folding Hawk-Eye, Model 3, single lens and pneumatic 

release shutter, -------- 13.50 

BLAIR CAMERA CO. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



You want a Camera 

We make cameras. Perhaps you have never seen 
a Korona camera and may be considering one with a 
more familiar name. If so, send for a Korona catalogue, 
make a selection, and place an order on approbation. 
Make a decision by personal inspection, compare quality 
and prices, then you will surely buy a KORONA. 

A LIBERAL DISCOUNT IS OFFERED 
FROM LIST PRICES TO MAIL ORDER CUS- 
TOMERS. 

When you buy from us, we want you to feel after 
delivery of the goods that you have received better value 
than our catalogue promised. 



JL 



JT'SALL 
IN THE, 

Vlbns;/ 



GUNDLACH-MANHATTAN OPTICAL CO 

730 Clinton Avervvie So., ROCHESTER., N. Y. 

Mention Recreation . 



kkii 



RECREATION. 



A Great Head 




Here is a reproduction of a photograph 
of one of the largest and best Rocky moun- 
tain sheep heads in existence. The horns 
measure i6y 2 inches in circumference at 
the base, and 16 inches out from the skull 
they still measure 16 inches, having tapered 
only y 2 inch in that distance. The length- 
of each horn is 39 inches and the spread 
at the tips is- 17 inches. The horns make 
nearly a complete turn, and if they had not 
been broken in fighting, would undoubt- 
edly have passed the starting point. Most 
naturalists and collectors place an ad- 
ditional value on horns that are broken 
more or less, as such damage indicates the 
natural courage and pugnacity of the ani- 
mal. This ram had evidently spent much 
of his life looking for trouble, at least 6 
inches having been broken from the 



The horns and skull weighed, before 
mounting, 39 pounds. The head was 
mounted by John Murgatroyd, 16 North 
William street, New York city, who, as the 
picture shows, has done an admirable piece 
of work. Mr. W. T. Hornaday, Director 
of the New York Zoological Society, pro- 
nounces this one of the best pieces of taxi- 
dermy he has ever seen done on a sheep 
head. Many taxidermists fail to get the 
natural shape and expression about the 
nose, but Mr. Murgatroyd has reproduced 
this feature accurately, as well as all the 
others. 

This sheep was killed by an Indian in 
the Rocky mountains, North of Laggon, 
B. C. 

The head is for sale, address Gc O* 
Shields, 23 West 24th street, N„ Y. 



RECREATION. 



xxin 



TRIBUTE TO HIS MOTHER. 

In a district school, in a little town in 
Maine, the teacher asked recently for a 
composition from her 6-year-old children on 
the theme of "Mother." This was the effort 
of one little boy : 

MOTHER. 

My mother can wash. 

My mother is good. 

I help her wipe the dishes. 

My mother can iern. 

My mother can wash her hands. 

My mother can wash my hands. 

My mother can go to bangor. 

My mother can go to oltown. 

My mother can go to boastn. 

My mother isant crazy. 

My mother can eat supper. 

My mother can eat bread. 

My mother can woke. 

My mother cant run. 

My mother cant slide down hill. 

My mother cant do tricks. 

My mother cant build a house. 

My mother cant sit in the rode. 

My mother cant wock in the cartrack. 

My mother cant sit in a mudpuddel. 

My mother cant wock a rulear. 

My mother cant make wood. 

My mother cant stand on her head. — Bos- 
ton Transcript. 



Man probably sprang from a monkey 
and woman from a mouse. — Scissors. 



EASTMAN'S 




LING 



Kodak Film 

A film that lies flat in develop- 
ment and remains flat after- 
ward—as easy to handle as 
so many pieces of thin card- 
board. 

Unequaled in speed, in latitude, in the true 
rendering of color values and in non-halation quality. 

All Kodak and Brownie sizes, 
at your Kodak Dealers. 



Write for booklet, 
* ' Film Development Up-to-Date.'" 



EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

Rochester, N. Y. 




XXIV 



RECREATION. 



ONE WEEK IN BUCKTAIL CAMP. 

Sunday morning broke bright and clear, 
with the grass blades tipped with ice. The 
bay mare had been hitched to the light 
blackboard, the pack basket tightly strapped 
on behind, loaded with good things to eat, 
and we were away for a week's hunt. We 
drove 12 miles and left the horse at Young's 
logging camp, then walked on over a good 
trail.. About a mile in, we overtook Bill, 
smoking and whistling softly to himself. 
In less than an hour we came in sight of 
Bucktail, a warm log camp, that had taken 
us 4 weeks to build. It stands on a dry 
knoll in the edge of heaiy green timber, 
close to a cold spring; has 2 good bunks, a 
stove, a table and 2 benches. 

Bill had the camp in good shape, and we 
immediately unpacked the basket, had a 
dinner and a smoke, a few stories and then 
to bed. During the night the wind shifted 
into the South and with it came a fine rain. 
Long before daylight Bill was up. We 
dressed warmly, had a hearty breakfast and 
started out. The rain had softened the 
leaves, so we made little noise in walk- 
ing. On the edge of Shanty Beaver 
meadow, a well known feeding ground for 
deer, we sat watching until nearly 8 o'clock, 
then started toward Moose river. We had 
hunted but a short distance when we jumped 
2 deer. I circled to cut them off, and had 
gone but a few rods when I heard Bill's 
rifle crack. He called to me that he fired 
at both the buck and the doe and had put 
the buck to its knees. We saw where the 
old fellow had been down, but no sign of 
blood. All day we followed those 2 deer, 
and at night we left them on the edge of 
Twin Sister lake. 

It froze hard during the night and the 
burnt grounds were white with frost. The 
next day, when we found where a deer had 
crossed, we followed that old . buck until 
our legs ached, but did not get a shot. 

That night something awoke me, and I 
heard the crack of brush in front of the 
door. I awoke Bill, and held a blanket 
over the window while he lighted a bull's- 
eye lantern. We then got down the old 
smooth bore rifle and I loaded it with buck- 
shot. We opened the door, a ray of light 
was thrown on the brush, and I saw a pair 
of bright eyes looking at the light. I took 
the best aim possible and pulled the trig- 
ger. There was a flash, a roar, and I 
picked myself up off the floor. We lighted 
the lamp and lantern, put on our sweaters, 
boots and trousers and started out to see 
the effect of my shot. We followed the 
tracks and Bill found a bunch of hair, 
clotted with blood, so we knew the buck- 
shot had hit something. In the morning, 
after long search, I saw a leg sticking out 
of a clump of bushes, and I knew that the 
old smooth bore had done its work well. 
He was a spike horn buck weighing about 
no pounds. 

We jumped a doe one morning and had a 
running shot without success. Bill then 
said I should go out to the lake and he 
would drive through to me. Later I heard 



the old .44 speak, and Bill called that he 
was coming. The noise came nearer and in 
a moment I saw a good sized cub tearing 
through the underbrush. I at once fired 
my 30-30, and the second shot stopped him 
with a ball under the right eye. Bill had run 
on to him, climbing a burnt stub, and suc- 
ceeded in getting a good shot. The first ball 
had gone through the cub, knocking him 
off the stub, another had struck him on the 
left shoulder, and Bill's third shot caught 
him just above the tail. 

We had hunted an hour Saturday, when 
we heard firing across the river. We 
turned, that way, thinking perhaps the hunt- 
ers would drive the deer toward us, and 
they did. Bill saw a splendid buck mak- 
ing his way across a swale. I tried a shot, 
which fell short, so I raised my sight 3 
notches and tried again. I was still short 
and immediately put it up to the last notch. 
The buck was running directly to our right, 
and we had a livelv time for a minute, but 
our buck kept straight on until out of 
range. That afternoon I returned home. 
L. W. Secoy, Utica, N. Y. 



The customer was looking at the stock of 
canary birds. 

"This one is your best singer, is it?" she 
said. 

"Yes'm," replied the proprietor of the 
birds. 

"Has it an amiable disposition? Does it 
ever get the sulks?" 

"No oftener, ma'am," he said, "than you 
would naturally expect in the prima donna 
of the establishment." — Chicago Tribune. 



The sick man had called his lawyer. "I 
wish to explain again to you," said he, 
weakly, "about willing my property — " 

The attorney held up his hand .reassur- 
ingly. "There, there!" said he. "Leave 
that all to me." 

The sick man sighed resignedly. 

"I suppose I might as well," said he, 
turning on his pillow. "You'll get it, any- 
way." — Judge. 



Dot's mother said to her, "My dear, you 

should not say, T guess,' 
But say 'presume.' " That very day Dot 

wore a nice, new dress ; 
"I'd like a pattern," said a friend, and then 

the child to whom 
She spoke replied : "We haven't one ; we 

cut it by presume." 

— Philadelphia Post. 



Speaker — I defy any one in this audience 
to mention an action I can perform with my 
right hand that I cannot do equally well 
with my left. 

Voice from the Gallery — Put your left 
hand in yer right hand trousers pocket ! — 
Chicago News. 

IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO 
NATURE READ RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 



XXV 




Gr»L 




A Food that Makes Girls 
Sweet to Look Upon. 



HpHE right food for young ladies is of the 
-*■ greatest importance to their looks, to 
say nothing of the health. You may 
be absolutely certain thin, sallow girls don't 
get the right food. A Brooklyn girl says: 
"For a long time in spite of all I could do I 
was thin, skinny and nervous. My cheeks 
were so sunken my friends used to remark 
on how bad I looked. I couldn't seem to 
get strength from my food— meat, potatoes, 
bread, etc. So I tried various medicines 
without help. 



"I often read about Grape-Nuts, but never tried 
the food until one day something impressed me that 
perhaps if I would eat Grape-Nuts for my nerves 
and brain I could digest and get the good of my 
food. So I started in. The food with cream was 
fascinating to my taste and I went in for it regu- 
larly twice a day. 

"Well, I began to improve, and now while on 
my third package I have changed so my friends 
congratulate me warmly, ask me what in the world 
I have taken, etc., etc. My cheeks are plump and 
rosy and I feel so strong and well. I sleep sound 
and it seems as though I couldn't get emough to eat. 
Thank you sincerely for making Grape-Nuts.'. 
Name given by Postum Co., Battle Creek, Mich. 

There's a reason. 



Nvits 



xxvl RECREATION. 



STILL ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 

Send me 30 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION and I will send you a 

No. 1 Double Barrel 
Breech Loading Hammerless Gun 

Hade by the Ithaca Gun Co. 
and Listed at $40 

I have contracted for 20 of these 
guns at a price which enables me to 
offer them as above, and they will 
doubtless all be taken within the next 
3 months. 

If You Want One Get Busy at Once 

Sample copies of RECREATION for 
use in canvassing furnished on application 



RECREATION, 23 West 24th St., Hew York 



RECREATION, 



xxvn 



CRYSTAL 

Domino 

SUGAR 



S^^MK^J^*""^ 












l' **$• 



Triumph 

Sirgap 
Making I 



■■.."'.. .'.•...'■■ ... .- -.-',-■ , - - , wpm$KS&$gr 

Sold bnly in 5 lb. sealed boxesl 



Convenient in form, perfect in quality, brilliant in appearance, no sugar made can equal it in excellence. Every piece 
sparkles 1 ike a cluster of diamonds, the result of its perfect crystallization. You will be pleased the moment you open a box* 
") YOU WILL BE BETTER PLEASED WHEN YOU HAVE TRIED IT IN YOUR TEA, COFFEE, ETC. 

SOLD BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE. 

-> Remember that each package bears the design of a "DOMINO" MASK, "DOMINO" STONES and the names of 
the manufacturers (HAVEMEYERS & ELDER, New York). INSIST UPON HAVING THE GENUINE. 



I have read in Recreation much about 
the new automatic gun and am pleased at 
the stand you have taken regarding it. You 
have voiced my sentiments to a dot in re- 
gard to this game hogs' weapon. The first 
chance I had to inspect one of these guns 
was when a local dealer told me he had 
one of the new automatic guns, and would 
like to have me call to see it. I did so, and 
when I got through with him and the gun 
he knew what I thought of the engine of 
death and of a man who would use or sell 
such a thing. One of my best friends came 
to see me a day or 2 ago, a man with whom 
I have hunted ever since I began to shoot. 
He told me about the automatic gun and 
that he was going to have one. I listened 
until he had his say. Then it was up to 
me, and when I finished he was on my side 
of the question. 

C. G., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



"What d'ye want?" asked the coachman 
at the kitchen door. 

"De boss o' de house sent me 'round 
here," replied the tramp, "an' said you was 
to gimme anything I needed." 

"All roight. Come out to the stable an' 
Oi'll turn the hose on ye." — Philadelphia 
Public Ledger. 

IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 



"Oh ! Ouch ! Stop that !" yelled Tommy. 

"Why, Tommy, aren't you ashamed?" ex- 
claimed his mother. "I wouldn't cry like 
that if it were my hair that was being 
combed." 

"I'll bet you would if I wuz doin' the 
combin'," replied Tommy. — Catholic Stand- 
ard and Times. 




Bid you ever see 5 straight or circular rows of 
Pansies side by side, each a different color? If so, 
you know that the effect is charming. Did you ever 
see Childs' Giant Pansies, marvels in beauty and 
true to color? If not, you have not seen the best. 

As a Trial Offer we will for IO cts. mail 5 
Pkts.Giant Pansies* XnowWhlte,(o:i 1 IS hick, 
CardinalRed,PureYellow,AznrcBlue; also 

Five Pkts. Jfew Giant Sweet Peas for IO cts., 
White, Pink, Scarlet, Blue, Yellow; also 

Five Pkts. newearly flowering Carnation Pink* 
for IO cts., Scarlet, White, Pink, Red and Striped— 
or All IS Pkts. for 25 cts. 

Our Catalogue for 1905— Greatest Book of 
Flower and Vegetable Seeds, Bulbs, Plants and 
New Fruits. 148 pages, 600illustrations,many plates 
—will be mailed Free. Scores of Great Novelties. 

JOHN LEWIS CHILDS, Floral Park, N.Y. 



xxvui 



RECREATION, 




The Truth 

Can be told about 

Great 

Western 

Champagne 

— tr\d Standard of 
American Wines 

There is nothing to conceal in 
its production. It is Pure 
Grape Juice, fermented and 
aged to exact perfection for 
healthfulness, possessing the 
bouquet and flavor that con- 
noisseurs desire. 

"Of the six American 
Champagnes exhibit- 
ed a.t the Paris expo- 
sitiorv of 1900, tKe 
GREAT WESTERN 
W&s the only or\e 
that received a GOLD 
MEDAL." 

Pleasant Valley Wine Co. 

Sole Makers, Rheims, N. Y. 

Sold by respectable \7ine dealers everywhere. 



Hotel Nottingham 



COPLEY 
SQUARE 



BOSTON 
MASS. 




Elegant High Class family and Transient Hotel. 

Luxurious rooms, single or en suite. European Plan 
Exclusively. Excellent cuisine and tine orchestra. 
Centrally located and convenient to theatres and shop- 
ping- districts, at the same time being in the most refined 
part of the city. Two minutes from Bach Bay sta- 
tion of IN. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., and Huntington 
Avenue Station of N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R. and 
B. St A. R. R. Rates from $ 1 .00 per day and up* 

E. W. BOYCE, Manager. 




HOTEL EMPIRE 

NEW YORK CITY. 

$250,000 



over 



Broadway & 63d St. 
Empire Parh 

in 
Improve- 
IUUU , ments 
JCJST COMPIiETJED 

ELECTRIC CLOCKS, TELEPHONES 

AND AUTOMATIC LIGHTING 

DEVICES IN EVERY ROOM 

Completely Remodeled, Redecorated and 

Refurnished throughout 

One minute to Elevated and Subway Stations 

Take nearest car at any Railroad or Steamboat 
Terminal, They all pass or Transfer to the Empire 

Rooms (with use of bath) $1.50 per day up 

" " private " 2.00 " " 

Suites " " " 3.50 " " 

W. JOHXSoN dUINIV 

Messrs. W. H. Van Horn, J. N. Bowen, 
James Snell, and Wm. Tidd, of Lead, S. D., 
have sent me within the last few months 
200 subscriptions, and I have shipped them 
a beautiful Wing piano as a premium. It 
reached them in good condition and they 
express themselves as well pleased with it. 

These young men have-shown remarkable 
energy and thrift in stirring up their neigh- 
bors in this lively way, and they now have 
a means of spending many a pleasant hour 
together. There are more pianos where 
that one came from. 

She — I wonder why the baby doesn't be- 
gin to talk, John ? 

He — I guess because you don't give him 
a chance. — Yonkers Statesman. 




Hotel 

touraine 



Delaware Ave. & Johnson Pk. 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

A modern, high-class and conven- 
ient stopping place, offering every 
accommodation for the comfort 
and pleasure of transient guests. 
Moderate prices. 

Harry C. Griswold, Proprietor. 



RECREATION, 



XXIX 



I 

I 

i 

:i 



YOU D0N7 NEEDAGUN 
IF YOU KNOW 



jflhjwsv 



If you would know how to defend yourself, unarmed, against every form of vicious attack and render 
helpless your assailant with an ease and rapidity which is astonishing — if you would possess that physical 
strength and power of endurance which characterizes the Japanese soldier — you must learn Jiu-jitsu. 

Jiu-jitsu is the most wonderful system of physical training and self-defense the world has ever 
known. Its practice develops every muscle, every tissue and strengthens every organ of the 
human body. It makes men "strong as steel," and women the physical equal of men of their own 
age and weight. As a mearfs of self-defense, it is as potent at short range as the most deadly 
weapon. The science of Jiu-jitsu includes a thorough knowledge of anatomy, and teaches how to 
produce temporary paralysis by a slight pressure exerted at one of the many vulnerable points. 
When once a person skilled in the art effects one of the Jiu-jitsu "holds," it is utterly useless for an 
opponent to offer resistance. It makes no difference how unequally matched in point of size or 
strength the contestants may be, a knowledge of Jiu-jitsu will enable a woman to overcome and 
render powerless the strongest man. 

JIU-JITSU SUCCESSFULLY TAUGHT BY MAIL 

For over 2,000 years the principles of Jiu-jitsu have been religiously guarded. By an Imperial 
edict the teaching of the system was forbidden outside of Japan. The friendly feeling, however, ex- 
isting between Japan and the United States has been instrumental in releasing Jiu-jitsu from its 
oath-bound secrecy, and all the secrets of the Japanese National System of Physical 
Training and Self-Defense are now being revealed to the American people for the first 
time by tht- Yabe (School of Jiu-jitsu, at Rochester, N. Y. Mr. Y. K. Yabe, 
formerly of the Ten-Shin Ryu School of Japan, has formulated a correspondence course 
which contains full instructions in Jiu-jitsu. It is identical with the course taught in 
the leading school ol Japan. 

FIRST LESSON SENT FREE 

An intensely interesting book which explains the principles of Jiu-jitsu has just 
been written by Mr. Yabe. As long as the edition lasts, this book, together with the 
first lesson in the art, will be sent free to interested persons. The lesson is fully illus- 
trated with full-page half-tone engravings, and shows one of the most effective methods 
known to Jiu-jitsu for disposing of a dangerous antagonist. If you desire to know 
more about the closely guarded secrets of this marvelous science, you should write to- 
day for this free book and specimen lesson. They will be sent you by return mail, 
postpaid. Address 

THE YABE SCHOOL OF JIU-JITSU 

104 S. Realty Building Rochester, N. Y. 



g^^c^^c -Hir— ? mz=zmi: — =& 




I read your magazine with pleasure, and 
am surprised at the wonderful influence it 
is exerting with many who formerly killed 
large bags of game and creels of fish. 

The pump and the automatic shot guns 
are used by the greedy fellows, many of 
whom would not willingly leave one bird 
for seed. 

G. H. Birdsall, Scranton, Pa. 



Dyer — So Higbee has become bankrupt ! 

Wyld — Yes. He tried to run a 40 horse 
power auto <on a 5 horse power salary. — 
Exchange. 



Col. E. S. Cobb enjoyed a moonlight 
fox hunt one night last September. His 
pack of dogs raced an hour and three- 
quarters for a fox and finally killed him. 
That was the first hunt of the season, and 
Col. Cobb said it was one of the best he 
had ever had in St. Tammany. The weather 
was all that could have been desired, and 
the dogs did not run out, but showed 
ability to follow the trail. Col. Cobb in- 
tends to add several hounds to his already 
large pack. 

B. D. T., New Orleans, La. 



No. 58 



Here is a Knife Men Loye 

So Much they hate to Throw an old Handle away 




THIS IS TEDDY'S 
CAMP KNIFE. 

No. 68. Cut is exact size; ebony 
handle, 3 blades, German silver 
ends. The long blade is for rough 
or fine work; the medium blade 
is as thin as a razor. Price, 
postpaid, $1.00. 

We call our finest penknife 
"Chauncey Depejv's Pet," has 3 
blades. Handle is choicest se- 
lected pearl; German silver back 
and ends. Price in chamois 
case, $1.50, postpaid. ISazor 
Steel jack-knife, 2 blades, see 
lower cut, price 75c, but -18c 
for a while; 5 for $2.00. This 
knife and 60c. Shears for 
$1.00. Hollow ground razor 
and strop to suit, $1.33. 
Illustrated 80-page list free, 
and "How to use a Razor." 

Maher&Grosh Co. 

74 A Street 

Toledo, • Oht« 



XXX 



RECREATION. 



WINTER IS HERE 

GET A PAIR OF SKATES 

For yourself, your best girl or your brother, or for some other 
girl's brother, or for anyone you love, and who is fond of skating 




LADIES' LOCK LEVER 

GRADE 3 



For 5 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 



I WILL SEND YOU 



A Pair of Lock Lever Skates 



OR 



A Pair of Ladies* Lock Lever Skates 

Grade 3, made by Barney & Berry, Springfield, Mass. 



LOCK LEVER 




As every skater knows, these are the best skates in the world. 
The Holiday season is here, and you could scarcely select a more 
appropriate present. 

FOR A MAN, OR A WOMAN, A BOY OR A GIRL 

than a pair of these high-grade skates. Only a limited stock on hand, and 
when these are gone this offer will be withdrawn. 

Sample copies of RECREATION for use in canvassing; furnished 
on application. 

Address 23 West 24th St., New York 



RECREATION. 



XXXI 



Bad soaps bite 
and sting. Use only 
Williams' Shaving 
Soap. 

Williams' Shaving Sticks and Tablets sold every- 
where. Free trial sample for 2 -cent stamp to pay 
postage. Write for booklet, "How to Shave." 

The J. B. Williams Co., Glastonbury, Conn* 

A yellow stain over the negative often 
appears when pyro is used as a developer. 
A pyro developer can be so mixed that the 
negatives will be gray, even to a positive 
black and white. Some operators like nega- 
tives of a warm yellowish tone, believing 
that brighter and pluckier prints result from 
them. The Seed formulae are compounded 
with this idea, and if such a developer is 
used over and over, the negatives come out 
more yellow than was intended. Also in 
case of under exposure, where the develop- 
ment has to be kept up a long time to bring 
out the details, this staining occurs. 

A formula for a clearing solution that 
has been tried and found excellent is ; 

Alum .....* I ounce 

Hydrochloric acid 1 fluid ounce 

Boracic acid ^> ounce 

Water 16 ounces 

The hydrochloric acid may be the com- 
mercial muriatic acid. It may take con- 
siderable shaking to dissolve the boracic or 
boric acid, which is a crystalline powder, 
and if a little remains undissolved it will 
do no harm. 

The solution can be used over and over 
for a year. It will do its full work in half 
a minute, and in that time will do all that 
any clearing solution will do. Lay the nega- 
tive in tray containing enough of the solu- 
tion to cover the plate or film and the 
tray. In warm weather when the gelatine 



After 
Exposure 

to freezing weather, 
rub chapped hands 
and face, chilblains 
and frost-bitten find- 
ers and toes with 
Pond's Extract. 

Takes out the smart 
and brings speedy pe- 
lief. Just one example 
of a hundred virtues of 



/< 



©> 



"The Old Family Doctor" 

When fatigued, refreshes like sleep. 

Sold only in sealed bottles under bvjf wrapper. 

Accept No Substitute. 



is soft and tender, the treatment should not 
be longer than a minute, but in cold 
weather or with gelatine that will stand 
this or any other acid solution, the nega- 
tive can be left in half an hour, if de- 
sired, without danger of producing reduc- 
tion or thinning the image, as other clear- 
ing solutions do. A thorough washing 
should follow. — The Camera. 



I have just received the Laughlin foun- 
tain pen, and am well pleased with it. I 
thank you much, and will get you some 
more subscriptions in a few days. 

Roy S. Williams, Del Rio, Tex. 



EXHAUSTED OR DEBILITATED 
NERVE FORCE from ANY CAUSE 

WINCHESTER'S SPECIFIC PILL. 



NERVOUSNESS 

II cured WINCHESTER 



It contains no Mercury, Iron, Cantharides, or any injurious ingredient whatever. 



This Pill is purely vegetable, has been tested and prescribed by physicians, and has proved to be the best, safest, and most 
effective treatment known to medical science for restoring Vitality, no matter how originally impaired, as it reaches the root 
of the ailment. Our remedies are the best of their kind, and contain only the best and purest ingredients that money can buy 
and science produce; therefore we cannot offer free samples. 

Pr B«, b N , E s ?a iea A Mair No HumbuK, C. O. D. or Treatment Scheme 

PFR^flM Al OPINIONS * Dear Sir8: T haVe " Sed a bottle of y° ur Hypophosphites of Manganese for liver and kidney complaint in my 
I LIIOU11HL. Ul I II 1 U II ■ own person and received much benefit; so I will enclose five dollars and will ask you to send me as much 
as you can by express prepaid for that amount, until we can get it through the regular channels. I am confident it is just what I have been in 
search of for many years. lam prescribing your Hypophosphites of Lime and Soda, and am pleased with the preparation. 

Yours sincerely, Dr. T. J, WEST. 
I know of no remedy in the whole Materia Medica equal to your Specific Pill for NervouB Debility.— ADOLPH BEHKE, M. D., Professor of 
Organic Chemistry and Physiology, New York. 

Send for free Treatise, securely sealed. 

WINCHESTER. &. CO.. Chemists, 717 Beekman Building. New York 

FOR WEAK LUNGS USE WINCHESTER'S HYPOPHOSPHITES. EST. 1858. 



xxxii RECREATION. 



The Acme of Sport 
in Rifle Shooting 

can only be attained by the use of a telescope 
With a high power instrument of this kind attached to 
your rifle you can do much better work at any distance 
than with ordinary sights. Furthermore, you can 
see your bullet hole in the target, after each shot up 
to 200 yards .and thus know just what you are doing. 

Send me IO yearly subscriptions to 

RECREATION 

and I will send you a Rough Rider Telescope to fit your 
rifle. Or you can' ship your rifle to the factory and have 
the tube attached. Any other telescope made by the 
Malcolm Rifle Telescope Co., Syracuse, N. Y., will be 
furnished on the basis of one yearly subscription to each 
dollar of the list price. 



Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. 



ADDRESS 



RECREATION 



23 West 24th St. New York 



RECREATION. 



XXXlll 



"At the foot of Pikes Peak." 



COLORADO 
SPRINGS 



Like a child at play, Colorado Springs 
sits basking in the sunshine at the foot 
of Pikes Peak, amid the most enjoyable 
surroundings. No location could be 
more delightful. This region is best 
reached from the East by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 

and their connections, with but one 
change of cars from New York or 
Boston. 

For particulars inquire of any New 
York Central ticket agent. 



A copy of "America's Winter Resorts," will be sent 
free, on receipt of a two cent stamp by George H. 
Daniels, General Passenger Agent, New York Central & 
Hudson River R. R., Grand Central Station, New York. 



Whether I am hunting ruffed grouse and 
foxes in old Vermont or shooting quails, 
jack rabbits or deer in California, the first 
of every month I must have Recreation, 
which I think superior to any other maga- 
zine. I like the way you treat the true 
sportsman ; also the way you roast your 
pork. 

H. L. Moore, Redlands, Cal. 



First Poker Player — I say we quit the 
game, now we're even. 

Second Poker Player — Even ! How -do 
you make that out? 

First Poker Player — Why, you had all of 
my money a while ago, and now I've got all 
of yours ! — Detroit Free Press. 



Parson — Isn't the Lord good, boys, to 
send this snow so you can have sport snow- 
balling? 

Boy — Yes, parson ; and what is better, He 
has sent you this way in a silk hat. — Puck. 

"For goodness' sake, Dorothy," exclaimed 
mamma impatiently, "why do you talk so 
much?" 

"I guess," replied the little girl, "it's be- 
cause I've got so much to say."— Philadel- 
phia" Ledger. 



IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 



r\ 



C.3 



OF 
DESIRE 



Nowhere in all the world is there a country which offers 
you the inducements of this new territory of Uncle Sam's. 
To home-maker or to traveler Nature extends her wel- 
come of a perfect climate for work or play. Soft, balmy, 
semi-tropical days and cool nights, marvelously beauti- 
ful scenery, a progressive people, warm-hearted and hos- 
pitable—that is Hawaii to-day. No other country has 
such present interest or such future promise. 

Only five days from San Francisco over the tran- 
quil Pacific on luxurious, modern steamships. 
Full information from all railroads. Send for 
souvenir booklet of photographs. 

HAWAII PROMOTION COMMITTEE 
Honolulu, T. H. 

New York, 874 Broadway. Los Angeles, 207 W. Third St. 



Brotherhood 
Wines 

Are Made in America 
By Americans 
And for Americans 

They are pure, wholesome 
wines, and all good phys- 
icians prescribe them read- 
ily for their patients. 

Many experts pronounce Brotherhood 
Wines equal to those produced in 
the best French vineyards. 

Made By 

The Brotherhood Wine Co. 

EDWARD R. EMERSON, PRESIDENT 

Eastern Vineyards and Vaults at 

WASHINGTONVILLE, N. Y. 

N.Y. Office: Cor. SPRING & WASHINGTON STS. 




3CXX1V 



RECREATION. 



Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 



1'FOUNT/M 




FOUNTAIN 
PEN 

Guaranteed Finest 
Grade 14k. 

SOLID GOLD PEN. 

To test the merits of 

« RECREATION 

wmM&Sk asan advertisingmedium 
■ we offer your choice of 

These 

Two 

Popular 

Styles 
For Only 



PUNTAffii 



Kwawiiss 

mm 




Postpaid 
to any 
Address 



(By registered mail, 8c. extra 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large size 14k. geld pen, 
any flexibility desired — 
in feeding device perfect. 

Either Style— RICHLY | 
GOLD riOUNTED for 

piesentation purposes, 
1 $1.00 extra. 

Grand Special 
Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week ; if you do not find 
it as represented, fully 
as fine a value as you 
can secure for three times 
the price in any other 
make, if not etirely sat- 
isfactory in evey respect, I 
return it and we will send \ 
you $1.10 for it the extra y 
ioc. is for your trouble in 
writing us and to show our 
confidence in the Laugh lin 
Pen — (Not one customer i 
in 5,000 has asked for his 
money back.) | 

Lay this RECRFATION Down 
and Write NOW. 

Safety Pocket Pen Holder sent 
free of cha&ge with each Pen 

ADDRESS ; 

Laughlin Hfg. Co. 

424 Griswold St., DETROIT, MICH 




"BRISTOL" 
CALENDAR 

for 1905 

This beautiful calen- 
dar 13 lithographed in 
ten colors and will be 
much admired wher- 
ever seen, as it is full 
of interest for all who 
enjoy out-door sports. 

We will send this calendar to any 
address on receipt of ten cents (in 
silver) to cover cost of mailing. 

The Horton Mfg. Co. 

86 Horton St. 
Bristol, Conn. 



RECREATION. 



3fc3£S£V 



For HUNTERS, ANGLERS, 
PROSPECTORS, RANCHMEN 



ami all others who go 
into the Woods or Hills 



Th L P Z Knife ' 



s the 




One-half actual size 

Our 5-inch Press Button Hunting Knife can 
not be excelled. Can be opened with one 
hand, and will not open or close accidentally 

Send for Catalogue for descrip- 
tion and prices of other styles 

Mention Recreation. 

Handsome Stas aA^ 
Handle, Price VUC 

National Cutlery Company 

W A L D E N . N E W; Y O R K 



WHAT A DOCTOR SAYS OF RECRE- 
ATION. 

I acknowledge receipt of the Royal anas- 
tigmat lens, made, by the Rochester Lens 
Co., that you offered as a premium for new 
subscribers. The Rochester Lens Co. was 
kind enough to fit the lens to my shutter 
free of charge. The lens is all its makers 
claim. Its work is a revelation to one who. 
is accustomed to the old fashioned photo- 
graphic lenses, and it is satisfactory in 
every respect. 

I secured practically all the subscriptions 
in one evening. Canvassing for Recreation 
is a cinch. The magazine sells on sight. 

One of the men whose names I sent you 
had been a subscriber several years ago, and 
when I inquired why he let his subscription 
lapse he said : "The trouble was that every 
time Recreation came to the house I read 
it and at once felt a longing for the woods, 
fields and streams, so strong as to unfit me 
for business. Hence, I stopped Recreation 
in self-defence. Since then I have learned 
to control my feelings better, and am will- 
ing to read Recreation again. 

The man I quote is a prominent doctor. 
J. A. Grening, Scranton, Pa. 



One day as a schoolmaster, with aspect 
fierce and cane upraised, was about to pun- 
ish one of his pupils, the little fellow said, 
doubtless with some recollection of a visit 
to the dentist, "Please, sir, may — may I 
have gas?"— Pittsburg Bulletin. 




Do This? 



A well-sharpened razor should cut a hair held between finger 
and thumb and do it at a touch. Will yours? If not you 
need a Torrey Strop. No other strop has the wonderful sharp- 
ening qualities of the Torrey. They are made of the finest 
materials and by a process known only to the Torrey makers. 



Torre 




are made in all styles. Popular prices— GOc, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, 
$2.00 and $2.50. Sent postpaid if your dealer cannot supply. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Torrey's Oil-Edge Dressing will keep any strop soft and 
pliable. Price 15c at dealers, or mailed o:i receipt of price. 
Catalogue of Torrey Strops, containing valuable informa- 
tion for those who shave, sent free. 

J. R. TORREY & CO., P. 0. Box 44 , Worcester, Mass. 



"I think," declared the little daughter of 
the widow to the millionaire who was call- 
ing, "that you are a charming and delight- 
ful man." 

"How nice. What makes you say so?" 
"Mamma told me to."— Detroit Free 
Press. 



Just received my Bristol rod in good 
shape. Many thanks to you for this beau- 
tiful premium. 

J. B. Stephenson, Wyandotte, W. Va. 



Clara — Did he propose to you before or 
after he kissed you ? 

Maud — I can't tell. During the excite- 
ment I forarot all the details. — Life. 



Can You Shave? 

Rub a little "3 in One" 

on your razor strop till 

leather becomes soft and 

pliable ; draw razor blade 

[<afc between thumb and finger 

l^» moistened with "3 in One"; 

' j then strop. The razor cuts 

v 5 times as easy and clean; 

holds the edge longer. "A 

k Razor Saver for Every 

Shaver" which gives the 

scientific reasons, and a 

generous trial bottle sent[ 

8 free. Write to-day. 

O W. COLE CO. 

122 Washington Life Bldg v 

New York. 



XXXVI 



RECREATION. 



When Fitting out your Yacht 




please remember that I make a line of 
steamer trunks especially adapted to the 
use of yachtsmen. 

When going to the seashore or to the 
mountains, or abroad, provide yourself and 
your family with 






r 




The most practical, useful and luxurious 
traveling trunk ever invented. 

Illustrated catalogue on request. 

Mention Recreation. 



Frank A. Stall man, Sp 8 rl ng ^ £t Columbus, O. 



I received the Blauvelt hunting coat as 
a premium for subscriptions to Recrea- 
tion and am more than pleased with it. 
Please accept my thanks. It was far be- 
yond my expectations. I will try for an- 
other premium soon. 

Warren Miles, Ansilina, Pa. 



Tommy was at the museum. He was 
backing away from a lion, when grandma 
said to him : "Don't be afraid of the lion. 
He is stuffed." 

Little Tommy answered: "Well, he may 
not be stuffed so full but what he could 
make room for a little boy like me !" — 
London Chronicle. 



. Mrs. Henpeck — This paper says that mar- 
ried women live longer than single ones. 

Mr. Henpeck — Heavens, woman ! Can't 
you think of something pleasant to talk 
about ? — Borrowed. 



I received the Bristol rod as a premium 
for 5 subscriptions I sent you some time 
ago. It is a beauty and I thank you sin- 
cerely. 

Geo. S. Kleckner, East Bangor, Pa. 



Mistress — Bridget, these are ewers. I 
hope you'll not call them jugs any more. 

Bridget — Thank you, mum. Sure, an' is 
these cups mine, too? — Scissors. 




tHE UPTHEGROVE SPORTING GOODS CO. 

Makers of High Grade Clothing 

VALPARAISO. HMD 



UPTHEGROVE 

Waterproof Hunting Cloths 

English Corduroy — Moleskin— Rainproof 

Mackinaw and Waterproof Duck. 

Strictly Hand tailored to measure. 

10 ok Waterproof Hunting Coat. $5. Extra Quality Rain- 
proof Hunting Coat, (imest coat made) $8; 5 per cent, discount 
if cash accompanies order. All our Coats have silk button holes 
and hand made silk pocket stays. In ordering give— breast, 
waist, length of sleeve and coat measurements, also height 
and weigbt. 

Write for free catalogue — If you want the best made — Try us. 

The Upthegrove Sporting Goods Company 
Dept. C, Post Office Place, Valparaiso, Ind. 

Mention Recreation. 



RECREATION. 



XXXVll 





Revell 



sion 





The illustration shows an artistic 
and serviceable library table with 
shelf for magazines or books and 
an invisible drawer, designed and made in 
our own workshop. Simplicity and charac- 
ter are the distinguishing features of "this 
table. Extraordinary care is used in its construction to give it the highest possible value. 
It is made of solid oak in handsome weathered finish. Send draft or money order for 
amount and we will send table at once. Money refunded if not 



entirely satisfactory. Write us 
illustrations and information free. 

Library Table, size 



wants and 



rill send 



Alexander H. Rev< 

194 Wabash Avenue 




30x48 
32x60 



"I don't care if the meat strike never 
ends," said Mrs. Shooter. "We are sure to 
have all the meat we want." 

"How so?" asked Mrs. Nibbsby. 

"My husband has gone deer hunting, and 
he's sure to kill a few cows." — Cleveland 
Leader. 



"Dad," said little Reginald, "what is a 
bucket shop?" 

"A bucket shop, my son," said the father 
feelingly, "a bucket shop is a modern coop- 
erage establishment to which a man takes 
a barrel and brings back the bung hole." — 
Town Topics. 



I am in hearty sympathy with you in 
your war on the game hog and the market 
hunter. They should be suppressed at once 
and for all time. The penalty should be so 
great that no one would dare break the law. 
In case of convictions half the fine should 
go to the man who secures the conviction. 
The bag should be limited, and a sportsman 
should not be allowed to sell or give away 
game that he has killed. He should be al- 
lowed to kill only for his own use. We all 
have different opinions. I shall always do 
all I can to protect our game and prosecute 
such criminals as game hogs and market 
hunters. 

Wm. A. LaLaurin, Dallas, Tex. 



The Reason the LUTHER HAND-MADE GLOVE will not rip 





Made for practical, comfortable, durability. No oil. No 
Odor. No Animal Glue. Practically seamless. Cannot Rip. 
Unaffected by moisture of any kind. If soiled, may be washed 
with soap and hot water, without injury. The Luther Fastener 
is adjustable, fits any wrist and cannot get out of order. _ Illus- 
trated booklet, samples and self-measurement rule on application 

No 308 DRIVING GLOVE, postpaid anywhere $1.50, Made to measure, $2. 
No. 320 GAUNTLET, " " 2.50, " " 3. 

If you prefer to buy through your dealer send us his name. 

J. P. LUTHER GLOVE CO., 536 Pearl St., BERLIN, WIS, 



xxxviii 



RECREATION. 



A Duxbak 



Hunting Coat 





is the proper thing for 

A Shooter, 

An Angler, 
A Prospector, 
A Farmer 

or even a plain 
ordinary man. 



I will give you one of these coats 

For 10 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

These coats are made by Bird, Jones & 
Kenyon, Utica, N. Y., and are listed at 
$5. Thoroughly waterproof, and yet 
soft, pliable, practically noiseless and 
pleasant to the touch. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing 
furnished on application. 



Address 



Recreation 



23 W. 24th St 



New York 



RECREATION. 



XXXIX 



CHOCOLATE AND OTHER COCOA 
PRODUCTS. 

A recent publication of the Connecticut 
State Experiment Station has an interesting 
summary of data regarding the cocoa bean 
and the products made from it. Chocolate 
and cocoa are made from the beans or seeds 
of several small trees, natives of tropical 
America, of which Theobroma cacao is by 
far the most important Cocoa beans were 
highly esteemed by the aborigines, especially 
the Aztecs of Mexico and Peru, who pre- 
pared from them beverages and foods. They 
were brought to the notice of Europeans by 
Cortez and other explorers, but were not 
extensively imported into Europe until the 
17th century, about the time tea and coffee 
were introduced from the East. At present 
the world's supply comes chiefly from Vene- 
zuela, Guiana, Ecuador, Brazil, Trinidad, 
Cuba, Mexico and other regions bordering 
on the Gulf of Mexico, being gathered in 
those regions from trees both wild and culti- 
vated ; and to some extent from Java, Ceylon, 
Africa and other parts of the Old World, 
where the tree has been successfully culti- 
vated. 

The yellow or brown cocoa fruit is 4 to 
6 inches long, 2 to 3 inches wide and has 10 
ridges passing from the base to the apex, 
giving the surface a melonlike appearance. 
It contains 35 to 75 seeds in 5 rows, em- 
bedded in a mucilaginous substance. The 
seeds, after being removed from the fruit 
and freed from the adhering pulp, are dried 
at once in some localities, but the better 
grades are first subjected to a fermentation 
process, which destroys certain bitter and 
acrid constituents. 

Cocoa beans as they come into the mar- 
ket are reddish brown in color, and some- 
what resemble Lima beans in shape and 
size, but are not so strongly flattened, nor 
are they kidney shaped. Like Lima beans, 
they consist of 2 thickened cotyledons, or 
seed leaves, connected with a small rootlet 
and enclosed within a hull, or shell. The 
dark brown cotyledons are irregularly folded 
and readily break into angular pieces. 

The first stages in the manufacture of 
both chocolate and cocoa are the same. 
After removing stones, chips and other im- 
purities, the beans are roasted, thus devel- 
oping a desirable flavor and facilitating the 
processes of separation from the shell and 
grinding. The roasted beans are crushed 
by machinery and separated from the shells. 
In some factories the rootlets are also re- 
moved. The broken cotyledons, free of 
shells, known as "cocoa nibs," are next 
ground in the chocolate mill. The heat of 
grinding melts the fat, which makes up 
about half the weight of the nibs, and the 
ground product runs out of the mill as a 
thin paste. This paste, after cooling in 
moulds, is chocolate, also known as nlain or 
bitter chocolate to distinguish it from the 
sweetened product. Tn the factory it is 
often known as chocolate liquor. Sweet 
chocolate is prepared by mixing pulverized 
sugar, vanilla or other flavor, and usuallv 
cocoa butter with the warm chocolate paste 
before moulding. 



Cocoa is prepared by removing a portion 
of the fat from the warm mass by pressure 
and reducing the residue to a powder, with 
or without the addition of vanilla flavor. 
"Dutch process" cocoa is treated with an 
alkali, usually soda or ammonia, to hinder 
the fat from collecting on the surface of. the 
beverage prepared from it. This is some- 
times called "soluble cocoa." Cocoa butter 
is the express fat obtained as a by-product 
in the manufacture of cocoa. Cocoa shells 
are used to some extent for the preparation 
of a beverage, but are usually regarded as 
a waste product and are often ground with 
cocoa products, spices, etc., as an adulterant. 

The State experiment station at New Ha- 
ven has made analyses to learn the extent 
of the adulteration of cocoa products sold in 
Connecticut. Of 40 samples examined in 
1903 less than half, that is, 18, were not 
found to be adulterated; 11 were adulter- 
ated; 7 were labeled "compound" goods; 
and 4 were chocolate and cocoa containing 
milk or casein. 

JOHNNY ON THE SPOT. 

Z. A. SPACE. 

Of all the men 

In all the world 
Who serve us to a dot ; 

None else can claim 
One-half the fame 

Of "Johnny on the spot." 

Of all the teachers 

He's the man 
To tell us- what is what; 

And guide our ways 
In searching days 

To get what we have not. 

He's run the mines 

And felled the trees 
And learned the forest ways ; 

He's caught the moose, 
Why, what's the use 

Denying what he says? 

At every point 

Where work is done 
He holds the key of knowledge ; 

And breaks- the rule 
Of every fool 

From district school to college. 

He owns the rank 

Of every class 
Who honor their profession ; 

Who never shirk 
To make their work 

Instructive and a blessing. 

Nor don't decry 

The use of books 
What they contain or not; 

But knowledge gained 
Must lie sustained 

By Johnny on the spot. 

Willie — Say, why did the bronze bust? 
Tim — Let it on. 

Willie — 'Cruise the statuette. — London 
Sketch 



xl RECREATION. 



A Fountain Pen 

has become a necessity with every busi- 
ness man. You can get a 




Fountain 
Pen 

Made by the Laughlin Manufacturing Co. 
Detroit, Michigan 

For 2 Yearly Subscriptions 

to RECREATION 

And you can get these 2 subscriptions in 
20 minutes, any day. 

The Laughlin is one of the best pens in 
the market, and thousands of them are in 
daily use. 

There is no reason why you should be 
without one. 

Sample Copies of Recreation for 

use in Canvassing 

Furnished on Application 



RECREATION. 



xli 






EEaca 



Sportsmen's Oofhing 

Sheds Water like a Duck's Back 

Absolutely waterproof in rain ; light 
and cool in pleasant weather. Coat, 
trousers and hat made of fine soft duck, 
treated by a patent process that resists a 
dreary drizzle or driving storm. L,ined with same 
material and double stitched throughout. Always easy and 
pliable in rain or shine. No rubber — no rustle. Perfect ventila- 
tion at all times.' 

Coat has reinforced gun cap at shoulder; patent ventilated 
gusset under arm. Trousers reinforced from hip to knee. 
Double seat. 

In ordering, give snug breast measure, height, and length of 
arm from center of back. Give waist and leg for trousers. 
Light tan ordead grass color. Fit, finish and waterproof quali- 
ties guaranteed. 

Price coat, $5.00 ; trousers, $3.00 ; hat, $1.00. Express prepaid. 
Sample of material and booklet free. 

BIRD, JONES & KEN YON, 1 Blandina St., Utica, N. Y. 



PARENTHETICAL REMARKS. 

A well known Indiana man 
One dark night last week, 
Went to the cellar with a match 
In search of a gas leak. 
(He found it.) 

John Welch by curiosity 
(Dispatches state) was goaded; 
He squinted in his old shot gun 
To see if it was loaded. 
(It was.) 

A man in Macon stopped to watch 
A patent cigar clipper; 
He wondered if his finger was 
Not quicker than the nipper. 
(It wasn't.) 

A Maine man read that human eyes 
Of hypnotism were full ; 
He went to see if it would work 
Upon an angry bull. 
(It wouldn't.) 

— San Francisco Bulletin. 



I am a reformed game hog. Give it to 
'em. I have quit using ammunition made 
by the Winchester people on account of the 
automatic, and by Peters because it is no 
good. 

Wm. Glaze, Watewate, Colo. 



FOR 



Solid Comfort 



SUMMER or WINTER 



Get a pair of 

Thompson- 
Quimby 

Hunting 
Boots 



I Make the Best 

All work guaranteed. I refer by per- 
mission to the Editor of Recreation. 
Measurement blanks and prices on ap- 
plication. Mention Recreation. 

T. H. GUTHRIE 

240 Halsey St. NEWARK, N. J. 




xlii 



RECREATION. 



The Colorado 
Onyx Co. 

236-237 Equitable Bldg. 
Denver, Colo, 



QUARRIES 
Steamboat Springs, Routft Co., Colo. 



Capital 
Treasury Stock 



300,000 shares 
50,000 shares 



Par value One ^Dollar each, fully paid and 
Non-Assessable. 

No Stockholders Liability. 



Write for particulars as to price of 
stock to 

The Equitable Finance and 
Development Co., Fiscal Agt. 

Equitable Bldg., DENVER, COLO. 



James D. Husted, President. 

John H. Morse, Raymond S. Husted, 
Vice-President. Sec'y & Treas. 



I am in receipt of the gloves from J. P. 
Luther which you ordered sent me as pre- 
for them. I do not see how you can give 
mium. They are beauties and I thank you. 
such excellent premiums for so few sub- 
scriptions. I wish Recreation the success 
it deserves. 

W. A. Harvey, Sherman, Tex. 



Husband (reading) — I see that old Dr. 
Saintly, who went off as a missionary, has 
been devoured by the cannibals. 

Wife — Too bad ! He deserved a better 
fate. 

"Yes ; and the cannibals a better meal." — 
Exchange. 



The International 

Press Clipping Bureau 

which is the largest Press Clipping Bureau in the 
world will send you daily, everything printed 
in every newspaper, magazine or trade journal 
in the country, on any particular subject. 

This Bureau reads and clips 55,000 papers and other period- 
icals each month, and can furnish anyone everything printed 
in the country on business, financial, political, social, theatri- 
cal, scientific, sporting, agricultural, mining, or, in fact, any 
subject whatever that is mentioned in the columns of any 
newspaper or publication. Write and state the subject you 
want clippings on and we will quote you a 

SPECIAL BARGAIN RATE 

for a trial month, that you may understand the great ad- 
vantages to be derived from press clippings. Address, 

International Press Clipping Bureau, " 

112*114 Dearborn Street, Chicago, U. S. A. 

Mention Recreation. 



The Buffalo Is Well Nigh Extincf 

And every nature lover wants a relief 
of him. Here is a chance to get it. 
I have in stock a limited number of 
buffalo horns, highly polished and 
fitted with nickel plated flanges at 
the base, so that they can be 
screwed on the wall, thus forming 

A Novel and 
Effective Gun Rack 

So long as the supply lasts I will 
give a pair of these horns for 

3 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnshed on request. Addresss 



Recreation, 



23 West 24th Street, 
AEW YORK 



The L. and L. Hunting and Fishing Club, 
of Newport, has been organized, with the 
following officers : Morrison Weber, presi- 
dent ; Thomas Jones, secretary ;■ William 
Lampe, treasurer; Peter Kilmer, sergeant- 
at-arms. The following are members : 
Thomas Evans, Fred Koustomer, Jacob 
Schilling, George Kiner, Ed. Leahy, Law- 
rence Donavan, Joe Wallace, M. F. Done- 
Ian, James Thornton, Charlie Donelan, 
Fritz Zuber and Harry Parks. 

W. L., Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Grocer — Do you want apples to cook or 
to eat? 

Small Boy — Both. That's what we cook 
'era for. — Baltimore American. 



PATENTS 



promptly obtained OR NO FEE. Trade-Marks, 
Caveats, Copyrights and Labels registered. 
TWENTY YEARS' PRACTICE. Highest references. 
Send model, sketch or photo, for free report 
on patentability. All business confidential. 
HAND-BOOK FREE. Explains everything. Tells 
How to Obtain and Sell Patents, What Inventions 
Will Pay, How to Get a Partner, explains best 
mechanical movements, and contains 300 other 
subjects of importance to inventors. Address, 

H. B. WILLSON & CO. :w "» 



786 F Street, N.W., 



Attorneys 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



RECREATION. 



xliii 




Find Your 
Portrait on 



THE ROCK Of: FACES 



Lake George, 
New York 



s 



This rock bears innumerable faces, carved by time. While undoubtedly a product of the Glacier Period 
yet strangely the faces are modern. Uncle Sam is there (left base), George Washington (right top), Sitting 
Bull (right edge), Dickens, Gladstone, Walt Whitman, Gen. Grant and scores of others which you will be 
interested to study out. It is most peculiar, and has caused much comment, that a modern product, the 

Ostermoor Mattress $ 15. 

has also set its mark upon this rock and stamped it with the Ostermoor Face. With study you can find 
it; there is rest and repose on the features. If you cannot find the face on the rock, eo out on the street — 
you will find it there. In the office, in the pulpit ; mix with men of toil, or mount the steps of the Execu- 
tive Mansion, the Ostermoor face is everywhere. 

If YOU wish a Face Refreshed with Sound 
Slumber, send for Our FREE 136-Page Book 

This book, "The Test of Time," has cost us $15,000 to issue. It is not a dry, uninteresting' catalogue — it was prepared for us by 
Mr. Willard Moyer (well-known as author of "The Witchery of Sleep") and treats on "Insomnia — Its Cause, famous historical 
beds and their story, and on mattress-making materials of all kinds. It contains over two hundred pictures by well-known 
artists, is printed in two colors on heavy plate paper. It describes our 30 Nights' Free Trial — money returned on demand. 
It treats exhaustively the mattress quesiion, and gives letters of praise from prominent persons. It also illustrates Ostermoor 
Cushions and Pillows for Window Seats, Cozy Corners and Easy Chairs; Boat Cushions, Church Cushions. May we send it? 
Your name on a postal will do. 



STANDARD SIZES AND PRICES : 

2 feet 6 inches wide, 25 lbs., $ 8.35 

3 feet wide, 30 lbs., IO.OO 

3 feet 6 inches wide, 35 lbs., 1 1 .70 

4 feet wide, 40 lbs., 13.35 
4 feet 6 inches wide, 45 lbs., 1 5.00 

All 6 feet 3 Inches long. 

In two parts, 50c extra. Special sizes, special prices. 

Express charges prepaid to any place. 




Look Out ! Dealers are trying to sell the 
"just-as~good" kind. Ask to see the name 
"Ostermoor" and our trade-mark label sewn 
on the end. Show them you can't and won't 
be fooled. "It must be Ostermoor." Mat- 
tresses expressed, prepaid by us, same day 
check is received. Estimates on cushions and 
samples of coverings by return mail. 



OSTERMOOR & COMPANY, 114 Elizabeth Street, New York 



Canadian Agency : The Alaska Feather and Down Co., Ltd** Montreal. 



xii 



IV 



RECREATION. 



SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

These goods are all new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at 
which manufacturers and dealers usually sell. 
Here is a good chance to get 



A Book, a Gun, a Camera 
A Sleeping: Bag, a Fishing Rod 
A Reel, a Tent, 



FREE OF 
COST 



Subscriptions need notall be sent at once. They 
may be sent in installments as taken and credit w.ll 
be given on account. When the required number 
s obtained the premium earned/will be shipped. 



These offers are subject to change without notice. 



TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

TWO new yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation at $1 each, I will send a copy of 
Hunting hi the Great West, cloth ; or 
a Recreation Waterproof Match Box, 
made by W. L. Marble and listed at 
50c ; or a Shakespeare Revolution Bait 
listed at 75c ; or a Laughlin Fountain 
Pen ; or a dozen Trout Flies, assorted, 
listed at $1 ; or a pair of Attachable Eye- 
glass Temples, gold-plated, made by Gall 
& Lembke ; or one Rifle Wick Plug, made 
by Hemm & Woodward, Sidney, Ohio, 
30 caliber to 50 caliber, or Shotgun Wick 
Plug, 20 gauge up to 10 gauge ; or an In- 
gersoll Watch or Cyclometer listed at $1 ; 
or a pair of Chrome Tanned Horsehide 
Hunting and Driving Gloves, listed at $1, 
made by J. P. Luther Glove Co. 

THREE new subscriptions at $1' each, a. 
safety pocket ax, made by W. L. Marble 
and listed at $2.50 ; or a dozen Bass Flies, 
assorted, listed at $2 ; or a pair of Shot- 
gun Wick Plugs made by Hemm & Wood- 
ward, Sidney, Ohio, 20 gauge to -10 gauge ; 
or a Polished Buffalo Horn Gun Rack, 
made by E. W. Stiles ; or a Press Button 
Jack Knife, made by The National Cut- 
lery Co., and listed at $1 ; or a pair of 
Gauntlets for Hunting and Driving, ladies' 
size, listed at $2.50, made by J. P. Luther 
Glove Co. 

FOUR new subscriptions at $1 each, an 
Ideal Hunting Knife, made by W. L. 
Marble and listed at $2.50; or a Gold 
Medal Folding Camp Bed, made by the 
Gold Medal Camp Furniture Co. 

FIVE new subscriptions at $1 each, a copy 
of Cruisings in the Cascades, cloth; or 
an Ideal Hunting Knife made by W. L. 
Marble, and listed at $3 ; or a pair of 
lock lever skates, made by Barney & 
Berry, listed at $4.50 ; or a set of convert- 
ible Ampliscopes (5 lenses), listed at $5; 
or an Acme single shot gun, made by the 
Davenport Arms Co., and listed at $8 ; or 
a 32 caliber, automatic double action re- 
volver, made by Harrington & Richardson 
Arms Co. 

SIX new subscriptions at $1 each, a Hawk- 
eye Refrigerating Basket made by the Bur- 
lington Basket Co., or one dozen Eureka 
golf balls listed at $4. 

SEVEN new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
copy of The Big Game of North America, 
or of The American Booh of the Dog, 



cloth, or one set Lakewood golf clubs, 

5 in number, listing at $5. 

TEN new subscriptions at $1 each, a Cut- 
Glass Salad Bowl, made by Higgins & 
Seiter, and listed at $4.50 ; or a Water- 
proof Wall Tent 7x7, made by Aber- 
crombie & Fitch, and listed at $8 ; or a 
Rough Rider rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., and listed 
at $12 ; or a pair of! Opera Glasses made 
by Gall & Lembke and listed at $10 ; or a 
Folding Hawk-Eye Film Camera, No. 3, 
3% x 414, made by the Blair Camera 
Co., listed at $15 ; or a Reel, made by the 
Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co., listed at $6 to 
$9 ; or a Duxbak Hunting Ccat, made by 
Bird, .Tones & Kenyon, and listed at $5; or 
a Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, listed at $6. 

TWELVE new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Davenport Ejector Gun, listed at $10. 

FIFTEEN new subscriptions, $1 each, a 
Shakespeare Reel, Silver Plated, listed at 
$15; or a set of rabbit plates made by 
Higgins & Seiter, and listed at $8; or 
a Field Glass made by Gall & Lembke ; 
or a Kenwood Sleeping Bag, complete, 
with canvas cover, listed at $10 ; or a 
Bulls-Eye rifle telescope, made by The 
Malcolm Rifle Sight Mfg. Co., and listed 
at $1G ; or a pair of horsehide hunting 
boots, listed at $10 ; or a Queen Hammock, 
made by the King Folding Canvas Boat 
Co., and listed at $15 ; or a Folding 
Hawk-Eye Film Camera, No. 4, 4 x 5, 
made by the Blair Camera Co., listed at 
$22.50. 

TWENTY new subscriptions at $1 each, 
a 14-karat Gold Hunting-case Watch, 
with Waltham Movement, listed at $20; 
or an Elita single shot gun, made by the 
Davenport Arms Co., and listed at $18; 
or a Queen Hammock, made by the King 
Folding Canvas Boat Co., and listed 
at $20. 

TWENTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, an 11-foot King Folding Canvas 
Boat. 

THIRTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Waterproof Tent, 14% x 17, made by 
Abercrombie & Fitch, and listed at $25. 

THIRTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, a 14-foot King Folding Canvas Boat, 
or a No. 20 Gun Cabinet, made by the 
West End Furnitu.-e Co., and listed at $33. 

FORTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
• Savage 303 Repeating Rifle. 

FIFTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 
No. CO Gun Cabinet, made by the West 
End Furniture Co., and listed at $48. 

SIXTY new subscriptions at $1 each, a 9 F. 
grade Gun, made by D. M. Lefever Sons 

6 Co., and listed at $90. 

SEVENTY-FIVE new subscriptions at $1 
each, an 8 E grade Gun, made by D. M. 
Lefever Sons & Co., and listed at $110. 

TWO HUNDRED new subscriptions at $1 
each, a strictly first class Upright Piano, 
listed at $750. 



Address, 



Recreation 2 J™VlV th st 



RECREATION. 



xiv 



»& 



YOU CAN MAKE A 

DIAMOND 

YOUR SAVINGS BANK 



DIAMONDS 

PAY 20% 

ANNUALLY 




Gold IMedal Awarded 

"The Loftis System" 

The Superior Jury at the Saint Louis Exposition, after a full consideration of the claims 

of all foreign and domestic exhibitors, have awarded the GOLD M^EDAL to us. 

This puts the official stamp of approval of the greatest exposition ever held, 

upon the LOFTIS SYSTEM — its goods, prices, terms and methods. 

You Can Use The Loftis System. TZ^^^t^SF®^ 

that you want from our Catalogue and we send it to you on approval. It costs you nothing to see it, for we pay 
all express charges whether you buy or not. If you like the Diamond sent, you pay onejifth of the price and keep 
it, sending the balance to us direct in eight equal monthly payments. The monthly payments will be just the 
same as putting a monthly deposit in a savings bank and will pay much bet ter. 

"^Vif-fc-B ■■ A sr»£% TVTrf-k4- HPrf-n-k °E#tw» AxTrofi- to have a Diamond Savings Account with us. "We 
I OLl ^\.L C INUL L CIO JLaX AWdy open these accounts with honest people all over 
America. The ten dollar a week employe is just as welcome on our booics as is his well-to-do employer. Our easy 
savings terms make any honest person's credit good. 

l - >*a-*7' /"*rt a T-» T-P "Vz-k-i i T^r* .p^vot* We also have a cash plan, and it is just as far beyond com- 
A «A«y V^djll M.L 1 LIU rlcicli petition as our easy payment terms. Read this: Select any 
Diamond and pay cash for it, and we will give you a written agreement that ypu may return the Diamond any time 
within one year, and get all you paid for it — less ten per cent. You might, for Instance, wear a fifty dollar Diamond 
ring, or stud for a year, then bring or send It back to us and get forty-five dollars, making the cost of wearing the 
Diamond for a whole year, less than ten cents per week. 

Afifli7ir»rfc T-T.r»l-r» With every Diamond or Watch, we will, when requested to do so, furnish 
w?d V illg J> neip. you with one of the LOFTIS STEEL SAFES for HOME SAVINGS. Drop 
your pennies, nickels and dimes into the little safe as you can spare them, and your Diamond will soon be paid for, 
and you will never miss the money. We make no charge for the safe, and when desired furnish a key with it. 

rnaran-i-oo Ck-rtr\ T^-v-^»liaT"»rf*a ^ ur Guarantee Certificate is the broadest and strongest 
Ulldl alllvC rfllUL JJ^LCIlall^C* ever given by a responsible house. We give one numbered 
and signed with every Diamond. We accept any Diamond ever sold by us as so much cash in exchange for other 
goods or a larger Diamond. No matter how long you have had a Diamond, it Is always good for original value with us. 

Tkori\rt T^Via Xr^»-«r Y/jqt» l>i rfV»f Write for our Catalogue, select your Diamond and 
£3CgiIl 1 He liCW X Cdl ivl^llL. begin saving your moneys Diamonds will be worth 
twenty per cent more than at present in one year from now. In the meantime, while saving you can have the 
pleasure and prestige of wearing a beautiful Diamond. 

f*\l t T» 1 Qfi 8 * {**»+€»] rkct-t i/> * s * ne flneB * ever published, and shows the finest line of Diamonds, 
KJXJ.L X*y\J*J KjcH.cL1\J& Lie Watches and Jewelry ever put on paper. We show many in- 
expensive articles, but nothing cheap or trashy. Every piece of goods that is given a place in our 
Catalogue must stand the test of Loftis quality, the highest standard in the trade. 




Souvenir. 



You will receive in addition to our 1905 Catalogue a copy of our 
Souvenir History of Diamonds, more than a million copies of whicn 

were distributed at our Diamond Cutting Exhibit in the Varied Industries Building at the 

Saint Louis Exposition. Write at once to insure receiving a copy. 



LOFTIS BROS. &> CO. (f^) 



Diamond Cutters and Manufacturing Jewelers 
Dept. A 82, 92 to 98 State Street, Chicago, 111. 



'A, 




xlvi 



RECREATION. 





DANGER IN SIGHT, "by Carl Rungius 
Size 11 x 14. Price 60c. 



Readers are now offered 
A NEW SERIES OF 

WILD ANIMAL 

and HUNTING 

PICTURES 

with which to 

DECORATE THEIR DENS 

Here are three sample illustrations 



U 

c 
a 



I 



THE LIST INCLUDES: 

DANGER IN SIGHT, Carl Rungius, size 11x14 
ANTICIPATION, W. H. Drake, size 11x14 
SPORT IN THE MARSHES, E. V. Brewer, size 26x32 
A DASH FOR COVER, Geo. A. King, size 22x28 
THE LAST STAND, Ernest T. Seton, size 16x20 
HIS ANTLERED MAJESTY, Carl Rungius, size 16x20 
THE FIRST SNOW, R. M. Shurtleff, size 20x24 
THE FRONTIER MAIL, De Cost Smith, size 26x32 

Sent to any point in the United States, Canada or Mexico, post-paid. 

No more attractive series of pictures has ever 
been offered to sportsmen, and the prices 
are such that any man of moderate means 
may well afford to ornament his walls with 
scenes that will bring home to himself and 
friends delightful recollections of days afield. 

Remit by P.O. or express money order, or New York draft. Address 

Gn QurcT r*Q 23 west 24th street 
• U. OI11CJLUO NEW YORK CITY 

These pictures are made by the Alfred 8. Campbell hxt Co., and are 
all exquisitely band-colored 



Colored 
$ .60 
1.50 
2. 
2. 

2.50 
2.50 

5- 
7.5o 





8P0RT IN THE MARSHES, oy E. V. Brewer A DASH £02 COVEH, by Geo. A. KIN© 

Siee 26x38, Price $2, Stee 28x88, Price ?2 



RECREATION. 



X 



Ivii 



Time to Think of Your Spring Fishing Trip 

Better go to Northern Maine 




The Eighth Annual Edition. 



it 




V 



Ready for distribution in March. 

Acknowledged to be the most complete 
and comprehensive publication of the kind 
issued. 

192 pages of information of inestimable 
value to every sportsman and vacationist. 
Magnificently illustrated in half-tones and 
colors. Copy mailed anywhere upon receipt 
of 10 cents in stamps to pay postage. 



Over 1,000 Lakes and Streams are reached by the 

Bangor & Aroostook Railroad 



Season Opens about Nay lOth 

Address, C. C. BROWN, Gen' 7 Pass > Agent, 



-Don't forget 

Dept. B., Bangor, Me. 



Rev. Mr. Spouter — Let me warn you, 
young man, against leading this frivolous 
life. What have you put away for a rainy 
day? 
Happy Jack — A mackintosh. — Exchange. 



Bride — Here is a telegram from papa ! 

Bridegroom (eagerly) — What does he 
say? 

Bride (reading) — Do not come home, and 
all will be forgiven. — Collier's. 



Tired Mother (to restless child) : Now, 
you set still ! I've druv yon 10 miles to en- 
joy this entertainment, and you shall enjoy 
it, if I have to pull every hair out of your 
head ! — Life. 



Customer — There was a chicken in one 
of the eggs you sold me yesterday. 

Storekeeper — Well, you haven't got any 
kick coming. Eggs are only 2 cents aniece, 
and chicken is 18 cents a pound. — Philadel- 
phia Telegraph. 



Hoax— They say the sultan of Turkey 
scares his wives nearly to death. 

Joax — Yes ; I've always heard that he was 
a harem-scarem sort of fellow. — Philadel- 
phia Record. 



Hostetter and his wife spent all their 
honeymoon riding horseback." 

"That's what thev call a bridle tour, I 
suppose."— Boston Globe, 




Shooting Jacket 

S3. 

GUARANTEED all wool, seamless, 
elastic, close fitting, but not bind- 
ing, comfortable and convenient. 
Designed especially for duck shooters, 
trap shooters, etc., but suitable for all 
out-door purposes. Must be seen to be 
appreciated. Made only in two colors 
— dead grass and Oxford gray. 

Send vis yovir address for one of 
ovir Gun Ce^tev-logs 

The H. H.KIFFE CO., 523 Bro^way.N.Y. 



xiviii RECREATION. 




Are You an 

Amateur 

Photographer? 



If so would you like a Camera 
that will photograph 

A whole range of mountains 

A whole sweep of river 

A whole army 

A whole fleet of ships 

A whole city 

Or any other """ast stretch of scenery or moving 
objects? THE SWING LENS DOES IT 



Ki Yista 




Is the thing. It lists at $30 



One of the greatest inventions of the age* 
Given as a premium for \ 2 subscriptions* 



For particulars address 

RECREATION 

23 West 24th Street NEW YORK CITY 






HIM l„ U""ll ,'UH.WIW'I 



RECREATION. 



xlix 



D. M. Tuttle Co. 




SELF- 
STARTING 
MOTORS 



The Tuttle Motor is the 
only reliable self-start- 
ing and reversing two- 
cylinder motor on the 
market. They may 
be left for hours, after 
which they may be 
started in either direc- 
tion by simply 
moving lever at- 
tached to com- 
mutator at top of 
front cylinder in 
the direction de- 
sired. This re- 
sult can not be 
accomplished by 
any two-cylinder 
motor with break 
spark ignition, 
as compression 
would be lost through leakage around the electrode arms. Our single-cylinder motors 
can also be started in either direction without the use of a crank by simply rocking the 
balance wheel by hand in the direction required. In all motors with multiple cylinders, 
each cylinder is independent of the others, having a separate spark coil, vaporizer and switch, 
so that one or more of them can be thrown out of action by its switch without disturbing 
the others, or the motor can be slowed down to its minimum speed by the lever on 
commutator. 



Launches 




We also 
build a complete line of 
high-grade launches in 
all styles of model, ranging from 1 6 feet to 60 feet. 



Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



Mention Recreation 



D. M. TUTTLE CO. 



10 CANAL STREET 
CANASTOTA, N. Y, 



I. 



RECREATION. 




FoIdiDg Canvas Boats 

were not satisfactory until the 



11 -foot Special 



was produced. It's a revelation 
in boat construction, nothing 
like it ever made. Nonsinkable 
Cant tip over. Puncture Prooj ' 
wear longer than a wooden boat. 
No repairs. No cost for storage, 
always ready, folds into a small 
neat package, carry by hand? 
used by the U. S. Navy. They are simple, wonderful. A thoroughly 
patented article. Beware of imitations. Made only by ourselves. A cat- 
alog of 1 00 engravings and 400 testimonials sent on receipt of 6 cents. 

Bottom Boards rest on the frame, not on the canvas, ribbed longitu- 
dinally and diagonally. They are stiffer and safer than a Wooden Boat 
because the lines are fuller, and are much easier to row or paddle. 

KING FOLDING CANVAS BOAT CO 

Mention Recreation. KALAMAZOO, MICH., U. S. A 



Interested Father : Did you tell her how 
sorry you were to leave her? 

Son: No, but I brought considerable 
pressure to bear on the subject — I think 
she understood. — Detroit Free Press. 



"Hope ye've got some variety about yer 
"He is considered a clever financier, is 

he not?" 

"Where did you get that idea?. He never 

beat anybody out of anything in his life !" 



"Miss Passay hasn't any beau, has she ?" 
"No, her past discourages suitors." 
"Why, there's nothing the matter with 

her past, is there?" 

"Nothing, except that it's . too long." — 

Philadelphia Ledger. 



"Your trouble, madam," said the physi- 
cian, "seems to be due to an excess of adi- 
pose tissue." 

"My goodness!" exclaimed Mrs. Plump- 
ton, "I wonder if that isn't what makes' me 
so awfully fat ?" — Chicago News. 



"How's yer husband the day," asked 
Mrs. Rafferty of Mrs. Muldoon. 

"Sure, an' he's no better," replied Mrs. 
Muldoon. "The doctor's afraid morality 
will set in." — Detroit Free Press. 



"How many bottles o' this will I have to 
take?" asked Farmer Corntossel. 

"Before you're cured?" said the medicine 
man. 

"No. Before I get my picture in the pa- 
per." — Washington Star. 



"Why," asked the fat policeman, "do you 
say the prisoner is a married man ?" 

"Because," replied the great detective, "he 
is wearing safety pins instead of suspender 
buttons." — Chicago News. 



"The Neuriches entertain a lot, don't 
they?" 

"Indeed they do. I was at their last do- 
ings, and the people I saw there were a 
job lot." — Cleveland Leader. 




Wo „ T d h eV'Auto-IVIarine Motor" $ 37.50 E gg e 



Weight 37 1-2 lbs. Height 11 1-4 in. 
CONVERT TOUR ROW BOAT INTO A LAUNCH 

Rated at I h.p. Has shown nearly 2 h.p. No valves, gears, 
springs or cams. Jump spark. Reversible. Speed control. Only 
three moving parts. Could not be made better if it cost live times 
as much. Order HOW — they are selling so fast you may be dis- 
appointed in the spring. Auto-Marine Motors from 1 to 20 h. p. 

Detroit Auto-Marine Co., 77 E. Congress St., Detroit, Mich 

Formerly Detroit Lackawana Co. 



RECREATION, 



li 



Take good care oi your 



A Prothero Gun Cabinet 

Made by 

JOHN N. PROTHERO, DuBOIS, PA., 
Makes it Easy. 



Send me 



15 new yearly Subscrip- 
tions to Recreation 

and I will send you a Cabinet listed at $15* 



Sample Copies for use in canvassing 
urnished on request 



Address Recreation 



23 W. 24th St. 



New York City 



"Say, pa," queried little Johnny Bumper- 
nickle, "what's a double chin?" 

"A conversation between your mother 
and grandmother, my son," replied the old 
man. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



"Why is Judkin's wife so jealous of his 
Stenographer?" 

"Well, you see, Mrs. Judkins was his 
stenographer before he married her, and 
she doesn't believe any woman can resist 
Judkins." — Chicago Record-Herald. 



Mabel — I wish I knew some way to make 
George forget me, for I can never marry 
him. 

Henry — Have you tried lending him 
money? — New Orleans Times-Democrat. 



She had a stall at the bazaar 

And mused, "What will the pastor buy?" 
With eyes that seemed to gaze afar 

The cashless pastor passed her by. 

—Judge. 



Sunday School Teacher : What com- 
mandment did Adam break when he ate 
the apple? 

Please sir, there weren't any command- 
ments at that time. — Argonaut. 

Chickens Free: Will give a pair of 
early hatched thoroughbred buff Plymouth 
Rocks for 4 new yearly subscriptions to 
Recreation, or a trio for 6. Ira D. Good- 
hue, Norfolk, Ohio. 





The Best 
Transmission 

Most automobile troubles arise 
in the transmission case. The 
transmission of the Cadillac has 
solved one of the most difficult 
problems of the automobile. It in- 
sures perfect running, reduces cost 
of maintenance and repairs and gives 
greater power. It is simple, strong 
and noiseless. 
Every part of the 



is built with care, 
thoroughness, and 
precision. The result is extreme 
durability and absence of annoyance 
to the operator. The speed range 
of the Cadillac is from four to 
thirty miles an hour, the maximum 
speed being easily maintained with 
four passengers. Let us send you 
Booklet K, and give you the name of 
the nearest Cadillac agency where 
you can satisfy yourself that nothing 
at double the money equals the 
Cadillac. Prices, $750 to $900. 

CADILLAC AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 
Detroit, Mich. 

Member Association Licensed Automobile Manufacturers 



Model I? 
$900 




Hi 



RECREATION. 



Canvas Covered 
Paddling Canoes 

New Canoe catalogue for 1905 
ready about January 15th. 



High Speed 
Launches 

12 to 30 miles per hour 



THE FR/SER HOLLOW 
SPAR & BOAT COMPANY 

GREENPORT, Suffolk Co.. Long Island, N.Y. 

J. G. FRASER, General Manager 



The Fraser 
Hollow 
Spruce Spars 

New Spar booklet and price list 
ready January 15th. 



Famous St. 
Lawrence 
River Skiffs 

Mention Recreation. 



I enclose photograph of a freak set of 
deer horns that are as pretty as any I ever 
saw. Each horn has its separate burr, and 
in pairs they are remarkably symmetrical. 

The deer was killed in this country by 
George Lucas, an old homesteader, and the 
mounted head is owned by Colonel Dickin- 
son, our county clerk. ^ 

Wade B. Smith, Petoskey, Mich. 



Some one asks what is tact. It is that 
feeling which prompts a woman to dig up 
the photograph of a friend who is coming 
to visit, from the bottom bureau drawer, 
and put it on the parlor mantel. — Atchison 
Globe. 



m«gitt|yiwifwB^^ torai 




x 



21 ft., $433 to $530; 18 ft., $360 to $475, Complete 

Not the lowest in price, but as low as consistent with 
quality and equipment. 1 5 different makes of Marine 
Engines in operation at our factor}', from %, to 60 H. P. 
Motor Boats 16 to 75 ft., equipped with any power. 
The Matthews Boat Co. 



Gutuloti IOc 



BASCOM, OHIO, U. S. A. 



I received the Blair camera sent me for 
subscriptions to Recreation and am well 
pleased with it. Shall try to get more sub- 
scriptions to Recreation. 

C. B. Moore, Jr., Macon, Ga. 

Eminent Surgeon — I operated on Mr. 
Bullion for appendicitis to-day. 

His Wife — Dear me ! I wonder who will 
have it next ! 

Eminent Surgeon (absentmindedly) — I 
don't know. I haven't decided yet. — Life. 

Indian Baskets: I have a few rare and 
beautiful baskets made by Alabama In- 
dians living near me, which I will ex- 
change for yearly subscriptions to Rec- 
reation at the rate of one basket for 4 
subscriptions. Many dealers in Indian 
curios sell these baskets for several dol- 
lars each. Here is a chance to get one 
free. Nothing finer for a Christmas 
present. Full description and photo for 
5 cents. These Indians also make from 
the inner fiber of Spanish moss, the best 
saddle blankets in the world. These 
blankets are cool to a horse's back, do 
not become hard and stiff and will last 
for years, as they are well made and 
positively will not rot, the inner fiber of 
Spanish moss being absolutely impervi- 
ous to moisture. Will give one blanket 
for 3 subscriptions to Recreation. The 
above articles are guaranteed to give sat- 
isfaction. E t F. Pope, Colmesneil, Tex, 



RECREATION. 



mi 




Build Your Own Boat 

BY THE BROOKS SYSTEM 

You can build your own Launch — Sailboat — 
Rowboat or Canoe in your leisure time — evenings 
— and the work will be a source of profit and 
pleasure. It's easy when we show you how. 

$12 covers the cost of a $50 Boat. Cheaper , 
boats cost less in proportion. Write us — we'll 
tell you how. 

The Brooks System consists of exact size 
Printed Patterns of every piece, with Detailed 
Instructions, a complete set of Working Illus- 
trations, showing eaeh step of the work, an 
itemized bill of Material required and how to 
secure it. 

Over six thousand amateurs successfully built 
boats by the Brooks System last year. Fifty per 
cent, of them have built their second boat. 
Many have established themselves in the Boat 
manufacturing business. 

Patterns of all kinds and sizes from 12 to 55 feet. 
Prices from $2.50 up — Catalog and particulars FREE. 
For 25c. 100 page catalog containing valuable infor- 
mation from the amateur yachtsman, showing several 
working illustrations of each boat, and a full set for 
one boat. Full line of knock-down and completed 
boats. When so ordered — Patterns are expressed, 
charges prepaid, C. O. D. to allow examination. 

BROOKS BOAT MANUFACTURING CO. 

Originators of the Pattern System 
Boat Building 

'502ShipSt.,BayCity, Mich., U.S. A.^ 




Effective sepia prints can be made with 
Willis & Clements' black platinum paper 
by adding one ounce of Di Nougio's sepia 
solution to 24 ounces of developer, the same 
as is used for black prints. The solution 
is used cold or lukewarm. Fix in 2 or 3 
baths of acetic acid l / 2 ounce to 32 ounces 
of water. Then wash thoroughly. 

Printing should not be carried quite so 
far as with black and white prints. 

The easiest way to straighten platinum 
prints so they will be flat is by ironing them 
on the back with an ordinary flatiron. It 
should not be hot enough to scratch the 
paper. 

R. L. Wadhams, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



The Fay &Bowen Motor 




is the machine described in 
"The Life-Boat" (of Eng- 
land) for Aug., 1904, as having 
successfully stood the severest tests. 

It is the machine that made the best record 
of any American motor in the English Reli- 
ability Trials last summer. 

No crank nor handle used for starting. 
Made in single or multi-cylinder patterns. 
A reliable and controllable motor. 

Send to us for copy of Life-Boat test and 
illustrated catalogue of motors and elegant 
motor-boats . 

Fay & Bowen Engine Co. 

74 Lake St., Geneva, N, Y„ U„ S. A. 



Is there any way of" removing paste irom 
the face . of a mounted photograph and 
mount? 

I. K. Bull, Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 

ANSWER. 

Yes, it can be removed with a damp cloth. 
Collodion papers will stand considerable 
water. On gelatine papers use only enough 
water to dampen the paste. Platinum prints 
are exceedingly tender and must not be 
rubbed. Powdered pumice stone rubbed on 
with the finger will remove paste or dirt 
from mounts. — Editor. 



Fishing in Rattlesnake and other creeks 
round here was excellent last summer. 

E. Heberlein, Apex, Mont. 



MULLINS' STEEL BOATS FOR SPORTSMEN 



-l!!x._ Air Chamber 

Cannot Sink 
No Repairs 
Always Ready 
Very Durable 
Low in Price 

"GET THERE*' Duck Boat. 14 feet long, 36 inch beam. Price, $20. 

■ Crated on Cars Salem. 

Complete illustrated Catalogue. Free on application. 

W. H. MULLINS, 228 Depot Street, SALEM, OHIO 

Mention Recreation. 




liv 



RECREATION. 




KEI'IIlilBgttHltl, Ala 

Hot Springs, Ark. 
Los Antfi'leH, Cal. 
San Francisco, Cal., 

1170 Market St. 
West Haven, Conn. 
Atlanta, Ga. 



Washington, D. C, 

311 N. Capitol St. 
Hwijrht, 111. r - 
Marion, I ml. 
]>es Moines, la. 
Crab Orchard, Ky. 
Portland, Me. 



For Liquor and 



Drug Using 



A scientific remedy which has been 
skillfully and successfully administered by 
medical specialists for the past 25 years 

AT THE FOLLOWING KBELBY INSTITUTES: 



Lexington, Mass. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
St. Louis, Mo., 

8808 Locust St. 
Boulder, Mont. 
North Conway, N. II. 
Buffalo, N. Y.- 



White Plains, N. Y. 
Columbus, O., 

]>ennison Ave. 
Portland, Ore. 
Philadelphia, Pa., 

813 N. Broad St. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



Pittsburg. Pa., 

4246 Fifth Ave. 
Prov idence, R. 1. 
Richmond, Va. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Waukesha, Wis. 
Toronto, Ont. 




Your Own 



Powder 



We will send you practical formula for 
the best Smokeless Powder for $2. 
Perfectly safe to make. No apparatus 
required. Pound costs 30c« or less. 
Makes 200 charges. Free sample of 
powder by express or one pound for $ 1 , 
Ask for testimonials and information. 
Mention Recreation 

Blatchley & Campbell 

IV % Chemists, Wcllsboro, Pa. 



B. L. McKay is the Izaak Walton of the 
South Side and there is no one in "Hannibal 
who goes fishing oftener than he. 

N. A., Hannibal, Mo. 



A writer finds to write is might, 

In short, he sees, ere long, 
'Tis right to write to write what's right, 

Yet right to right the wrong. 

— London Globe. 



The Ball-Bearing Oarlock 

A device that will do for the rowboat 
what the ball-bearing did for the bicycle. 
Every ounce of energy 'utilized. No' 
clanking or squeaking, in fact 
ABSOLUTELY NOISELESS AND 
FRICTIONLESS. The Ideal Oarlock for 
Hunting and Pishing. Furnished either 
for tight or loose oars. Tf your dealer 
does not handle, write for. descriptive 
circular and prices. Mention Kecrea- 



T. H. GARRETT, Jr., Clark St., AUBURN N. Y. 




The L.A.S. furnishes cloth 
posters in any number de- 
sired, freeof change, offering 
a reward of $10 for each 
conviction for a violation of 
a game law. These posters 
have done great good wher= 
ever placed in deterring 
would = be law breakers from 
committing offences against 
the game, fish, and forest 
laws. Are you not willing 
to put up some of these 
posters? If so, how many? 



For 




SIMPLICITY 

POWER 

STRENGTH 

and beauty, of finish 




Leads the world. 
Write for catalog. 

Mention Recreation 

Iowa Marine Gas 
Engine Works 

Bellcvue, Iowa. 




Send for catalogue of our full line of Folding 
Canvas Boats and Canoes, which have been 
adopted by Governments of United States, Can- 
AC ME folding boat co., MiAMisBUKO. o. ad / and E y ngland . j ust filled an order for U. S. 

Government, who prefer our boats. Received medal and award at Chicago World's 
Fair. If you investigate we will get your order. Mention Recreation. 

Acme Folding Boat Company, MieLmisbvirg, €>• 



RECREATION. 



lv 



International 
Dentifrice 



One-Third 

of a 
Century 

Standard 

of the 




The Watertown, N. Y., Standard, of No- 
vember 4, in reporting a squirrel hunt in 
which 16 men participated, led by Harold 
Barnes and Mr. McPhee, says the affair 
was a great success and that it should be 
repeated every year. 

One can scarcely expect anything else 
than that ignorant men will make swine of 
themselves when the local press commends 
them for so doing at every opportunity. 
There are many men who would kill their 
mother's canary in order to get their names. 
in the local newspapers. If a crowd can 
go out and kill gray squirrels, red squir- 
rels, blue jays, robins and such like,, and 
then get a free supper for killing more 
than the other fellows do, and a big puff 
in the local newspaper besides, they would 
stay up all night to get in the butchering 
match. 



When a customer, a friend of mine, asked 
a Toronto firm about the automatic, they 
told him they wouldn't handle it, because 
there was a bill going through to prohibit 
its use. Somebody's doing something here 
in Canada. 

Arthur L. Phelps, Lindsay, Ontario. 



ffiR __ PAID FOR RARE 1853 QUARTERS; $4 paid 
«pO«/0 for 1804 dimes; $15 paid for 1858 dollars; h\& 
prices paid for hundreds of other dates ; keep all money coined 
before 1879 and send ten cents at once for a set 01 two coin and 
Stamp value books. It may mean a fortune to you. Address 
C F. Clarke, Agent, Le Roy, N.Y., Dept. 3. 




How a 



Thousand 
Dollars 

Made a 

Million 

An Illustrated Booklet 
Sent Absolutely Free 

to Anybody 
addressing 

W. G. Vanderbilt 

No. 100 "William St. 
New York City 



I received the Bristol steel rod last week. 
I can not see how you can give such valu- 
able premiums as you do. Thank you much, 
much. 

A. G. Johnson, Albany, N. Y. 



Shakespeare reel and rod received yester- 
day. They are the finest goods on the mar- 
ket and you certainly make good with your 
premiums. Accept my sincere thanks and 
I wish you continued success. 

S. B. Kauffman, Lima, Ohio. 



CHAS. W. EWOS, Jr. 



^ 



Large list of yachts of all types for sale or charter. 
Marine Insurance. State requirements and list of 
boats will be sent to meet them. High class sailing- 
masters, engineers, stewards, cooks and all assist- 
ants furnished. Mention Recreation. 

280 Broadway, Telephone 301 Franklin N. T. City 



BlC MONEY 

Can now be made in certain stocks by anyone 
with a capital of $5 to $10 a Month. We are in 

position to give you the only reliable inside in- 
formation. Write to-day. 

UNION SECURITY CO. 



604 Gaff BIdg. 



Chicago, III* 



ivi 



RECREATION. 




/ 



/- 



■-- 



/ 



w s 






;y 




*=Sl£_iSI 



"JUST RESTING" 

Was the way a dear old grandmother described 
her trip to California on the 

Golden State Limited 

" For once in my life I knew what it was to sit in the Lap 
of Luxury. I just lay back and let that strange western world 
glide by me — no effort — no worry— no strain upon either mind 
or body. I enjoyed every blessed minute, and was actually less 
tired when we reached Los Angeles, than when I left Chicago." 

BEGINNING December 25th, Golden State Limited leaves Chicago daily 
8.00 p. m., St. Louis 9.30 p. m., Kansas City 10.40 a. m. Arrives Los Angeles 
2.45 p. m., third day after. 

It runs via El Paso and Southern Pacific line through New Mexico — most Southerly 
route. Every mile is a mile away from winter. 

Send six cents in stamps for illustrated book describing train and service and 
reserve berths NOW, 

JOHN SEBASTIAN, Passenger Traffic Manager, 
Rock Island System, Chicago. 



RECREATION. 






..JBflS-' 



St. Johns River Service between 

Jacksonville and Sanford, Fla., 

and Intermediate Landings 



The " Clyde Line" is the favorite route 
between New York, Boston, Phila- 
delphia and Eastern Points, and 
Charleston, S. C, and Jackson- 
ville, Fla., making direct connection 
for all points South and Southwest. 



FAST MODERN 

STEAMSHIPS AND 

SUPERIOR SERVICE 



enerai Agents 

tscie St. New YoftK, 



lviii 



RECREATION. 



Lovers of the Beautiful 

would not be without our 

Tropical Butterfly Fictnres 

made up of Genuine Butterflie's in 
rich Picture Frames, (no pins used). 
BUTTERFLIES of every color. Butter- 
flies from all countries. Prices low. Par- 
ticulars free. Butterfly Nets, Setting 
boards, etc. Finest quality, lowest prices. 
Mariposa Novelty CO., 4336 Langloy Av., Chicago 

Gla>.ss Eyes for 
Stviffed Birds, 
and Animals 
Oologists'aLrvd 
Entomologists' 
Svipplies 

Send 5c. in stamps for catalogue 

FRED. KAEMPFER, %lUI^m- 

Taxidermy work done in all its branches 

Mention Recreation 




aterials 




Bernard 

Buyer of Raw Furs and 
Ginseng Root. 

50 Bleeeker St., New York. 



Quotations sent on request. 



NAVAJO BLANKETS 

Indian Beadwork, Baskets, Pottery. 
Moccasins, Alaskan Curios, Mexi- 
can Goods, Beads, Basket Material. 
If it's Indian we have it 

Send 6c. Stamps for Catalogue. 

BENHAM INDIAN TRADING CO. 

38 West 42d Street, New York City 

Mention Recreation. 




F 



INE MOUNTED GAME HEADS. 
BIRDS, ETC., for sale at unheard-of prices. 
Send 10 cents for photos. 
JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine, 



It is easy enough to be pleasant 
When your automobile's in trim, 

But the man worth while 

Is the man who can smile 

When he has to go home on a rim. 

— Exchange. 



Do mo Ever snoot dims? 

■ If so, you should have a copy 
of the group of 

Duck Shooting Pictures 

shown on pages 370, 371 and 
372 of the December issue of 
Recreation. I had 300 Ar= 
list's Proofs made from these 
plates before running them in 
the magazine. 

These are printed on one 
sheet of heavy enameled paper, 
placed end to end, so that they 
may be framed as one picture, 
and together they make a 
beautiful panel decoration, 
and a delightful reminder of 
happy days on the marsh or in 
the blinds. The set sells at 
$1. each. 

HddrcssRecrcatiOI(23W.24tHt.,ii.Y. 



For Sale — Colts New Navy Revolver 
blued, 38 caliber, jointless frame, simul- 
taneous, ejector, 4^2 inch barrels, 6 shots, 
also Ideal reloading tools, belt and hols- 
ter; all in perfect condition, $11. Martin 
Epler, Otter Tail, Otter Tail Co., Minn. 



Wanted — Position on sheep or cattle 
ranch by a young man who has served a 
long term in the army in the Philippines 
and China. G. C. Shumaker, U. S. Arse- 
nal, Pittsburg, Pa. 



Date, 



190 



Q. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 23 West 24th St. New York. 
Herewith find $1.00 for which olease send me RECREATION one year 

beginning with „ = number, 

Name, 



Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT, AND SEND IN 



recreation: 



lix 



Catalogue of Firearms 

FOR SALE BY 

Van Allen Lyman, 256 Hudson Ave., Albany,N.Y. 

The following are all in absolutely perfect condition in 
every way, unless otherwise stated 7 . 

Sftiith & Wesson 32-44 target revolver, 6% inch barrel, blue 
finish, weight 2 lbs., 12 oz. Finish worn off"in places, inside 
of barrel nearly like new. 

Holsterand belt and Ideal reloading tools' cartridges, empty 
shells, primers — to go with theieyolver. Price for the lot $10. 

Stevens' "Favorite" rifle .22 caliber, almost like new-, Win- 
chester sights. Price $-1.35. 

H. & R. single barrel, 12 gauge, automatic ejector shot gun. 
Absolutely perfect, with canvas shell belt. Price $3-75- 

Colt .31 caliber powder and ball revolver, in serviceable 
shooting condition. Sear has been removed and cylinder has 
to be turned by hand. Price $1.75. 

Hopkins & Allen .38 caliber revolver, 5-shot, double action, 
nickle finish, perfect inside, good condition outside, 2]/ 2 inch 
barrel. Price $1.25. 

Hopkins & Allen .22 caliber revolver, double action, nickel 
finish, 7-shot, perfect i 1 every way, 4% in. barrel. Price $1.25. 

Winchester bullet mould, .38 long caliber, new and perfect. 
Cost $t 50 — will sell ior 75c. 

Want S. & \V. .38 military revolver. • 

Terms are cash in advance. Money returned immediately 
if goods prove unsatisfactory. Goods will be sent on approval 
CO. 1). if desired, on reoept of money to cover express charges 
both ways. Detailed information about any of the foregoing 
for stamp. 

I am more than pleased with Recreation. 
It is the best sportsmen's periodical I ever 
saw. I like the way you score the game 
hogs. They are not decent men ; give it to 
them. 

A. L. Belch, Mannington, W. Va. 



I enjoy the way you roast. the game hogs. 
We have a few here, but they are getting 
ashamed of themselves. I have been a 
reader of Recreation over 2 years and wait 
anxiously for it every month. 

W. H. Adams, Sharpsville, Pa. 



You are doing a splendid work, and one 
all decent sportsmen appreciate highly. 
Keep it up. Good luck to you. 

C. L. Wilson, Philadelphia, Pa. 



I enjoy reading Recreation 'more than 
any other magazine I take, especially the 
gun and natural history departments. May 
you live long to continue your good work. 
Henry Radcliffe, Saypo, Mont. 



Your magazine is the leading sports- 
men's periodical, and I am highly in 
favor of your position in relation to the 
game hog. The camera is a great agent in 
promoting a healthy spirit toward -game 
protection. '- ■■' 

D. E. Heywood, Rangeley, Me. 



My brother and I take Recreation, and 
it is the magazine for real sportsmen. I ad- 
mire your stand against game hogs and re- 
peating shot guns. 

C. M. Brown, Ocotlan, Oaxaca, Mexico. 



I have been a reader of Recreation some 
time. Am much interested in the guns and 
ammunition department; also in the roast- 
ing of game hogs and the stand you take 
against the automatic gun. I sincerely hope 
you will be successful in the death of both. 
Guy Bingham, Janvesville, Wis. 



Mounting a 
Wild-Cat. 







Why not mount your own 

Trophies? During the Shooting 
Season you will secure many line birds and animals. Mount 
them for your home and den. Save taxidermist's bills. En- 
joy your spare time and increase your income, 

IT PAYS. Hundreds of leading sportsmen have taken 
our course, and are paying all gun and sporting expenses by 
selling their mounted specimens and doing work for others. 
You can do as well. If you want the most profitable of all 
"side lines," learn Taxidermy. We can teach you by 
mail. Our rates are reasonable and we positively guar- 
antee success. Endorsed by all sporting magazines in 
America. If you are a hunter, angler, or nature-lover, you 
will be interested in our new catalogue. It's yours for 
the asking. Write for one to-day. Mention Recreation 

The Northwestern School of Taxidermy 

Suite A, Com. National Bank - Omaha, Neb. 

The only School of Taxidermy in the World. 



Mongolian pheasant shooting has not been 
a success this year. Birds are scarce. 
Sportsmen blame the farmers for hunting 
out of season, but I think it is a case of 
6 of one and half a dozen of the other. 
Most of our sportsmen go out and kill 75 
to 100 ducks each, fro-m Saturday till Sun- 
day night, and then sell them in the market ; 
so I have little sympathy for these men if 
they don't get good pheasant shooting. 

F. A. Stuhr, Portland, Ore. 




Blauvelt Knitting Co., Newark, N. J., 

Dear Sirs, A number of members of our 
gun club saw me use my coat at several 
shoots last spring and were much pleased 
with it. They said it was the best coat they 
had ever seen, combining warmth, comfort 
and neatness. They want me to get a price 
on 22 coats same color and the same in 
every detail. Yours truly, 

Chas. Smith, Newark, N. J. 



INDIAN 

CURIOS 

' Wholesale & Retail 
Curio Dealers' 
tttJPPLY Depot. 
Bead. Work, Baskets, Elk Teeth, Mexican 
Goods, Beads, Fossils, Minerals, Arrow 
Heads. Pottery, Alaska Ivories, Shells. 
Auates, Photos, Great Stock, Bit Oata. 5c, 
stamps. Mention Recreation. II adealei 
say so. L w ST1LWELL, 

Deadwood ... , So. Dakota 



DOES YOUR RIFLE SHOOT OK? 

Surprising Results are 
secured by using this 
new Improvement! It 
will please you, and 
improve the accuracy 
of your rifle. A stamp 
brings guarantee, cir- 
culars, terms, etc A 

trial will convince you I 





wm 



'VENTED" \ PftTENT 

APPLIED 
FOR 




b 



RECREATION. 



m 



IDEAL N22 RE & DE-CAPPEFO 

Straight Line Movement. Used as a bench or hand tool. Lever 

"A" folds over so tool may be carried in pocket. Weighs but 

eight ounces. Is strong and powerful. Seats the primers 

easily and positively to the bottom of pocket, which prevents misfires. 

Ejects old primer and seats new one without removing the shell, 

which is handled but once to perform the two operations, enabling the operator to do nearly 

twice the work in a given time. Now ready 25-35, 25-36, 30-30, 30-40 Krag, 30-45 Springfield 

(headless), 32-40, 38-55. Ask your dealers. If they will not serve you send cash to 

THE IDEAL MFG. CO., 12 U. St., New Haven, Conn., U. S. A. 

The PHIL B. BEKEART CO., of San Francisco, Cal., Agents for Pacific Coast 

When you write kindly mention Recreation 



First Physician : So the operation was 
just in the nick of time?. 

Second Physician: Yes, in another 24 
hours the patient would have recovered 
without it. — Harper's Bazar. 



"Well," said the commander of the Japa- 
nese force, "I can see your finish." 

"Wrong!" gleefully cried the simple 
minded Russian commander, "not one of us 
is Finnish. We're all Siberian Cossacks."— 
The Philadelphia Press. 



Ways of big men oft remind us 
We might be as dumb as they ; 

And, departing, leave behind us 
Wise things that we didn't say. 

—Life. 



She — Suppose when you're out with a 
bunch of joke writers you put down all the 
funny things they say, and try to sell them 
afterward. 

He — No, indeed. They have all been sold 
before. — Boston Globe. 



A Press Button Hunting Knife 

Is one of the best articles a hunter ever carried 




It has a 4 Inch Blade made of the Best Silver Steel 

The knife cannot come open in your pocket. It cannot close on your hand when in use. It opens and closes 
only when 

YOU PRESS THE BUTTON 

If you once use one of these knives you will never use any other. You can get one as a premium for 

3 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS TO RECREATION 

Sample Copies furnished on request. 

RECREATION, 23 West 24th Street, New York 



RECREATION. 



lxi 




Have You a Dog ? 

We will send, if you mention its 
breed, 1'nlk Miller's Great Hook on 
Dogs ; How to Take Care of Them ; 
Sen. Vest's Eloquent Tribute to a 
Dog, and A Yellow Dog's Love lor 
a Nigger ((he famous poem) all for 
10 cents, just to advertise Sergeant's 
Famous Dog Iteniedies. Address 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO. 
845 Main Street, Richmond, Va. 



Squabs are raised in i month, brinsj big 
prices. Eager market. Astonishing 
profits. Easy for women and invalids 
Use your spare time profitably. Small 
space and capital. Here is something 
worth looking into. Facts given in our 
FREE BOOK, "How to make money 
_ with Squabs " PLYMOUTH ROCK 
>QUAB CO., 289 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Living Wild Animals & Game Birds 

collected and furnished for 
Scientific and Propagating 
Purposes. Write for what 
you want. No catalogue 
issued. 

Chas, Payne 

Naturalist 
Box 913, Wichita,Kan. 






«jj. BLAK 

Buyer and Exporter of 

EZJL'EW FURS 
i WEST THIRD ST. 

NEW YORK 

Write for price list. 




E. V. Rogers, Deputy State Fish and 
Game Warden and Local Warden of this 
League, who lives at Cadiz, Ohio 
offers a reward of $io for evidence that 
will convict any person of a violation of the 
game or fish laws of that State. Mr. Rogers 
is a zealous worker in the cause of game 
and fish protection, and every sportsman in 
his county should co-operate with him with- 
out pecuniary reward. It is, however, very 
geenrous of Mr. Rogers to make this offer, 
and it is hoped it may inspire many people 
to give such information as will aid in 
bringing the guilty persons to justice. 

Dr. Cutts — I made an awful mistake 
when I diagnosed that man's case as appen- 
dicitis. 

Dr. Slash — What did the operation dis- 
close? 

Dr. Cutts — That he didn't have a cent- 
Cleveland Ledger. 



TAXIDERMISTS a.nd FURRIERS 

Fvir and Curio Dealers WKolesaJe and Reta.il 

Every Description of Work in our Line done to Order. >. 

We carry a full line of Ladies' Furs, and will be pleased to 
send you anything you may wish in this line C. O. D., with 
privilege of examination. Give us a trial on making up your 
Furs. We guarantee that you will be more than pleased with 
anything we may do for you. 

A mounted Deer, Antelope, Mountain Sheep head, Bear, Lion, 
Wolf or Fox head, or a Fur lap-robe, the warmest and best robe one 
can get, or a handsome Lion, Bear, Wolf, Wild Cat, or Fox Rug, or 
a nice Fur Muff, Boa, or Scarf, makes abeautiful and always welcome 
Christmas present, or a pair of Indian moccasins, the most comfor- 
table and durable house slipper possible. We have them. 

All work guaranteed moth proof. We have our own tannery 

All kinds ot tanning done to order. 

Highest prices paid for raw furs. Taxidermists' supplies 

Please mention Recueation 

McFADDEN & SON 

F 1632 Champa St. - Denver, 

"I can't imagine anything harder than 
to tell a girl you love her. It takes cour- 
age." 

"Yes, but think of the courage it takes 
to tell a girl you don't love her after you've 
once told her you did." — Philadelphia Press. 



"Now," said the professor, "what is your 
idea of 'a nervous force'?" 

"The police when they are being investi- 
gated," replied the bright student. — Phila- 
delphia Press. 

IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 



Colo. 



Briggs — I wonder why a dentist calls his 
office a dental parlor? 

Diggs — I don't know. Drawing room 
would be more appropriate. — Chicago 

News. 



"So Silas was charged with havin' 7 
wives! Was th' judge severe on him?" 

"Awful ! He discharged him, with all 7 
of his wives waitin' fer him in th' corridor." 
—Judge. 



"Collan-Oil" 

preserves leather and 
renders shoes and 
harness positively 

WATERPROOF 

Used by the U. S 

the Army and Navy 

and National Guard. 

Send 25c. for trial can. 

AGENTS WANTED 

Write for terms and circulars 

J. R. BUCKELEW 
Dept. a. jjJ Chambers St., N. Y. 



Waterproof 

LEATHER 

DRESSING 

.< ." AND . 

RUST 

PREVENTER 



RECREATION. 



FOR 37 YEARS A STANDARD PIANO." 

The Wing Piano 

vatt "Mrrnn "TUTQ RPiOTT if you intend to buy .a piano, a 

I \J\J r^CCL/ 1 niO LJ\JKJL\. book — not a catalogue — that gives you all the 
information possessed by experts. It makes the selection of a piano easy. If read carefully, 
it will make you a judge of tone, action, workmanship, and finish; will tell you how .to know 
good from bad. It describes the materials used; gives pictures of all the different parts, and 
tells how they should be made and put together. It is the only book of its kind ever pub- 
lished. It contains 116 large pages, and is named "The Book of Complete Information About 
Pianos." We send it free to anyone wishing to buy a piano. Write for it. 

QAUE f?T?01\/r <fcinn TO $700 We make the WING PIANO and sell it 
OZ\ V d FrvvyiVl >pi\J\J 1 V-/ 4>Z,UVJ ourselves. It goes direct from our factory 
to your home. We do not employ any agents or salesmen. When you buy the WING PIANO 
you pay the actual cost of construction and our small wholesale profit. This profit is small 
because we sell thousands of pianos yearly. Most retail stores sell no more than twelve to 
twenty pianos yearly, and must charge from $ioo to $200 profit on each. They can't help it. 




A Wing style — 45 other styles to select from. 
QlnMT OTM TDTAT WE PAY FREIGHT. NO MONEY IN ADVANCE We 
OE-IN 1 VJIN 1 JK1/\L w in send any WING PIANO to any part of the United 
States on trial. We pay freight in advance and do not ask for any advance payment or de- 
posit. If the piano is not satisfactory after -tzventy days' trial in your home, we take it back 
entirely at our expense. You pay us nothing unless you keep the piano. There is absolutely 
no risk or expense to you. Old instruments taken in exchange. EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS 

INSTRUMENTAL ATTACHMENT & ; „r Ka„?rT && 

perfectly the tones of the mandolin, guitar, harp, zither and banjo. 

IN 37 YEARS 36,000 PIANOS c\^slrs & \n°evlry part°°of ^the ^mted 
States. WING PIANOS are guaranteed for twelve years against any defect in tone, action, 
workmanship, or material. 

\X71r\Ff ORf"" A^T^ ^ re i ust as carefully made as Wing Pianos. They have a 

WllNVJ v-/lvvJ/xlNO sweet, powerful, lasting tone, easy action, very handsome 

appearance, need no tuning. Wing Organs are sold direct from the factory, sent on trial; 

are sold on easy monthly payments. For catalogue and prices write to 



WING & SON, 



226 and 228 East I2th St., 
NEW YORK. 
J868-37th Year— 1905. 




RECREATION. 



Ixm 



Newhouse Steel Traps 

Do you know the NewllOUSe Trap Spring? It has a world- 
wide reputation and is absolutely guaranteed. The Newhouse 

Trap is made in all the regular numbers and 

i • I • te s. NEWHOUSE 

several special sizes, onoda community 

Every genuine Newhouse Trap is stamped n. y. 




No. 3% Otter Trap. For those who wish a large single spring trap. 

Write for illustrated catalogue. Mention Recreation. 



Oneida Community (Ltd.) 



!. Y. 



Send 25 cents for "Trapper's Guide," which describes habits of animals and best ways to catch them. 



About the only vacation I get is reading 
in Recreation about some other fellow's 
trip to the Canadian Rockies or elsewhere. 
That is almost as much pleasure as the 
actual trip and it only costs $1 a year for 
several trips each month. Please keep 
Recreation coming 2 years more, for which 
payment is enclosed. 

Howard E. Adt, New Haven, Conn. 



"Hockey as a Game for Women" is the 
title of a book recently issued by Messrs. 
Longmans, Green & Co., 91 Fifth Ave., 
New York. It contains full and complete 
instructions which it would seem should 
enable any woman to know the game after 
a careful reading of this book and a few 
days of study and practice. 

The book will be sent by mail postpaid on 
receipt of 80 cents. 



Practical Common Sense CAMP 
ill 6 Sizes. STOVE 

Either with or with- 
out oven. The light- 
est, strongest, most 
compact, practical 
stove made. Cast 
combination sheet 
Steel top, smooth out- 
side, heavy lining in 
fire box and around 
oven, holds its shape, telescopic pipe carried inside the 
stove. Burns large wood and keeps fire longer than any 
other. Used by over 9,000 campers and only one stove 
returned. 

Foi catalogue giving full particulars, mention Recrea- 
tion and address 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, III. 




Office Boy (under notice to leave) — ■ 
Please, sir, may I have a day off next Mon- 
day? I'd like to go to a funeral. 

Employer — H'h ; and whose funeral 
would you like to go to? 

O. B.— Yours !— Judy. 



Aunt Jane— Edith, didn't I see Mr. 
Sweetser kissing you in the hall last night? 

Edith — Yes, but it was only in remem- 
brance of former days. 

A sort of souvenir spoon, I presume you 
mean. — Boston Transcript. 



I know of no surer way to please my 
friends than to present each with a sub- 
scription to Recreation, the most valua- 
ble sporting magazine I have yet seen. 

C. I. Parker, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Your face has a 
right to health and 
comfort. Insist on 
Williams' Shaving 
Soap. 

Williams' Shaving Sticks and Tablets sold everywhere. 
The J. B. Williams Co., Glastonbury, Conn. 



lxiv 



RECREATION. 




This cut shows Forend Ejector, Simplest on earth, only three parts, Always works. 





Above cuts show the doable thick nitro breech with cross bolt and under fastening, 

the narrow skeleton rib, 6 ounces lighter than any other, tapering 

gracefully from breech to muzzle* 




The simplest, most durable and fastest lock in the world. 

If you don't know what gun to buy order an Ithaca and a gun of 
any other make, compare them, and if the Ithaca is not the best by 
all odds, return it* N. B. — The Ithaca Sticks. 

Send for Art" Catalog and Special prices on 16 Grade Guns, $17,75 to $300, 
Mention Recreation. 







RECREATION. 



lxv 



Marble's Revolver Rod 

This is a handy and handsome little tool 
for men who take pride in their arms. The 
rod proper is made of solid brass with our 
patented steel swivel. The hollow nickeled 
handle will hold a Marble cleaner. 

For 7 Yi inch, or 5^ inch barrel and under, 
choice of ends, price postpaid, $1.00. Men- 
tion caliber. Joints are 4 inches long. Ex- 
tra joints, 15c; ends, 15c. 

Marble's Brass Rifle Rod with strong 
steel joints, postpaid, $1.00. 




Marble's Rifle Cleaner 




sAJ 




|8|nisz8Rw wsassr wm%$f 



(Garrison's Patent) Brass gauze washers on a spiral spring steel wire. 

We knew after the fiist time we tried this cleaner that it was a wonderful implement and that 
we would have a large sale for it. But we did not guess big enough, for it is selling faster than 
any new specialty we ever put out. Why ? Because it takes out every particle of burned smoke- 
less powder and lead. Because it does the work faster and easier than any other cleaner. Because 
it is cheaper, for one will last a man a lifetime. We have one we have used over 200 times in clean- 
ing rifles. It is still in just as good condition for service as ever. It is kept this way by oc- 
casional scraping and turning of the washers. We guarantee that it will not harm your rifle. 

Price postpaid, 5©C. Mention Caliber. 

Send for catalogue of extra quality specialties. Mention Recreation. 

Marble Safety Axe Co* t Dept* A f Gladstone, Mich* 



I received the Yawman & Erbe automa- 
tic reel O.K. and am much pleased with it. 
It is worth 20 times the trouble or work 
it takes to get up a club. 

M. P. Keefe, Columbus, Ohio. 



I received my Bristol rod which you 
sent me for a premium. It is satisfactory 
in every way and I feel well repaid for my 
work in getting up the club. 

Edwin F. Fowler, Patten, Me. 



The J. C. hand trap received. Accept 
my thanks. Gave it a trial to-day and it 
works very satisfactorily. 

W. J. Baldwin, Onley, L Va. 



Mary had a little oil 

To help the fire to mount, 

And everywhere that Mary went 
Would be quite hard to count. 

— New York Times. 



Replying to the inquiry of R. Dewing, 

San Francisco, in December Recreation, 

beg to state that I use a Hotchkiss 6 shot 

carbine, bolt action.' / 

T. J. Jochim, Brooklyn, L. I. 



Mr. John Watkins and his son, of this 
place, spent 2 months of last summer camp- 
ing and fishing, and caught a reasonable 
number of fish. 

C. S. N., Uion, N. Y. 



T5he 
DAVENPORT 

1905 MODELS 





^m§)j 



Embody all the latest im- 
provements in modern gun 
construction. They 
are the stan- 
dard of ex- 
cellency. 



W. H Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. 




Ixvi 



RECREATION. 




AUER GUNS 



It was unfortunate that we were not able 
to deliver all the SAUER guns last year to 
those sportsmen who ordered them. 

We wish to thank them for their orders 
and patience in waiting. 

In 1905 we shall carry a generous stock 
and hope to deliver guns of all weights and 

sizes PROMPTLY 



NO BETTER GUNS IN THE WORLD 
FOR THE MONEY 



Booklet on application 



Mention Recreation 



Schoverling, Daly & Gales 

302-304 Broadway, New York 



Herewith I enclose check to renew my 
subscription to Recreation, the best maga- 
zine in the world. It contains more infor- 
mation than all the other sportsmen's jour- 
nals published in America. 

Charles H. Otis, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



You are made of the light stuff, and I 
am glad there is at least one man who is 
not afraid to roast the fish and game hogs 
as they deserve. You do not give it to 
them any too hard. 

M. R. Randall, Waupaca, Wis. 

IN ANSWERING ADS. PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 



I am well pleased with Recreation, ana 
consider it one of the best sportsmen's 
periodicals published. All parts of it are 
good and the subjects are treated in an able 
manner. I especially approve the thorough 
discussion allowed in the gun and ammuni- 
tion department. Much valuable informa- 
tion comes to sportsmen thereby. 

Frank J. Blackburn, Azusa, Cal. 



Wife — If I should die what would you 
do? 

Husband — I'd be almost crazy. 

Wife—Would you marry again? 

Husband — No, I shouldn't be so crazy as 
that.— Ex. 



THE MALCOLM RIFLE TELESCOPIC SIGHT 

IS ACKNOWLEDGED TO BE THE BEST PLACED ON THE MARKET 





We are Originators not Imitators. All of our Outfits are first slass 
my advice regarding the best power and length Tube for Hunting or Target 
purposes given when requested. SEND FOR OUR LA TEST CA TALOGUE. 

Mention Recreation. 

THE MALCOLM RIFLE TELESCOPE MFG. CO. 



Established 1857 



F. T. CORNISH, Mgr. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y., nJ. 3. ft. 



RECREATION. 



Ixvn 



One of the 9 



Built for Business 
"A" GRADE $8Q LIST 

L: offering this gun to the public, we have combined 

ALL Oi^ THE DISTINCTIVE IHPROVEHENTS 

which have gained for the " Syracuse" its present prominent position 
among American Arms. 



ife 



"A" GRADE 

Condensed Description. 

BARRELS— Fine quality of Damascus Steel, or if desired, we will 
furnish Krupp Fluid Pressed Steel Barrels, made at the Krupp 
Works, Essen, Germany, and imported to our order. 

STOCK — Imported Italian Walnut, finely figured and dark rich color. 
Full pistol or Straight Grip as desired. 

AUTOMATIC EJECTOR— With our Patent Non-Ejector device 
which allows the gun to be instantly changed from an Auto- 
matic to a Non-Automatic Ejector. 

This model gun is handsomely engraved and cleanly finished, and will 
compare favorably with any gun on the market listing at $ 100.00. 

All "Syracuse" guns fur 1905 will be built with our New Compensat- 
ing Double Cross Bolt; and Frames Inletted into Stock, thus 
preventing the spreading or splitting of same. 

Catalogue yours for the asking. Mention '■'■Recreation" 

SYRACUSE ARMS CO. Syracuse, n. y. 



Ixviii 



RECREATION. 



Here Is Another ! 



If you will send me i 5 yearly subscriptions to 




EC 





ATION 



I will send you a high-grade, powerful 



Fie 





ass 



Listed at $15 



A field glass is indispensable to every hunter, and 
this is one of the latest and best on the market for 
the price. I have but a few of these instruments on 
hand and the offer will be withdrawn as soon as the 
supply is exhausted. Therefore, if you want one 
start immediately. Sample copies of Recreation 
for use in canvassing furnished on apph'ca^^ 



Address RECREATION, 23 






RECREATION. 



lxix 




SAVAGE JUNIOR 



If is "Savage Quality" all Through 



Price 

4. 



While the Savage "Junior" is a bolt action rifle, it is 
radically different than any other rifle of this type on 
the market. Like all other Savage rifles it is distinctly 
ingenious and workmanship the best. Shoots short 
long and long rifle cartridges. Perfect accuracy guar- 
anteed. If your dealer can not supply you, send us $4. 
and we will deliver to any address in U. S. 

Savage Arms Co. 

Catalogue No. G s Free UtlC«l f N« Y«$ U» S* Am 



I wish to lend my name and influence to 
the protest against the manufacture or use 
of automatic guns. I am surprised to learn 
that patents have been granted for such a 
wicked device. All bird lovers realize how 
murderous are the guns at present in use. 
I would not have believed that wholesale 
murder could be patented. 

Mrs. S. W. Powell, W. Becket, Mass. 



I will not trade with any dealer who sells 
automatic or repeating shot guns. L will 
not associate with any person who uses 
either' of those arms. If every reader of 
Recreation would say the same, and live 
up to it, it would effectually kill the market 
for automatic and repeating shot guns. 

P. A. Henrickson, Racine, Wis. 



The shades of night were falling fast 
As down the cafe aisle there passed 
A girl who bore what looked like rice, 
Yet called she it by this device — 

"Excelsior !" 

" 'Tis not 'Sawdusto,' " she explained, 
"Nor 'Mat in Middlings,' hulled and grained, 
Nor yet 'Near-Fodder,' nor 'Chew-Chew' — 
This breakfast food is something new — 

"Excelsior !" 
— B.oston Post. 



I thank you for the J. C. hand trap. It 
arrived O. K. and it is entirely satisfactory. 
E. H. Lee, Camden, N. J. 



High Grade but not High Priced 

BAKER. GUNS 
Kammer a.nd Ha.mmerless 



Built for He^rd 

Service a^nd to 

last a lifetime 




Send for FREE QUARTERLY and 1905 Booklet Fully 
Describing all Grades with Prices. Mention Recreation. 

Baker Gun & Forging Co., u&a. Batavia, N. Y 



lxx 



RECREATION. 




Where are you going 

NEXT SUMMER? 



No matter where, you will need 
some things to complete your 
camping, fishing or hunting outfit 

Fishing Tackle 
Guns, Ammunition 
Boats, Sleeping Bags 

or something of the kind. 
And this is the time to buy. 

The wise man takes time by the forelock. 
The other man never buys anything until 
he gets ready to use it. Then he is liable 
to have to wait a week, or a month, before 
he can get it. 

Get Our Catalogue "R" NOW 

Make up your orders, send them in and 
we will do the rest. Then, when you get 
ready to go to the woods or to the moun- 
tains you can go, while the other fellows 
stay at home, wait for their outfits and swear. 

Address 

Abercrombic & Fitch Co. 



314 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK 



Mention RFXREATION 



RECREATION. 



lxxi 



Special Bargains in Hammerless Guns 

We offer at these SPECIAL PRICES a small lot of a 

Standard American 
make Breech Load- 
ing Double Guns 




$31.00 grade Gun, fine twist 
$41.00 with Automatic Ejector 
$40.00 Damascus Barrels 



$18.50 
$25.00 
$22.50 




Entirely new. Made on Interchangeable 
System. Top Lever Action. Greener 
style Cross Bolt-Pistol stock. 26, 28 and 
30 inch. 12 and 16 bores, at the followir 
Exceptional Prices : 



Send $5 with order, and if the Gun. is not satisfactory upon receipt it may be returned and money refunded less 
cost of expressage. Or if the whole amount of money is sent with order a Victoria Canvas Case is included. 

Always in stock a full line of high-grade GUNS 

W. & C SCOTT, JOS, LANG & SON, London 

and others, in addition to Parker, Remington and all the American makes. 



JUST NOW ON HAND 

Also large'lot "Hammer Double Guns," 

ten and twelve bores, many of them second- 
hand, taken in trade. Prices 

$8 to $15 



Also lot of Lee Straight Pull Magazine 

Rifles, small bore, made by the Winchester 
Arms Company and cost over $25 each, long 
range and very accurate, in nice refinished brown, 
condition same as new. Suitable ^*-j rr\ 
for target or hunting. Price, each Cp/»J>U 



Servd Six Cents in stamps for Catalogue of New, also of Second-hand Guns 

WM. READ & SONS, 10T Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



Patent No. 764804 has -been issued to 
Frank H. Frissell, of Middletown, Conn., 
on a cartridge belt. 

Patent No. 764803 has been issued to 
W. C. Fisher, Middletown, Conn., on an- 
other form of cartridge belt. This latter 
is a novelty, in that the cartridges are 
placed in groups of 10 each and enclosed 
in pockets attached to the belt. 

Patent No. 765554 has been- issued to 
William Carter, of Louisville, Ky., on a 
fishing reel. 

.Copies of these patents can be had by 
addressing the Patent Office, Washington, 
D. C. 



Patent No. 753,384 has been issued to 
Perry Frazier, of Dubois, Nebr., on a 
breech loading rifle. 

Patent No. 753,425 has been issued to 
to S. D. Noel, of Indianapolis, Ind., on a 
metal boat. 

Patent No. 750,143 has been issued to 
T. B. Wilson, Epes, Ala., on a new device 
for a minnow pail. 

Patent No. 750,054 has been issued to 
R. L. Hunter, Minneapolis, Minn., on a 
fishing reel. 



IN ANSWERING ADS PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 



You Burn Too Much Money 

THE GUN IS A BURNING QUESTION 
$1,000,000 or less burned 
each year in buying 
Cheap Guns. 




^ Tiie Burning Question is QUALITY 

The quality of the PARKER 
GUN is beyond question. In your 
choice it is the part of wisdom to 
see that you are buying a safe gun. 
Our opinions are worth dollars 
to you. We are the oldest manu- 
facturers in America and 
offer you our services F^ee. 

If you expect to own 11 fjiiii in H)0.">, 
riii* us lo-dnv. Mention Rkcukation 



>fe 



Parker Bros. 



33 Cherry St. 

Meriden, Conn. 



Ixxii 



RECREATION. 





H.<& R.Double Action 
Model 1904 
38 Caliber 
also 32 Caliber 
6 Shot. 



A solid frame revolver following the pleasing lines of our famous 
H. & R. Automatic, and which we are supplying in place of the American 
Double Action, as made by us for more than twenty years. 

SPECIFICATIONS 

32 caliber; 6 shot; zYz inch barrel; weight 16 oz.; C. F. S. & W. cartridge; also 
S. & W. Long and Colt New Police Cartridges. 

38 caliber; 5 shot; 2*/^ inch barrel; weight 15 oz.; C. F. S. & W. cartridge. 

FINISH — Nickel. We can furnish with 4^ and 6 inch barrels and in blue finish 
at additional cost. 



s^Mi!/ 



Harrington ®. Richardson Arms Co. 

Makers of H. 6i R. Single Gvirvs 
Catalog for postal. Dept. R. Worcester, M©lSS. 




John A. Hobbes and James F. Smith, of 
Utica, E. J. Smith, Edward Nevin, William 
F. Smith and E. J. Smith, Jr., of Lowville, 
while hunting near Beaver river, October 
16th, found a man unconscious . in some 
brush beside the trail. When revived he 
said he was Charles Castlon, of Boston. 
He had been wandering in the woods 2 or 
3 days trying to find the way back to his 
camp. 

A. E. S., Johnstown, N. Y. 



Mortimer— I've saved a great deal this 
month by not smoking. 

Margaret — Where is it now? 

Mortimer — I don't know; it's just saved. 
— Chicago News. 



I received the Blauvelt knit hunting coat: 
sent as premium and it more than meets 
my expectations. Recreation is A No. 1. 
J. E. Ferris, Ellenburg Depot, N. Y. 



The Mitchell hand trap reached 
promptly and works perfectly. 

Thos. N. Ryan, Lilly, Pa 



me 



The Bristol steel rod and Y. & E. auto- 
matic reel you sent me for premiums were 
received in good condition. They are first 
class in every respect. I am much pleased 
with them. Accept many thanks. 

E. A. Vernal, Leadville, Colo. 



High CradeTrap and Feather- 
weight Field Guns 

The only American makers putting on single trigger 
teed to work perfect under all conditions. 




D. M. Lefeve 

Not connected with 
Lefever Arms Company, 



PRICE 
$60 TO 

$400 

Send for 

1904 
Catalogue 

Mention 
RECREATION 



RECREATION. 



lxxiii 



i0O SWOKEL^ 



Sfl 




A New Shell 

The Indian 



For Sportsmen who still prefer the Black 

Powder Load. These are loaded 
with the best grade of Black Powder 



The Robin Hood Smokeless 

POWDER 

in the Robin Hood Short Brass and the 
Comet Long Brass still sets the pace for 

Pattern, Penetration & Light Recoil 

" Keep watch of our page " 

The Robin Hood Powder Co. 

SWANTON, VT. 



Mention Recreation. 






1XX1V 



■ I 



TO 

AMATEUR 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 



Here is a Chance 
to Get a 

FINE CAMERA EASILY 



A Petite Century, No. 2, 4x5, listed at $15, for 15 new 
yearly subscriptions to Recreation. 

A Century Camera, model 42, 4x5, listed at $24, for 
24 new yearly subscriptions to Recreation. 

These are both neat, compact, well-made and handsomely 
finished cameras, capable of doing high-class work. 



Sample copies for use in canvassing 
furnished on request. 



Address RECREATION 

23 West 24th St, New York, 



RECREATION. 



lxxv 




Model C 16—20 Horse-power. $1800 

Model B... 24—30 Horse-power. $2500 

Model B, Limousine 24—30 Horse-power. .$3500 

Model A.. 40—50 Horse-power. $3500 

Model A, Limousine 40—50 Horse-power. .$4500 



The Accessible WINTON of 1905. 



SEE the new Vertical, Four-Cylin- 
der Motor, — with its hat off. 
Every working part may thus be 
promptly uncovered, except the 
Transmission Gear. 

That's just beneath the foot board, 
forward of front seat. 

You raise that board, turn a handle, 
and lift off top section of the Aluminum 
Gear Case. 

Thus you have it all under your eye, 
in five seconds. 

Now, — you may take out this whole 
Transmission Gear of the 1905 Winton 
from above, without removing the seat, or 
getting under the car. 

Convenient, isn't it ? 

Note the new Twin-Springs. These 
adjust instantly to light, or heavy, loads. 

They make easy-riding, on very rough 
roads. They take the hard work off the 
Tires. They protect the Motor from vibra- 
tion, ( and jolts in going over Car Tracks, 
and "Thank-ye-mums." 

Then, there's the Winton absolute 
Speed-Control. It works by Air-pressure, 
from the Motor. 

Your foot, on the pedal, releases the 
ai r-pressure gradually. That pedal alone 



thus gives you a speed of from 4 miles an 
hour, up to 40 miles an hour, just accord- 
ing to how much you press it. 

The new Steering Gear on the 1905 
Winton can't wear in any one place more 
than in another. 

It thus makes ''lost motion" and 
"wedging" on short turns impossible, 
as a result of uneven wear. 

In this the Winton Steering Gear differs 
from all others now in use. 

The Four Vertical Cylinders of the 
new Winton Motor are fed by one single 
Carburetor, and sparked by one single 
Magneto. 

No Multiple Vibrator,— no Dry Bat- 
tery, and no Storage Battery, (Accumu- 
lator) needed. 

No Springs, Valves, nor Air-pressure 
on the Oil feed, which is Gear driven, 
and cannot siphon, nor flood the Motor, 
The New Model "1905 Winton" Car is grace- 
ful as a Greyhound, but as strong as steel can 
make it. 

Model C, shown above, has as much power 
as the $2500 Winton of last year, but has 800 lbs. 
less weight to carry. 

Get the new Winton book on "How to 
Choose an Automobile." 

Address The Winton Motor Carriage Co., 
Dept. J, Cleveland, Ohio. 



lxxvi 



RECREATION. 




ust To Prove 



I ask no deposit — no promise. There is nothing to 
pay, either now or later. The dollar bottle is free. 



I want no reference — no security. The 
poor have the same opportunity as the rich. 
The very sick, the slightly ill, invalids of years, 
and men and women whose only trouble is 
an occasional "dull day"— to one and all I 
say "Merely write and ask." I will send 
you an order on your druggist. He will 
give you, free, the full dollar package. 

My offer is as broad as humanity itself. 
For sickness knows no distinction in its 
ravages. And the restless patient on a 
downy couch is no more welcome than the 
wasting sufferer who frets through the lag- 
ging hours in a dismal hovel. 

I want EVERYone, EVERY where to test 
my remedy. 

There is no mystery — no miracle. I can 
explain my treatment to you as easily as I 
can tell you why cold freezes water and 
why heat melts ice. Nor do I claim a dis- 
covery. For every detail of my treatment 
is based on truths so fundamental that none 
can deny them. And every ingredient of 
my medicine is as old as the hills it grows 
on. I simply applied the truths and com- 
bined the ingredients into a remedy that is 
practically certain. The paragraphs below 
will show you the reason why. 

In eighty thousand communities — in more 



than a million homes — Dr. Shoop's Restor- 
ative is known. There are those all around 
you — your friends and neighbors, perhaps — 
whose suffering it has relieved. There is not 
a physician anywhere who dares tell you I 
am wrong in the new medical principles 
which I apply. And for six solid years my 
remedy has stood the severest test a medi- 
cine was ever put to— I have said "If it fails 
it is free" — and it has never failed where 
there was a possible chance for it to succeed. 

But this mountain of evidence is of no avail 
to those who shut iheir eyes and doze away 
in doubt. For doubt is harder to overcome 
than disease. I cannot cure those who lack 
the faith to try. 

So now I have made this offer. I disre- 
gard the evidence. I lay aside the fact that 
mine is the largest medical practice in the 
world, and come to you as a stranger. I 
ask you to believe not one word that I say 
till you have proven it for yourself. I offer 
to give you outright a full dollar's worth of 
Dr. Shoop's Restorative. No one else has 
ever tried so hard to remove every possible 
excuse for doubt. It is the utmost my un- 
bounded confidence can suggest. It is open 
and frank and fair. It is the supreme test 
of my limitless belief. 



Inside Nerves ! 

one out of every 98 has perfect 
health. Of the 97 sick ones, some are 
bed-ridden, some are half sick, and some 
are only dull and listless. But most of 
the sickness comes from a common 
cause. The nerves are weak. Not the 
nerves you ordinarily think about — not the 
nerves that govern your movements and 
your thoughts. 

But the nerves that, unguided and un- 
known, night and day, keep your heart 
in motion — control your digestive appar- 
atus — regulate your liver — operate your 
kidneys. 

These are the nerves that wear out and 
break down. 

It does no good to treat the ailing or- 
gan — the irregular heart — the disordered 
liver — the rebellious stomach — the de- 
ranged kidneys. They are not to blame. 
But go back to the nerves that control 
them. There you will find the seat of the 
trouble. 

There is'nothing new about this— noth- 
ing any physician would dispute. But 
it remained for DV Snoop to apply this 
knowledge — to put it to practical use. 
Dr. Shoop's Restorative is the result of 
a quarter century of endeavor along this 
very line. It does not dose the organ or 
deaden the pain — but it does go at once to 
the nerve — the inside nerve — the power 
nerve — and builds it up and strengthens 
it and makes it well. 



Many Ailments, One Cause 

I have called these the inside nerves for 
simplicity's sake. Theirusual name is the 
"Sympathetic" nerves. Physicians call 
them by this name because each is in close 
sympathy with the others. The result is 
that when one branch is allowed to become 
impaired, the others weaken. That is why 
one kind of sickness leads to another. 
That is why cases become "complicated." 
For this delicate nerve is the most sensitive 
part of the human system. 

Does this not explain to you some of the 
uncertainties of medicine — is it not a good 
reason to your mind why other kinds of 
treatment may have failed ? 

Don't you see that THIS is NEW in 
medicine? That this is NOT the mere 
patchwork of a stimulant — the mere sooth- 
ing of a narcotic? Don't you see that it 
goes right to the root of the trouble and 
eradicates the cause? 

But I do not ask you to take a single 
statement of mine — I do not ask you to be- 
lieve a word I say until you have tried my 
medicine in your own home at my expense 
absolutely. Could I offer you a full dollar's 
worth free if there were any misrepresenta- 
tion? Could I let you go to your druggist 
— whom you know — and pick out any bottle 
he has on his shelves of my medicine were 
it not UNIFORMLY helpful? Could I 
AFFORD to do this if I were not reason- 
ably SURE that my medicine will help you? 



Simply Write Me 

The first free bottle may be enough t o 
effect a cure — but I do not promise that. 
Nor do I fear a loss of possible profit if 
it does. For such a test will surely con- 
vince the cured one beyond doubt, or dis- 
belief, that every word I say is true. 

This offer is open to everyone, every 
where. But you must write ME for the 
free dollar bottle order. All druggist 
do not grant the test. I will then direc 
you to one that does. He will pass i 
down to you from his stock as freely as 
though your dollar lay before him. Write 
for the order to-day. The offer may n ot 
remain open. I will send you the book 
you ask for beside. It is free. It will 
help you to understand your case. What 
more can I do to convince you of my in- 
terest — of my sincerity? 



For a free or- 
der lor a full 
dollar bottle 
address Dr. 
Shoop, Box 
^214, Racine, 
Wis. State 

which book you 
want. 



Mild cases are often cured with one or 
two bottles. For sale at forty thousand 
drug stores. 



Book 1 


on 


Dyspepsia. 


Book 2 


on 


the Heart. 


Book 3 


on 


the Kidneys. 


Book 4 


for 


Women. 


Book 5 


for 


.Men. 


Book 6 


on 


Rheumatism. 



Dr. Shoop's Restorative 



WHAT GAME PROTECTION 
HAS COST ONE MAN. 



An Appeal to Sportsmen. 



By Q. 0. Shields. 



WHAT GAME PROTECTION HAS COST ONE MAN. 



G. O. Shields. 



Judge Holt, of the United States Dis- 
trict Court, has appointed Walter C. 
Low of 346 Broadway, receiver in bank- 
ruptcy, for the assets of G. O. Shields, 
publisher of "Recreation," at 23 West 
Twenty -fourth street. — Ncu. York Times, 
January 5th, 1905. * 

This crisis is not due to any im- 
proper management of my business, 
nor to any lack of attention, nor to 
any extravagance in my private or 
business affairs. It is purely the re- 
sult of my work in the interest of 
game protection. 

Ever since the League of Ameri- 
can Sportsman was organized I have 
been going into my own pocket to 
meet the demands of. that organiza- 
tion for money to carry on its work. 
I have repeatedly appealed to the 
sportsmen and nature lovers for 
financial aid in this work, and have 
received some help in that way, but 
not 10 per cent, of the amount that 
was necessary to meet the demands. 

Some one had to supply the defici- 
ency or the work must stop, and so 
] have constantly drawn on my own 
resources. I have believed the friends 
of game protection would eventually 
rally to the support of the cause, but 
comparatively few of them have done 
so. 

True, the League has a large mem- 
bership, but the fee is only $1 a year, 



and 60 per cent, of that must go back 
to the States whence the memberships 
originate. The other 40 per cent, is 
not sufficient to pay postage on the 
printed matter it is necessary to send 
out each month. ;. Then there are 
heavy printing bills, stenographers' 
salaries, rewards for the conviction of 
law breakers, traveling expenses, law- 
yers' fees, etc., all of which I have 
been paying. 

I have records showing personal 
payments of more than $15,000 on 
these accounts. 

Yet in the face of all this I am 
forced into bankruptcy and am locked 
out of my office. And this is only a 
part of what game protection has 
cost me. 

As stated in December Recreation, 
this magazine has never paid expenses 
throughout a year. 1 have done 
everything possible to build up the ad- 
vertising end of the business and to 
extend the circulation sufficiently 
to put the property on a paying 
basis. I have lived as economically 
as a man could live and retain his self 
respect, I have denied myself every 
luxury and many of the necessities of 
life. 

For instance : No man loves music 
more than I do ; yet I have not heard 
an opera in all these years. Neither 
have I heard a high class concert ex- 
cept when invited by some friend. 



1 have made but 2 hunting trips 
since Recreation was established, 
and those only when the doctor told 
me I must choose between the woods 
and the hospital. 

Within the past few years I have 
had 2 opportunities to sell this maga- 
zine for $100,000 cash; and 3 times 1 
have been offered $50,000 for a con- 
trolling interest in it. In each instance 
my answer has been, substantially, , 

"I am not ready to sell Recrea- 
tion. I have not yet accomplished 
the work I set out to do. Before part- 
ing with Recreation I mean to com- 
plete the work of securing good game 
laws in all the States. 

"L mean to educate the sportsmen 
of this country to quit when they get 
enough. 

"I want to build the membership of 
the L. A. S. to 100,000. 

"If I can accomplish these things 
then I shall be ready to sell Recrea- 
tion to some good friend for a few 
thousand dollars, barely enough to 
enable me to live in a cabin in the 
woods the remainder of my days." 

Certain schemers have been hover- 
ing about my* printer for years past, 
trying to buy his claim against me, 
to thus get control of Recreation 
and force me out oi it. He has 
finally assigned a part of his claim to 
the man who has now petitioned to 
have me adjudicated a bankrupt. I 
have paid this same printer $225,000 
in the years he has been printing 
Recreation, but that counts for noth- 
ing now that I owe him a small frac- 
tion of that amount. 

Since I was turned out of my office 
a number of men have had access to it, 
for one purpose or another, and it is 
possible that in the course of this com- 
ing and going a copy of my mailing 
list may have been carried away. This 
may have fallen into the hands of 



some other publication, and if is .pos- 
sible, an offer may be made to my sub- 
scribers to, fill out their subscriptions 
with some other periodical in this line. 

The Real Recreation will, how- 
ever, be continued under my editorial 
management and my , name will/ ap- 
pear, on the cover as heretofore. 

H I now appeal to, .all readers of 
Recreation, to all true sportsmen, to 
all nature lovers and, in short, to all 
who approve my work in the past, to 
raljy to my support in this emergency. 

A few friends are financing The 
Real Recreation temporarily, and it 
is up to the sportsmen of this country 
to provide the funds for carrying it 
on permanently, if they wish it to 
stay in the fight. 

Few other men have worked for 
game protection as I have, and few 
ever will work so hard. No one else 
has put so much money into the cause, 
though thousands of League mem- 
bers have many times the amount at 
their command. Not 'only have I 
bankrupted myself, but I have put my 
heart's blood into the cause. Will you 
fail now, in the day of trial, to stand 
by me and by the cause in which so 
many of you have urged me on with 
your words of approval ? 

My readers will readily understand 
how thoroughly humiliating it is for 
me to have to go before the world 
with such an appeal as this. I have 
put 10 years of the best of my life into 
this work of game protection and I 
am not willing to quit now. The 
work is only half done. The question 
for the sportsmen of America to an- 
swer is, whether I shall be allowed 
to finish my work, or whether I must 
give it up for lack of financial 
support ? 

I have at least 10 years more of 
hard, vigorous work in me. I have 
recently been offered 3 positions in 



other lines, with good salaries, but 
have declined them all. I mean to 
work for the wild animals and the 
birds as long as I work for anything 
or anybody. 1 mean to keep after the 
game butchers until the last one of 
them is reformed or put out of 
business. 

Now, brethren, I want at least 
10,000 of you to send me checks of 
$5 each, for 4 years' subscription to 
The Real Recreation. 

Or, you may pay $10 in advance, 
for 8 years' subscription if you wish. 

Persons who are already subscribers 
may renew or extend their subscrip- 
tions on this basis. 

Now let us have a landslide of $5 
and $10 checks. 

And while you are about it, put in 
another dollar for membership in the 
L. A. S. 

If this appeal is thus met, a fund 
will be created which will put this 
magazine on a sound financial basis 
for all time to come. Meantime, it, in 
connection with the other forces at 
work, will have secured ideal game 
laws everywhere, and it will have 
created a public opinion that will sus- 
tain such laws and that will eventually 
render game wardens unnecessary 
everywhere. 

The only kind of sympathy that 



counts now is that which brings with 
it the sinews of war. 

The responses to this appeal should 
be such as would enable me to put out 
a March number better than any I 
have ever published. Shall it be so? 

I am now compelled to put the price 
of The Real Recreation at $1.50 a 
year, and 15 cents a copy. If I had 
done this years ago, when the cost of 
production increased to such an ex- 
tent as to render an advance in price 
necessary, I should to-day be clear of 
debt; but I chose to keep the price 
down to a figure that would enable 
every man, woman and boy to have 
it. I trust the small advance which 
is^ now rendered inevitable may not 
put this magazine out of the reach 
of any human being. The advance in 
cost is trifling to the individual, but 
on an issue of 65,000 a month the dif- 
ference is great. 

At present I am not allowed to own 
property or to have a bank account. 
Checks should, therefore, be made 
payable to The H. L. Suydam Co., 
and sent to 1269 Broadway, Room 
601. All funds thus received will be 
properly placed and due credit given 
the subscribers. 

Letters addressed to me as above, 
and marked personal, will have 
prompt attention. 



^nS^^C 





surrey: type two. «.«] 

lias been. ,su.bo:r , dina'ted to comjror& and 
re/ScxJbi/y'frpr All or "trie naeclianisna is 
So pimple that trie tov or the ^sunil^* 
can operate it. SnL.im.ple po^z-ei? and 
clea.1ra.1nce xo:r ro-u-gn roaa^ ana nills, po*we3r- 
rixl birakies, arooiny; elegantly- -uLplnol stewed 
Seats, lairge £p*»ing,$, -wlieel^ ana ti:re£,st oarage 
Space "ULnaei* ^eat^, canopy top, water-prooff side 
CiAi-tains and plate- glas>s ^^c^ingingf raront 
4) -Z CJ CJ \J, c omple"t e -\*ritri lamps, t o ols , e t a 
Otrietr models ^So, $ &5o, $1350, $3000 

THOMAS B. JEFFEKY& COMPANY 

J^fccin Office. a^c/!Z^c^oj^^Keno£ria,"Wi,scOTisin 

B:**a:ncne>s, Boston, Cnicago, Pniladelpnia 
Ne^^TorTt Agency; i3-+"West THirty--eiglitti Street. 
R^pre»$ en*taiivc5 in all otnear leaciing cities. 



CHARLES FRANCIS PRESS, NEW YORK. 




Bkuw 



t 



t 



All overthe civslized world 

THE IMPROVED 

BOSTON 




SS KNOWN AND WORN 

Every Pair Warranted 

^X2 The Name Is 
stamped on every 
loop — 




CUSHION 
BUTTON 



Lies flat to the leg— never 
Slips, Tears nor Unfastens 

ALWAYS EASY 



Send 

50c. lor Silk, 
25c. for Cotton, 
Sample Pair. 

REFUSE ALL SUBSTITUTES 



GEO. FROST CO., Makers, 
Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 




BLERS 



COFFEE NIBBLES 

day by day at one's nerves and health. 

When you feel bad, and the condition of 
incipient disease shows forth, you take coffee to 
stimulate and HIDE OR COVER UP the 
trouble. That kind of work brings a fearful 
pay day when the disease has grown so fixed 
that nothing will cover it. 

If you are one of the kind that coffee affects 
adversely— stomach, heart, bowels, eyes or kid- 
neys (it affects some in one organ, some in 
another and with some the entire nervous system), 
suppose you quit in time. It's a lot of fun to be 
entirely well. And it's a surprise to see how 
quickly the old bad feelings leave when the 
coffee has been " let out " for a few days. 

Then there's the daily help of the strong 
rebuilder with its smooth, delicious flavor. 

POSTUM 

There's a reason. 



MENNEN'S 

Borated Talcum 

TOILET POWDER 
for AFTER SHAVING 




Insist that yourbarber uses Mermen's Toilet Powder 

after he shaves you. It is antiseptic, and will PREVENT 
any of the many skin diseases often contracted. A posi- 
tive relief for CHAPPED HANDS, CHAFING, 
and ALL SKIN AFFLICTIONS Removes all odor 
of perspiration. Get Memieil's — the original Sold 
everywhere, or mailed for 25 cents. Sample Fl*6e^ 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., NEWARK, N.J. 



Something. 



Mennen's Violet Talcum S 



methms 
quisite 



EDPINAUDS 

EAU DE QUININE 
HAIR TONIC 

This elegant and refined hair tonic has for 75 years 
been the standard hair preparation in Europe, and 
since its introduction into the United States, 15 years 
ago, it has reached the enormous sale of 150,000 bot- 
tles in one month — in this country alone. 

It removes dandruff, cleanses and gives tone and 
vigor to the scalp, stops the hair from falling out, 
and makes it soft and glossy. 

If your hair is dry, brittle and falling out, if vou 
suffer from dandruff, try this great French Hair 
Tonic, that has stood the test of three-quarters of a 
century, and which is sold ail over the world be- 
cause it do.es what is claimed for it and is absolutely 
harmless. 

Do not confuse this standard preparation with 
the chemical decoctions of mushroom growth, so 
freely offered to the American public as hair tonics. 

CDCC To the Readers 
I" MX EEL of RECREATION 

To demonstrate to those who are not familiar 
with the merits of ED PINAUD'S EAU DE QUI- 
NINE or the exquisite quality of ED PINAUD'S 
PERFUMES AND DENTIFRICE will be sent 
on receipt of jo cents to pay postage and packing 

1 Bottle EAU DE QUININE HAIR TONIC 
1 Bottle ELIXIR DENTIFRICE 
1 Tube PERFUME 

Only one set sent to each person, address 

Ed Pinaud's American Importation Office 

Depl. B. ED PINAID Bldg., N. \'. 






vose 



PIANOS 



have been established over SO YEARS. By our sy» 
tem of payments every family in moderate cirouni 
stances can own a VOSE piano. We take old instru 

merits in exchange and deliver the new piano in your home free of expense 

Write for catalogue D and explanations. 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mass, 



Volume XXII. 
Number 3 



March, 1905 



$1.00 a Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 





Published by WM. E. ANNIS, 23 West 24th Street, New York 



Copyright, 1905, by Win. E. Annis. 



X 




For a Spring Holiday 

no other spot offers such temptations as Jamaica. A climate that is all you expect — 
balmy, salubrious, sunny, but not hot ; scenery that is unique among the world's 
beautiful places; recreations of every variety and hotels that supply every desire. Not 
least, a delightful sea trip of four days, at a most moderate outlay. 

TL« I T^^^^l 17«.ni1- f^^wi-m^niS*. Steel Twin-Screw U.S. Mail Steamships "Admiral 
lhe United t<rUlt Company S Deweyf .. -Admiral Sampson," "Admiral Schley," 
"Admiral Farragut." These steamers sail weekly from Boston and Philadelphia. The new 
American-built Steamships Buckman and Watson weekly from Baltimore. 

Round Trip, $75— Including Meals and Stateroom— One Way, $40 

Weekly sailings from New Orleans to Colon, Republic Panama, Limon, Costa Rica, and ports 
in Central and South America. If you are interested in the trip we will send free "A Happy Month 
in Jamaica," a beautifully illustrated book, also "The Golden Caribbean," our monthly paper. 
Address any of these offices. 

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY 




Long Wharf, Boston. 

Hughes and Henry Sts., Baltimore. 

Raymond & Whitcomb Co. 



5 North Wharves, Philadelphia. 

321 St. Charles St., New Orleans. 

Thos. Cook & Son, Tourist Agents 



. mi»iiiii»i« in i 




RECREATION'S ADVERTISER 



The fisherman who knows the 
game is the man who comes to us. 
We are outfitters to the American 
sportsman. Our goods are selected and 
made for work and have a reputation 
for honest quality the world over. 

Send for our big catalogue "R" 

We have just outfitted Mr. Frederick Palmer, <war correspondent of '" Collier's 
Weekly," complete for his second expedition to the front in the Japanese-Russian ivar. 

Abercombie & Fitch Company, 3 1 4 Broadway, New York City 



Underwood 




Awarded GRAND PRIZE (highest award) at St. Louis Exposition, 1904 

^^ It makes no difference what typewriter you now use, or have 
used, the machine you will eventually buy is the Underwood 

UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER COMPANY, 241 Broadway, New York 



When corresponding with advertisers please mention "Recreation' 



RECREATION ' S ADVERTISER 



WANTS :: FOR SALE :: EXCHANGE 



ADVERTISEMENTS will be inserted under the proper heading in this department at the rate of 
5 cents a word, each initial and figure counting as one word. No advertisement will be inserted at 
less than fifty cents. Cash must invariably accompany the order. A discount of 10 per cent, may 
be deducted from a twelve-time order. It is possible through this department to reach nearly 400,000 peo- 
ple twelve times a year for the sum of $6.00. Display type and illustrations at regular rates. 



SQUABS, PHEASANTS, QUAIL 

CQUAB RAISING PAYS,— Can be tested in city or 
^ country; small space required,- as birds are kept 
wired in; inexpensive, easily adjusted, portable pigeon 
houses sold. Visit our plant; we have the best stock 
and the most perfectly equipped squab-breeding and im- 
porting plant in the world. One hour from Grand Cen- 
tral Station, New York. Write for information and 
prices. 

Royal Squab Aviary, Box 25, Norwalk, Conn. 

DHEASANTS: Thirty-eight varieties are on exhibi- 
1 tion at the farms at the present time. Among them: 
the Argus Pheasant, Common Pea Fowl, the Tragopans, 
Manchurian or Eared Pheasant, Elliot's Pheasant, Eng- 
lish Pheasant, the Green Java Pea Fowl, the Impeyan 
Pheasant, Peacock Pheasant, Reeves's* Pheasant, Lady 
Amherst Pheasant, Golden Pheasant. Jungle Fowl: 
Beautiful and very rare species. Wild Turkeys: Superb 
bronze birds. Crown Pigeons: The largest of their 
race. Quail: California Valley and Oregon Mountain 
Quail. The Davenport Farms, Morris Plains, N. J. 

pHEASANTS, Wild Ducks, Quail, Geese, Prairie 
Chickens, etc. Extra fine lot of Golden, Silver, and 
English Ring Neck Pheasants. Also Wood Ducks and 
Gray Call Ducks. 

Wallace Evans, Game Propagating Farm, 

Oak Park, 111., 

UAIL, Pheasants, Peacocks, Swans, and Squabs— - 
we are the largest importers and breeders in 
America of Pure Belgian Homers; our birds are Mated 
and Tested, and will produce larger Squabs than any 
other breed known. $1.50 per pair; 50 pair, $1.35 per 
pair; 100 pair or over, $1.25 per pair. White Homers, 
$2.25 per pair. Circular free. Quail in any number. 
Illustrated circular. 

Cape Cod Squab Co., Box C, Wellfleet, Mass. 

CQUABS ARE MONEY MAKERS. Our Homers pro- 
_ duce the finest squabs in this country. They require 
little attention. Send for information and prices. 

Homer Squab Company, Lindehurst, L. I. 

"Y^E were the Pioneers in Squabs; our birds and our 
methods have revolutionized the industry. Our 
business is the Largest in the World in the Pigeon or 
Poultry Line. Visitors welcome at our plant at Mel- 
rose, Mass., eight miles north of Boston. Address all 
letters to Boston office. 

Plymouth Rock Squab Company, 

287 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



PHOTOGRAPHY. I . make the best lantern-slides 
and bromide enlargements in America at no addi- 
tional cost. Send in your pet plate or film and let me 
show you how an enlargement brings out the detail 
and beauty of the original. Catalogue free. 

Chas. H. Loeber, Photographic Supplies. 

18 E. 17th Street, New York. 



9 



W ANTED TO BUY a 5x7 Camera with Georz lens. 



Otto Sellers, Granite City, 111. 



KENNEL 



AIREDALE TERRIERS— Three good litters of pup^ 
pies ready for delivery. Also two Brood Bitches. 
Clayton Kennels, Brookline, Mass. 



"gLOODHOUNDS, Foxhounds, Norwegian Bearhounds, 
Irish Wolfhounds, Registered. Four-cent stamp 
for catalogue. 

Rookwood Kennels, Lexington, Ky. 



BOOK ON DOG DISEASES and How to Feed mailed 
free to any address by the author. 

H. Clay Glover, D.V.S., 1278 Broadway, N. Y. 



QOLLIES — Puppies and Grown Stock For Sale. 

Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 



p°R SALE — Coon, Fox and Rabbit Hounds that have 
had the experience and know their business. 



Comrade Kennels,. Bucyrus, O. 



pREE CATALOGUE of America's Largest Pointer 
Kennel. 

Bar Harbor Kennels,. Bar Harbor, Maine. 



fJORDON SETTERS FOR SALE— Major A Magnet 
A and Mack A, whelped March 30, 1904, by Peter 
A, No. 71648, ex Bessie A, 69234'. Junior A, Jane A 
a -J y A ' whel P ed J une 2 S, 1904, by Champion Teddy 
A, No. 60875, ex Bessie A, No. 72132. Address 

B. W. Andrews, Woodbury, N. J. 
or 204 River Front Stores, Philadelphia, Pa. 



POINTERS, SETTERS AND HOUNDS. Can supply 
you with anything from a pup to a broken dog at 
a fair price. 

Geo. W. Lovell, Middleboro, Mass. 



pRESTO KENNELS— The home of famous Boston 
terriers. Young, housebroken and sporty Boston 
Terriers generally on hand. Send stamp for booklet. 
Address 

James A. Davis, 92 State Street, Boston, Mass. 
Successor to J. Varnum Mott, M.D. 



pRENCH POODLES— Winners of over 400 . prizes. 
Prize-winning young stock and puppies for sale, 
tor full particulars apply to 

Red Brook Kennels, Great Neck, L. I. 
Visitors by appointment. Tel. 26 W. Gt. Neck. 



SMOOTH FOX TERRIERS— Young Stock For sale, 
The Sabine Kennels, Orange, Tex. 



KENNEL SUPPLIES 



J{ FOOD FOR PUPPIES. Champion Dog Biscuit is 
an excellent food for puppies because it is made of 
carefully blended flours and meat cracklings — just the 
things the little dogs need to keep them in good health. 
Send for free sample. 

St. Paul Bread Co., 558 View St., St. Paul, Minn. 



When corresponding with advertisers please mention "Recreation' 



ECREATION'S ADVERTISER 



CANOES AND BOATS 



"GUILDERS of Fine Pleasure and Hunting Boats, 
*~* Canoes, Gasoline Launches, Small Sail Boats. Send 
for catalogue. 

Dan Kidney & Son, West De Pere, Wis. 

A/f ORRIS CANVAS CANOES— -Unequaled in Strength. 
1 Beautiful in Finish. Send for circular of special 

Indian model. B. N. Morris, Veazie, Me. 



SPORTSMEN'S ACCESSORIES 

THE KINSTLER WAR BAG for Sportsmen, Campers, 
etc. Holds as much as a trunk. Weight, 3^2 
pounds. A valise on the cars. A pack-bag in the woods. 
Send for circular R. 

J. Kinstler, 126 Oak Street, Chicago, 111. 



SPORTSMEN'S RESORTS 



TEE MONTICELLO, Norfolk, Va. The Finest Hotel 
in the South. In going South and coming from 
the South, it's the place to stop. Canvasbacks served 
and canvasback hunters catered to. 



UICKORY INN. Situated in one of the best hunting 
sections of the country. Strictly up-to-date — - 

shooting unsurpassed. Birds never so plentiful as now. 
Guides and dogs furnished. 

J. E. Montague, Hickory, N. C. 



POSITIONS WANTED 

yUANTED — Position on sheep or cattle ranch by a 
young man who has served a long term in the army, 
in the Philippines and China. 

G. C. Shumaker, U. S. Arsenal, Pittsburg, Pa. 



RUBBER STAMPS AND STENCILS 



■f)0 YOU USE RUBBER STAMPS? If so, let us 
*~^ correspond with you and send you samples of our 
work. We make the best rubber stamps and stencils 
in New York. We are also agents for the Protecto- 
graph, the best safety check protector on the market. 
Send postal card for circular. 

Abram Aaron s, 22 E. 8th Street, New York, N. Y. 



POULTRY 



WHITE LEGHORN EGGS FOR SETTING. Fourteen 
acres of poultry. Utility and standard qualities our 
aim. Write for terms. 

The Maplewood Poultry Farm, 

P. O. Box 121. Milburn, N. J. 

QRIGINATORS OF ALL ORPINGTON FOWLS. 
w William Cook & Sons. Scotch Plains, N. J., Box 30. 
Also of England and South Africa. 



CURIOS 



$5 



pj r Paid for rare 1853 Quarters; $4 paid for 1804 
• / . » Dimes; $15 paid for 1858 Dollars; big prices 
paid for hundreds of other dates; keep all money coined 
before 1879 and send ten cents at once for a set of 
two coin and stamp value .books. It may mean a fortune 
to you. Address 

C. F. Clarke, Agent, Le Roy, N. Y., Dept. 3. 

TV/TARINE SHELLS AND CURIOS— My illustrated 
catalogue and a showy shell mailed for 10 cents. 
Collection of choice shells from 25 cents to $1. Send for 
lists. J. H. Holmes, Dunedin, Fla. 



TAXIDERMISTS 



^TAXIDERMIST. A specialty in mounting Moose, 
Elk, Caribou and Deer Heads. Call and examine 
work. Rowland, 182 Sixth Avenue, New York. 

CAVE YOUR TROPHIES. Write for our illustrated 
catalogue "Heads and Horns." It gives directions 
for preparing and preserving Skins, Antlers, etc. 
Ward's Natural Science Establishment, 

.Rochester, N. Y. 

"\A7ANTED to mount your game heads, fish, birds, 
and fur rugs; first-class work guaranteed. 

John Peters, Taxidermist, Chicago, 111. 

A NIMALS, Birds, Game Fish, Heads of Deer, Ante- 
lope, Elk, Moose, Buffalo, etc., mounted true to 
nature. Animal skins tanned and lined for rugs. First- 
oiass work guaranteed. Write us for estimates. 

W. C. Kaempfer, Taxidermist, 
259 to 265 Elm Street, Chicago, 111. 



The Malcolm Rifle Telescopic Sight 

IS ACKNOWLEDGED TO BE THE BEST PLACED ON THE MARKET 





We are Originators not Imitators. All of our Outfits are first class 
Any advice regarding the best power and length Tube for Hunting or Target 
purposes givt-n when requested. SEND FOR OUR LA TEST CA TALOGUE. 

THE MALCOLM RIFLE TELESCOPE MFG. CO. 



Established 1857 



F. T. CORNISH, Mgr. 



SYRACUSE, N. Y., U. S. A. 



When corresponding with advertisers please mention "Recreation" 



RECREATION'S ADVERTISER 




To Our Friends, The 
Circulation Builders 

HE CHANGE in the management 
of Recreation necessitates an entire 
change in the work of our Circula- 
tion Department. We will continue to give 
premiums to all who obtain subscribers for us 
and the premiums will be handsomer and 
more numerous than ever. 

We intend to give our old and new friends 
in the work an opportunity to select from an 
exhaustive list, the prize they wish to earn. 

This list, in the shape of an illustrated 
catalog, is now being prepared. 

We will not take up the pages of the 
magazine with descriptions of these many new 
and valuable premiums, so it will be neces- 
sary for you to send in your name at once for 
a copy of the catalog. 

We will have a new and original method 
of handling this department of our business, 
which will make it easier for you to obtain 



When corresponding with advertisers please mention " Recreation' 



RECREATION'S ADVERTISER 



subscribers and render the v/ork more pleasant 
than it has ever been. 

If you have never tried to earn a premi- 
um, now is a good time to start, for Recrea- 
tion is going to be better, bigger and more 
valuable with each succeeding number. 

The fishing season is almost here and with 
a few hours devoted to subscription work for 
a week, you can get a new rod, a reel, a fly book, 
a creel, a camera or practically any one of the 
things that make the Sportsman's heart glad. 
There will be premiums for the dear ladies, 
too, and for the boys we have treasures in store. 

While we are preparing the catalog, it 
might be well for you to suggest to us what 
you wish in the way of a premium. While 
our list will be complete, yet there is always 
some one thing lacking, and this one thing 
may be the thing you have been wanting for 
months. We will get it for you. 

Do not wait for the catalog to arrive 
before starting in for the Spring work. Send 
in your subscribers now and we will credit 
your account with the names, so that by the 
time the catalog reaches you, all you will 
have to do is to select your premium. 

RECREATION. 



When corresponding with advertisers please mention "Recreation' 



RECREATION'S ADVERTISER 



"Raffles" 



Gentleman 
Burglar 



The activity of 
the Scotland Yard 
detectives forces 
"Raffles," gentle- 
man burglar, to 
temporary re ti re-; s 
ment— "3 rest cure," 
he calls it. 

He breaks into 
the h ous e of the 
Inspector of Prisons, who , 
is traveling on the Continent. r 

Here "Raffles" makes his home. _ 

The Inspector returns unexpectedly and upsets the Cracksman's 
plans. He overcomes, gags, and binds the unlucky official, and 
leaves him to take "a rest cure" of a rather indefinite length. 

;" The Rest Cure," the third " Raffles" tale, appears in 



Now ( 
sale 



Colliers 



Ten cents 
the copy 



MARCH HOUSEHOLD NUMBER 



When corresponding with advertisers please mention "Recreation" 



Vol. XXII 



Number 3 



RECREATION 

A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 

Dan Beard, Editor 



ONE DOLLAR A YEAR 



TEN CENTS A COPY 



CONTENTS FOR MARCH, 1905 



Our New Editor, Dan Beard 

Publishers' Announcement 

Roping Wild Hogs in Texas 

The Call of Spring. A series of eight 

The Camp Fire 

Striped Bass in the Susquehanna 

The Tragedy of Tiger 

Solid Comfort in Old Washington 

An Antelope's Battle for Her Fawn 

After Duck on Pamlico Sound 

Where Joy Returns 

Kindly Reminiscence 

Drawing by Roy Martell Mason 

Raindrops 

A Midsummer Misadventure 
Walks Afield :. . . 

The Cruise of the " Hobo " 

With photographs by the writer 

Pure and Impure Foods 

Death of Bud Moose— His Story 

An Animated Sandhill and an Albino Deer 

W. H. Stevens 200 

Little Dwellers Behind the Fence 202 

The Birds of the City. Illustrated. C.M.Story 203 

The American Merganser 205 

With drawing by Allan Brooks 

A Saddle Song .... H. P. Dickinson 206 

Automobile Notes Edited by Willard Nixon 207 

Illustrated 

Sun Gunshots for the Sportsman-Photographer . 21 1 

Illustrated 

And you wonder why your dog has rheumatism 2 1 7 



photograph 



A. McCampbell 

W.C.Ludlow 
Hobart Clarkson 
William J. Lampton 
Stanley H. Hopper 
Howard Eaton 
Alexander Hunter 



Frontispiece 
145 
147 
149 
158 
159 
164 
166 
167 
169 



Irene Pomeroy Shields 174 



Dudley Rushon 



175 



• . Agnes L. Hughes 1 76 

. Mrs. Jos. S. Gibbs 177 

. , Chas. Francis Saunders 184 

. . E. C. Hamilton 187 

. C. F. Langworthy, Ph.D. 195 

. H. B. Brown 196 

The Thief who came in the Night . . S.I. 219 

Witb drawing by W. H, Shindler 
A Novel Trip Down the Mountains 

Celestine Cummings 219 

Can the Eye Follow a Bullet's Flight ? . . . 200 

The Comedians of the Woods 221 

Drawing by Ernest Thompson-Seton 

An Uncomfortable Situation 222 

Drawing by Roy Martell Mason 

Letters from Our Readers 223 

The Amateur Trappers. . Charley Apopka 230 

Editorial Wanderings . . . Dan Beard 234 



The contents of this magazine are copyrighted and must not be reprinted without permission. 

Published by WM. E. ANNIS, 23 West Twenty-fourth Street, New York 



Entered at the New York Post-office as Second Class Mattel 



RECREATION'S ADVERTISER 




Vinol— the cod liver preparation without oil— 

is superseding old-fashioned cod liver oil and emulsions 

Because, without a drop of oil or disagreeable feature, Vinol contains all the medicinal elements 
of cod liver oil, actually taken from fresh cods' livers. By our process the oil, having no 
value either as a medicine or food, is separated from the medicinal elements and thrown away. 
Unlike old-fashioned cod liver oil and emulsions, Vinol is deliciously palatable, agreeable to the 
weakest stomach, and therefore unequalled as a body builder and strength creator for old people, 
puny children, weak, run-down men and women, after sickness, and for all pulmonary diseases. 

Sold at the leading drug store in every city and town and in the big cities, viz : 

NEW YORK: Riker's Drug Stores. Sixth Ave. and 23 J St.; cor. Broadway and 9th. liegeman & Co. 200 and 205 Broadway; 

200 W. 125th ; 1917 Amsterdam Ave. ; 2835 Third Ave. Kinsman's Drug Stores. 601 Eighth Ave.; 125th St. and Eighth Ave. 

J. Jungmann. 1020 Third Ave. ; 428 Columbus Ave.; 1 East 42d St. Bolton Drug Co. (Brooklyn.) All Stores. 
BOSTON : Jaynes & Co. 50 Washington St. cor. Hanover ; 877 Washington St. cor. Common ; 143 and 129 Summer St. 
PHILADELPHIA . Geo. B. Evans. 1 106 Chestnut ; 17th and Chestnut ; 1012 Market ; 8th and Arch ; 2330 North Front. 
CHICAGO: The Public Drug Co. 150 State St. 

Sent, express paid, on receipt of $1.00 by any Vinol agent, or by 

CHESTER. KENT <& CO., CHEMISTS, BOSTON, MASS 

Exclusive agencies for VINOL are given to one druggist in a place. 



When corresponding with advertisers please mention "Recreation* 




Our New Editor, 
Dan Beard. 



Life number League of American Sportsmen, 
Canadian Camp, Camp Fire Club, author of the 
"American Boy's Handy Book" and other books; 
five years a member of the Board of Education. 



RECREATION 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 

Published by Wm. E. Annis 
Vol. XXII MARCH 1905 No. 3 



PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT 

Mr. G. O. Shields is no longer connected with Recreation. 

In the future the magazine will be issued under the editorship of Dan Beard. 

We shall continue to wage an uncompromising fight for the protection and 
conservation of all game. 

We shall advocate such legal action as will place the bag or catch limit upon 
a sane basis all over the country. 

We shall assist in the formation and passage of laws prohibiting the t OUR 
shipment or transportation of game, except in limited quantities, and then FUTURE 
only when accompanied by the party or parties who killed it. POLICY 

We shall advocate the prohibition of the sale of gam\e. 

We shall further assist in every possible way, clubs and associations, in per- 
fecting the existing game laws, in effecting their wise and just administration. 

We shall also ask for the extension of appropriations for the proper and 
economic restocking of wood and stream with game and fish, and to this end 
will use our influence with state and government officials for more forest pre- 
serves, with better plans for the propagating of game and a wider field of use- 
fulness for our National and State commissions. 

We hope to leave the game hog to wallow in his own mire with good officials 
EXIT THE to watch him so that his snout may be kept from appearing in this mag- 
"GAME azine. We think that the valuable space heretofore occupied by him, 
HOG " can be put to better purpose. 

We shall not attempt to say that our way is the only way to protect and preserve the 
interest of the true sportsman, but we shall co-operate with all who have the cause of 
true fish and game protection at heart. 

We cannot hope to reach this practical, common-sense view of the situation 

by reason alone. 

145 



146 RECREATION 

At night the camp-fifes twinkle in ever increasing numbers on the plains, 
in the forest, among the mountains, and each little fire is a star of hope to the 
wise men of the East, for the Magi know that the campers are unconsciously 
learning their first lesson of love and reverence for Nature in the Kindergarten 
of the Wilderness. 

WE BELIEVE THAT "RECREATION" HAS AN ESPECIAL MES- 
SAGE FOR YOUNG, AMERICA, and it is to Young America that America 
must look for her future greatness. 

True it is "the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world," but in connection with 
this queenly control we believe that RECREATION has a continued interest. jq 

Take away from American life the freedom of the great out doors, the play vrHTNir* 
without which all life's lessons are lost, and the era of true commercialism, the »<->UiNU 
dream of the 'business kings will be realized. AflERICA 

In its efforts to present the never failing beauties of the forests, the fields 
and the waters, RECREATION WILL CALL UPON ALL YOUNG 
AMERICA FOR ASSISTANCE. 

The high lights of literature, when they shine true, will find a place in our pages, 
but literature for literature's sake, has little charm for us. We want the truth, told in 
simple English words, understandable to all alike. 

Our new Editor, Dan Beard, is a man of simple habits and studious nature. 

OUR -^ s assl °ciations in life have not led him to the fountains of commercialism. 

_ Ever an enthusiastic admirer of the leaders of the "strenuous life," his own fancy 

NEW ha S led him rather toward to the untrodden paths and unbeaten trails of the 

EDITOR wilderness. He is a man in the prime of life, but with a heart as young and a 

mind as free as a youth turned .loose for the first time in that great world where 

chimney pots and Hue linen are things apart. He knows the East, the West, the North, 

the South. 

With his broad vision we hope to see and solve the many problems con- 
fronting the seeker after light, and to solve them aright. 

Our Editor believes that the modern inventions, the automobile and motor boat, are 
a part and parcel of the great movement toward the open air, so we will give the ownersi 
of these wonderful craft of the roads and waters many a useful hint, and suggest Itoi. 
them many a splendid outing. 

Our old and tried friends, the hunters and fishermen of America, will TO OUR 

continue to hold the choicest seats at our camp-fire and the warmest place OLD 

in our hearts. FRIEND5 

In the search for truth and light the old teachers will be given due accord^ but it is 
rather to the young and unknown writer, artist and photographer that we shall looki 
for the life of the magazine. We like to see the axe marks on the stories and pictures that 
are sent to us by members of our family, and we believe that our readers do too. 

In future years, when pipes are lit, and the camp-fire spreads its glow, we 
hope to look back upon this preliminary announcement and say to ourselves 
and to all of the members of our great family, "the trail was long, and the pack - 
heavy, but at the end of the journey there were crystal springs bubbling with 
life for the tired and yearworn traveler." 

You, gentle reader, can help us in this campaign of ours in many ways, and 
we hope that you are already one of the family. If not, accept this cordial in- 
vitation to join us. YOU WILL NOT REGRET THE STEP. 

Wm. E. Annis, Publisher. 



ROPING WILD HOGS IN TEXAS. 



BY A. McCAMPBELL. 



On a bright sunny morning in 
December Jack, Tom and I saddled 
our horses at a ranch 25 miles 
from Corpus Christi, Texas, and, 
armed with shot guns, started for a 
wate.r tank in the pasture where 
geese collected by thousands. Five 
miles out we came to a small motte, 
or cluster of trees, in the great pas- 
ture. As we entered the motte from 
the North we saw 6 wild hogs leav- 
ing it from the South side, a large 
boar, 4 sows and a shoat. They 
were game hogs, too, but not the 
kind you are so fond of roasting. 

Someone suggested roping these 
wild swine, and, of course, the idea 
took ; so, leaning our guns against a 
tree, we struck off in pursuit of the 
drove. 

Tom being an experienced hog 
hunter, we obeyed his instructions, 
which were to run them down, and 
then rope and tie them. By the way, 
wild hogs captured and fed a short 
time make the best bacon, affording 
the proverbial "streak of lean and 
streak of fat." 

We put spurs to our cayuses and 
kept the hogs bunched, riding hard 
on • their heels. Presently the shoat 
began to lag. Tom threw his rope 
over its head and without stopping 
began to haul away, intending to lay 
it across his pommel, tie its legs se- 
curely, and then drop it to be picked 
up by the wagon the next day ; it 
being the custom at the ranch to send 
out a wagon every year and bring in 
about 20 hogs caught in this way. 

When the hoisting had gone on till 
the pig came within reach of the 
horse the pig grabbed a mouthful 
of neck and held on like a bulldog. 
The bronc was none of the gentlest 
and began a cancan, waltzing, kick- 
ing, rearing, and pitching. Tom 
swore to beat the British army in 



Flanders, and pounded the hog with 
fist and quirt to make it let go. 

The horse's desperate leaps shook 
the hanging hog from one side of his 
neck to the other, and at last he 
dropped to the ground, taking with 
him a mouthful of horse beef. 

Tom had taken the rope from the 
shoat's neck and the prisoner of a 
moment ago was then free to roam 
the plains again. Tom made no ef- 
fort to recover it, consoling himself 
with the remark that "it was too 
small to eat, anyway." 

I, having had no experience, was 
told to rope a hog, then put my horse 
to the gallop till the hog was nearly 
choked to death, when I could easily 
and safely dismount and catch him 
by the legs. They said the horse 
would keep the rope taut till I could 
tie my prisoner. 

I caught a good sized sow, dragged 
her, dismounted, caught her by the 
hind legs, and held her on her back, 
well stretched. She came to in a 
short time and tried to regain her 
feet, but I could manage her easily 
enough until I undertook to tie her. 
Then I had a whole circus on my 
hands. The only rope I had was 
around her neck at one end and fast 
to the saddle at the other. To loosen 
that would be to free the sow. 

In my quandary I looked around to 
see what the other fellows were do- 
ing. Tom had caught a sow, dragged 
her a mile or so, and was in the act of 
taking her by the hind legs. She, also, 
came to, and kicked. She got up and 
went at him with a "woof-woof." 
Tom managed to get beyond the 
length of her rope and was safe, but 
the poor horse fared worse. Turning 
suddenly the sow struck his forelegs 
and stampeded him so that he started 
for the ranch, 8 miles away, on a run. 
His course lay across a bald prairie, 



147 



148 



RECREATION. 



dotted with hog wallows. At the 
first jump the sow was jerked clear 
of the ground, and, I think, over 
3 wallows, before she touched the 
earth again. From that point she 
seemed to hit the top of one and 
bounce over 2. Tom was disgust- 
ed at being left afoot 8 miles from 
home. He ran up to/Jack, who had 
caught the boar and' was holding it, 
150 yards from me. They were both 
destitute of string with which to tie 
the pig and did not dare let go for a 
minute. 

Tom asked Jack to lend him his 
horse with which to catch his own ; 
but Jack preferred to go after the 
horse himself. So he turned the boar 
over to Tom to hold, loosed the rope 
from his saddle, threw it on the 
ground, and lit out. 

Meantime I stood watching Jack 
with one eye and my sow with the 
other. Then I was startled by a yell 
and saw Tom coming toward me at 
top speed with the boar at his heels, 
reaching for him with tusks 4 inches 
long. 

I tried to tell Tom to run in some 
other direction, but he was deaf to all 
admonition and came on like a -stam- 
peded steer. Finally he reached a big 
mesquite bush round which he and 
his friend the enemy played hide and 
seek for a time. 

Presently Tom ran to me and said 
the boar had gone off with his rope. 
He wanted to borrow my horse with 
which to recover it, but I said if he 
would take a kindly interest in caring 



for my sow I. would get his rope. 

He agreed, and, throwing my rope 
on the ground, I mounted my bronc 
and went after the boar, which had 
almost reached a cluster of black 
chapparal. He was following a cow 
trail in which the rope was dragging. 
I made several attempts to pick up 
the trailing rope without dismount- 
ing, but the path in which it dragged 
was too deep and I failed. At last, 
spurring my horse up alongside, I 
caught the rope and was just 
straightening up when the boar, turn- 
ing sideways, hit my horse a lick 
which knocked his forefeet from 
under him. 

I was thrown through the air in a 
beautiful parabola, landing on my 
back in the chapparal, whose thorns 
were so thick that I lay there a foot 
above ground and helpless. Had my 
friend the boar seen fit to hunt me 
then, he would have had a picnic ; but 
much to my relief he didn't. 

When I got out, my horse was still 
standing where he had been over- 
thrown. Concluding I had had 
enough pork, I mounted and went to 
where I had left Tom holding the 
sow. I found him ; not as I expect- 
ed, with his prisoner tied, but stand- 
ing on one side the same old mes- 
quite tree, with the sow on the other, 
glaring at each other. Both looked 
tired. I caught the rope and together 
we tied and left her for the wagon 
to pick up. She was our only cap- 
ture out of the whole bunch. The 
biggest one got away. 




nnnm 








On the Columbia. 
By D. D. Wilder. 







fill 




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Scrappy Still. 
ByA.S. Goss. 










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Steady There! 
By Harry L. Dillaway. 




:r ' 




Sixteen Ounces? 
By Kepler. 



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Hooked. 
By Wm. Gibson. 




The Long Riffie. 
By W. J. Street. 



■HUB 

■Hi 










As the Boats Come In. 
By Wm. S. Rice. 





One More Kick. 
By F. R. Raife. 



i6o 



RECREATION, 



quehanna trailed out after him. The 
writer made the next exit. Thus three 
men went on the trail of their tackle. 

They met at the ticket office. "Two 
tickets to Perryville. Can we catch 
that jerk water train down to Octoraro 
Junction on good connections?" 

"Sure/' mumbled the agent, pound- 
ing the date machine mechanically. 
"Just about time enough to get break- 
fast at Perryville and get the first milk 
train on the Wilmington line." 

The pair wandered out in the great 
arched depot shed while the uninvited 
guest behind them transacted some 
more Perryville transportation busi- 
ness at the ticket window. It was a 
trinity of anglers that snored in the 
Pullman that night and a trinity that 
got off at Perryville at six o'clock on 
the following morning. 

We lit into the breakfast table in 
a body. An angler may disguise his 
intentions only for a short time. The 
freemasonry of the art discloses one's 
innermost thoughts and by the time the 
hot coffee of the obliging farmer's 
wife came unto us it became evident 
that the uninvited guest was welcome 
to "butt in" and reap all the benefits 
that might accrue. 

From Perryville to Octoraro Junc- 
tion is a short trip, half an hour per- 
haps. We arrived before seven and 
swung off like old timers returning 
once again to the scenes of our youth. 

A short, gray, rather pleasant look- 
ing old fellow was leaning against the 
little red depot in a field of milk cans. 
The greeting he offered the best bil- 
liard player in our party was cordial 
indeed. 

"The river's clear all right, all 
right," he shouted, reaching for the 
proffered hand, and then drawing his 
former patron in a closer caucus, sort 
of whispered : "They're takin' the bait 
to beat the band." 

Through the shrubbery of wild 
blackberry vines and oaks I saw 
gleams of the river, swirling here and 
there against a wooded background 



stretching away toward the Chesapeake 
bay. Visions - of a battle royal leapt 
into every vista within the range of my 
eyesight. 

"Shake hands with Mr. Irwin." A 
friendly slap on the back awakened 
me. I turned to feel the outstretched 
palm of the farmer. The florid man 
broke into hilarious laughter at the 
suggestion that we walk over to Ir- 
win's house. "Walk? What's the 
matter with riding ? Great guns, men, 
I didn't come down here to walk." 

We left- him fuming among the milk 
cans and broke through the wild hedge 
on the heels of Irwin. Presently the 
underbrush cleared and we saw across 
the dew spangled field that lay like a 
blanket of green flannel before us, a 
snug cottage tucked away in the trees 
along the river bank. 

The billiard player, no longer able to 
restrain himself, made a rush for it and 
went loping across the field like a 
maverick hunting a salt lick. I fol- 
lowed a close second for the money 
and place. Irwin, with some of the in- 
stincts of the Maryland Boniface, lin- 
gered until the florid one hove in view. 
A billow of profanity came spilling 
across the landscape and splashed up 
on the porch where the former visitor 
and the writer were busy with rods 
and tackle. 

"Slap on a spinner," chirped the 
cheerful one, "any old spinner will do. 
A kidney spoon, a double or single bass 
twirler; even a squid on a swivel. I 
use a pickerel bait as a rule. Throw 
the three line hook out. Isn't worth 
a whoop. Rig a braided or four strand 
loop leadered hook about six inches 
from the spoon. See, like that." He 
made a deft movement and held up the 
killing center of his effort. "Now get 
out a six foot double leader and link it 
firmly to the upper loop of the spoon 
rig. So. No sinkers ; the weight of 
the spoon and swivel will take her 
down. Besides some of the eddies 
snake the layout under water like a 
steel head hitting a brown hackle. 
There you have it. Death and disaster 



STRIPED BASS IN THE SUSQUEHANNA 



161 



to the striped boys. That line of yours 
won't do, Bill. Here's a reel with the 
right stuff all loaded. Two hundred 
yards of it." 

From his kit he dragged forth a 
sturdy multiplier that was keyed up to 
G-flat and sang like De Reszke. It was 
literally forced upon me. I couldn't 
refuse. "That'll hold 'em for a while 
anyhow," he continued while he pieced 
out a ten ounce split bamboo with top 
and bottom line guides. "Sure to get 
a big one to-day, Sport; and there'll 
be a fight sure. Do you know — " he 
dropped the tip of his pole on the 
porch and with a look of mysterious 
intelligence in his eye concluded, "not 
over a dozen men on earth have fished 
for the striped bass in this river since 
they were discovered here. Why even 
the lobsters on the other side of the 
stream don't know what we're doing 
when we get out in the pools. Sure. 
It's virgin water and the best of the 
kind within a hundred miles of New 
York." 

"Then it's to 'be kept a secret," I 
ventured, fixing my borrowed reel in 
the socket. 

"Not in a million years. Can't be 
kept a secret. Be all over the country 
before the season's over. And it ought 
to be. I don't take much stock in the 
lone fisherman. Spread it, old man. 
Spread it." 

At that moment the florid person, 
having exhausted his wrath on Irwin 
and being altogether sore at the pros- 
pect of walking back over the same 
route, came up and sank, puffed out 
and tired on the grass near by . 

"Every fisherman on earth is a d — d 
fool. I want to get down on the rec- 
ord right now as dead against any and 
all kinds of angling that involve walk- 
ing. I can stand trains and buck- 
boards and even flat bed farm wagons, 
but this galloping over plowed fields is 
poor sport." 

Irwin snorted with glee and "the 
man who knew" made some observa- 
tions about "chumps from town." 

Heavy footfalls sounded from with- 



in the Irwin house and presently three 
strapping youths came lumbering out 
of as many doors. Heirs to the old 
man's estate. Guides on the river. 
Boatmen who knew where the striped 
bass lurk in the shadow of the river 
boulders. These were the men to con- 
duct us to the conquest. 

"Well, boys," put in the sire, ex- 
tracting a cud of long cut from a tin 
foil package and tucking it into the 
off side of his face, "git out them boats 
and git in motion. These gentlemen 
want some sport and this is the place 
to git it. How 'bout that bait ? Guess 
it's fresh all right. I got in six hun- 
dred yesterday from New York. Git 
it up." 

After all is said and done so far as 
angling is concerned, bait is a matter 
of no little importance. I hadn't given 
the subject much thought in the pres- 
ent instance. Somehow or other I had 
figured out in a vague sort of way that 
the bait would turn up at the proper 
time. Had I been alone on the banks 
of the Susquehanna far away I might 
have tried every kind of lure but the 
right one and remained Ashless to this 
day. 

And this brings me, gentle angler, to 
the pith and heart of the Susquehanna 
secret. It's the greatest in the world. 
Without it there is no hope of a strike, 
no, not the remotest chance that the 
great black and gold eyed prizes will 
ever so much as sniff the hook. Come 
nearer, angler folk, and the Sphinx 
will speak : 

Use blood worms. The secret is out. 

Get them from the salt, salt sea. 
Keep them alive in the fresh kelp that 
comes and goes with the tide. Never 
go to the Susquehanna with less than 
200. Strip from six to ten on your 
hook; leaving a few squirming tails 
waving off the main line. Bunch 'em 
up and with a prayer for good luck 
cast your tackle overboard and put 
yourself in the hands of the boatman. 

A thin mist of sun -rise vapor is 
rising across the overflow through 
which one must row to reach the pools. 



l6'2 



RECREATION. 



How clear the river is ! The boatman 
splashes a rhythm through the eel 
grass. We are coming to the rocks 
around which the black water rushes, 
foams, and curls into deep eddies, melt- 
ing and remelting into its own boiling 
embraces. 

"Throw it out." The boatman bends 
to his oars and the flat bottom craft 
shoots into "the rapturous flood. 

The reel whirs as the fingers of the 
tide snatch the bait and carry it afar. 
What's that? It has come and gone, 
sending a tremor along the silk. 

"It's the eddy. When they strike 
you'll know it. Give 'em a hundred 
yards. The water is deep here. I'm 
off to the big rock in mid stream. 
We'll have a strike in a minute." The 
boatman is both wise and confident. 
Swiftly the water glides away from 
our port as the line vibrates under the 
influence of the spoon. It runs like an 
electric fan. Even the feel of the line 
is soothing. There is comfort in the 
very thought of what is to come. Two 
hundred yards up the river, lord of a 
separate pool, my friend, whose reel 
I nursed, was feeling the same emo- 
tions. In the midst of my reveries I 
got a message from the deep. The 
boatman saw the sign that came to the 
tip of my rod. 

"Give it to him." I struck him in 
the thick of the mouth, and felt the cer- 
tain tug that means so much to he who 
holds the rod. Zing. The reel purred 
a long note and I gave him line. The 
battle was on in earnest and the game 
tugged like a bull pup. Once he 
turned to back rush, but I took in all 
the line he gave me and fought back. 
The lesson angered him and with a 
plunge he fled across tide into shoal 
and quieter water. Once, twice, three 
times I brought him to gunwale and 
then passed him into the net. Three 
and a half pounds. Game enough, but 
not large enough. I took my cue 
from the boatman, who sneered in dis- 
gust. 

"Small fish," I commented. 

"Throw him back," remarked the 



native. Surely there was something 
worth while to come, if this fish was 
frowned upon. Again we returned to 
the pool, crossing and recrossing in all 
twelve times. On each trip we found 
our quarry, taking some and losing 
some. These latter rushed for the 
rocks and three of them took souvenirs 
in the shape of spoons and leaders. 
There is some wild water in the Sus- 
quehanna, and some nasty rocks jut 
from its turbulent bosom. The sixth 
fish pulled my scales out to the six- 
pound notch, while the others fell un- 
der four. My boatman was getting 
irritated. 

"Rotten fishing to-day. We get 'em 
here between fifteen and twenty. Old 
Flynn, of New York, took one last 
week that went nearly twenty-four and 
there's more here like him. Haul in; 
we'll shoot the cataract and try the 
lower pool." I would have gone any- 
where with that guide. He seemed to 
want fish as bad as did his passenger. 
I reeled in the squirming bait and 
trimmed ship. The next instant, with 
three or four powerful strokes we 
swung into mid stream and went leap- 
ing down the channel between jagged 
rocks, bobbing on the crest of froth 
mottled riffles and gliding between oily 
currents that came swelling up under 
our very keel. The bank of the river 
hurried past us like a panorama. Be- 
hind us, up stream, I caught a glimpse 
of the billiard player standing up and 
fighting a battle that from its very ac- 
tivities must have been worth repeat- 
ing in after years. 

"Throw it out again." The boat- 
man rested on his oars an instant and 
wiped his perspiring brow. "If we 
don't take a whale out of here it's be- 
cause we're in the wrong river. It's 
deep in this hole and there's a 
sandy bottom. Use plenty of line." 

Mechanically, I was obeying his in- 
structions. I must have nearly emp- 
tied the reel, when he swung the boat 
around and began pulling slowly up 
stream. 

"Jig her a bit," said he, making an 



STRIPED BASS IN THE SUSQUEHANNA 



163 



involuntary movement with his hand. 
It's so deep here and so hard to pull 
that the spoon don't do stunts about 
half the time." 

I "jigged her a bit" and then some- 
thing struck the full length of my pole. 
The line twanged like a banjo string. 
The tip of the rod flipped into the 
stream and out again with a hiss. 

'"You're on this time. Give him 
more line." The boatman in his zeal 
began to swear in a most immoderate 
manner; introducing a brand of pro- 
fanity that would have put my florid 
friend to shame. But I forgave him 
everything. "Keep it tight. I'll back 
down stream, and you can nurse him. 
Holy herring, but it's a walrus. You'll 
skin the bunch to-day." 

I glanced at my reel and observed 
to my horror that there wasn't twenty 
feet of line left on the reel. "Follow 
him down," I exclaimed, in the hope 
that I could get some fighting tackle 
on the spool. If he decided to rush 
me I was gone. Fortune was with me, 
however, and I coaxed him in slowly 
recovering a hundred feet of line. 
Then he took it with a plunge and 
went straight for the bottom, where 
he did a five minute sulk. I was get- 
ting discouraged. 

"Keep the string on him," advised 
the boatman. "He'll be kicking hard 
in a minute." As if in response to the 
prophesy the lord of the depths shook 
his nose and started in to break rec- 
ords again. I felt the line rising as the 
direction of the pull swept upward and 
to the left. Soon it was straight away 
from the tip of my steel rod. Then, 
about 100 feet away a gleam of striped 
silver rose from the pool and a shim- 
mering spray of crystal clouded the 
center of a commotion that will ever 
live in mine eye. In another second 
he arched his thick black spine and 
plunged into the stream like a mad- 
dened porpoise, shaking his head in a 
frenzy born of despair. 

"He's hooked hard. Fight him to 
a finish" How well that boatman 



knew. Another rush to the surface, 
but this time the water only boiled. I 
took him in a bit that trip and once 
again caught a glimpse of his wide 
spread dorsal fin. Another five min- 
utes went by and the borrowed reel 
continued to gather its victim. Finally 
I got him along side and we slid the 
net under him silently. But he side- 
stepped it and rushed again. Not so 
far that trip and it was easier to get 
him back. Another play with the net 
and the boatman lifted him clear of 
the tide into the bottom of the craft. 
I relaxed a weary arm and planted both 
feet on his body while he thrashed 
himself into exhaustion. 

Look at the index finger on the 
scales. Eighteen and one-half pounds. 
The Susquehanna had treated me with 
Southern hospitality. 

The sun had reached high in the 
heavens and the hunger that is born in 
all men began to declare itself. Re- 
member we missed breakfast. 

"Lunch ?" I looked at my companion 
inquisitively. 

"Sure," was his laconic response, 
and we pulled back to Irwin's ; pulled 
back with a heart full of pride and a 
mouth full of boastings. 

Half an hour later the billiard play- 
er returned with his fish. Two went 
into the eight pound column and one 
hung limp at seven and a half. But 
what's the use of describing small fry. 
The big victory was mine. 

Yes, we fished some more after lunch. 
And the florid man went along. He 
got the fever, too, bringing five good 
ones back about sunset. After dinner 
and dark we took the jerk water train 
back to Perryville, caught a night train 
and returned to New York. 

We three gather once in a while at 
the Nassau street billiard room and get 
reports from the . Susquehanna de- 
votees. On these occasions the florid 
man usually has something to say ; 
something that would lead a stranger 
to believe that Isaac Walton was his 
common ancestor. 



THE TRAGEDY OF TIGER 

BY WILLIAM J. LAMPTOtf. 

The sparrows residing in City Hall Park, 
With no sort of rent to pay, 
Cavorted and tore, 
And chattered and swore, 
And scrapped in a desperate way. 

They grafted the Park in a manner complete, 
From Beersheba clean to Dan ; 

They laughed at the cops 

As they loaded their crops, 
And they feared neither God nor man. 

They were monarchs of all they surveyed, except 
Old Tiger, the City Hall cat. 

Whose greatest delight 

Was his big appetite 
For sparrows from feathers to fat. 

Old Tiger was out for the birds every day 
And never was quite satisfied 

Till he went fast asleep, 

Curled up in a heap, 
With a fat little sparrow inside. 

For years and for years the sparrows essayed 
To do up their feline foe ; 

But the Tiger kept on 

In the way he had gone 
And the sparrows had no- sort of show. 

Till at last by a stroke of straight sparrow luck 
There entered upon the scene, 

One Rags, a bull pup, 

With his visage turned up, 
And he went for the cat on the green. 



164. 



The birds were delighted and so was the pup, 
But Tiger could find no delight 
In fighting to get 
The birds that he eat 
To solace his appetite. 

He wasn't a fighter except in defence, 

But the pup was a gusher galore, 
And Tiger soon found 
That his bird hunting ground 

Was scarcely the same as before. 

The pup and the cat had many a round, 

And the sparrows all stood for the pup, 

Till not long ago 

The pup had the show 
And the jig of old Tiger went up. 

One morning the sparrows descried him dead, 
And they raised such a din of delight 

That the cop on the beat 

Ran off of his feet 
To bring the Reserves to the fight. 

Every sparrow swooped down on Tiger's remains 
And they pecked and they clawed at the same 
So savagely glad 
That the bull pup grew sad 
And rebuked them, remarking, "For shame." 

But little they recked o'er the ruin he'd wrought, 
While ripping the dead Tiger up. 

And sad to relate 

They propose to create 
A saint of their friend the bull pup. 



165 




mmmmmm^mmmmmm 



Solid Comfort in Old Washington. 
By Stanley H. Hopper. 



AN ANTELOPE'S BATTLE FOR HER FAWN 
Reminiscences of an old Plainsman 



BY HOWARD EATON. 



The Bad Lands of North Dakota 
were famous hunting" and trapping 
grounds for many years. 

When Sitting Bull laid down his 
arms he asked that he be given a sep- 
arate reservation for his warriors, 
pups and pappooses, and that the Bad 
Lands should be the center of his 
stamping ground. "Up to the time of 
the ghost dance excitement, the old 
chief and a number of bucks, with 
their families and other live stock, 
hunted along the Little Missouri river 
'every fall. Nothing escaped when 
they surrounded a wood or thicket. 
Anything inch high, or minute old, 
went in those hunts. 

Game was plentiful. Buffalo, elk, 
mule and Virginia deer, mountain 
sheep, antelope, silvertip and cinna- 
mon grizzlies, wolves, coyotes, badg- 
ers, lynxes and cats, otters, prairie 
dogs, rattlesnakes, sage and pintail 
grouse, golden and bald eagles, ducks, 
geese, sandhill cranes, jack rabbits 
and cottontails, with a few cougars, 
made up the game list. Now it is 
composed mostly of stud, draw poker 
and sevenup. 

Indians, coyotes, wolves, rattlers 
and prairie dogs are always in sea- 
son ; but most of the other game is 
gone forever. In '84 a wolverine was 
killed on the river, but it is the only 
one I have ever heard of here. The 
buffalo were wiped out in '83, al- 
though one cow was killed in '84. 
The elk lasted until '90. Some mule 
deer are still in the hills, and more . 
Virginia deer in the bottoms. A few 
sheep and antelope and still fewer 
bear are left. 

In 1899 the Legislature protected 
sheep and antelope for 5 years, and 
in 1901 put sheep on the retired list 
and protected antelope until 191 1. If 

167 



that law had been enforced, we should 
have some game to show in a few 
years ; but between permits to visit 
the Crows, Cheyennes or Gros Ven- 
tres, and hunting permits, the Sioux 
make a clean-up yearly. In '98 In- 
dians, mostly Standing Rock Sioux, 
killed 21 wagon loads of antelope in 
3 weeks' hunting. In '99 they made 
a big killing, while in 1900 one party 
of bucks had 65 antelope in their 
camp. 

The region is nearly 200 miles 
long and 60 wide, so one game war- 
den can not cover the ground, and as 
the Indians hunt in bands, it is tough 
on a lone Christian who tries to stop 
the deal. 

After the buffalo were wiped out, 
antelope in herds of 1,000 to 5,000 
covered the range. At Stoneville the 
price for an antelope saddle with skin 
attached was 90 cents. 

In the winter of '84 and '85 a Rus- 
sian count visited the Marquis de 
Mores, The marquis furnished a 
hunting outfit complete, and the Rus- 
sian hired Vic Smith to hunt with 
him. Vic got the meat to sell and 
the count got the heads. In a few 
weeks they killed over 400 antelope. 

Along in June, '94, I was out with 
the men gathering a bunch of horses 
near Rainy Buttes. Antelope were 
still plenty, and we saw many does 
and fawns daily. 

One evening, shortly before sun- 
set, I saw a sight never to be forgot- 
ten. Just from habit I had counted 
the antelope we had seen that day, 
and up to about 6 p. m had tallied 28. 
I was riding with one cowboy, and 
as we swung over the shoulder of a 
flat butte we rode into a saucer 
shaped hollow about 80 yards in di- 
ameter. I saw antelope number 29 



i6S 



RECREATION. 



across the valley, and a little higher up 
on the butte stood number 30. Just 
then the latter spread its wings and 
sailed off — a big old golden eagle. 
Number 29 was a sure enough ante- 
lope. She stood gazing at us until the 
eagle sailed near her. Then, to my 
surprise, she ran at him, jumped high 
and struck viciously with her foreleg. 
I had never^seen such- a sight before, 
so rode toward the spot and watched 
her chase the eagle as he circled, strik- 
ing at him whenever he came low. 
When she struck, the bird sailed high- 
er and circled, never going far away. 

It flashed on me that the eagle 
wanted fawn for supper.' I ran my 
horse toward the fight, and when 200 
yards away a fawn raised his head 
above the grass. When he saw me 
he tried to jump up, but floundered 
so I knew his back was hurt. I was 
within 50 yards when the eagle made 
a last swoop at the fawn, but the 
brave doe got there first, jumped at 
him and chased him away. 

The poor little fawn tried hard to 
get up and run, but his back was hurt 
too badly. When I picked him up he 
cried like a baby, the most piteous 
bleat, and the doe ran to within 20 
yards of us. The eagle heard the 
fawn cry and sailed within easy shot 
gun range, but the brave little mother 
chased him again. 

An antelope fawn has eyes so soft 
and pitiful that they and that appeal- 



ing bleat will make a man go hungry 
a long time before killing one of 
those prairie babies. 

I found the claws of the eagle had 
lacerated the little fellow's back so 
wickedly, and especially just over the 
kidneys, that it would be well nigh 
impossible to save his life. It was 
during the hot weather, and the kid 
being so young and having so little 
vitality, inflammation would be sure 
to set in. I therefore adopted the 
only human remedy and put him out 
of his misery as quickly as possible. 

As we rode away the poor old doe 
followed us nearly to the ranch. 
Then she stood on a hill until we en- 
tered the corral. I would gladly 
have restored her young to her, safe 
and sound if possible, and would have 
saved her from any such contest with 
possible enemies in the future if she 
could have trusted me ; but her fear 
of her ancient enemy, man, was too 
great to permit her to go home 
with us. 

If some of the 2 legged brutes who 
are so fond of slaughtering wild ani- 
mals could have seen that timid, gen- 
tle mother battle with the eagle in de- 
fense of her young as we saw it, their 
hearts would certainly have been soft- 
ened even though inured to acts of 
butchery, and thus they might be 
more temperate in their use of lead 
when next they started a bunch of 
antelope. 




TO PAMLICO SOUND FOR DUCK 

A Hard Luck Story 



BY ALEXANDER HUNTER 



The five great Sounds of North 
Carolina were apparently at one time 
a part of the ocean, and it needs but a 
small tidal wave to overflow and over- 
whelm the sand bank that for a hun- 
dred miles, separates the sea beach 
from the shore of the Sounds, to make 
old ocean regain her lost territory. The 
Currituck, Albemarle, Chowan, and 
Pamlico Sounds are themselves barred 
by two swamps from each other, and 
continuous navigation is only by canals 
that give access into each, and make 
uninterrupted, inland navigation for 
nearly 200 miles. 

There are many fresh water rivers 
pouring into these sounds, and scores 
of small villages and hamlets crown 
their banks, which, were it not for the 
outlet to Norfolk, Newberne, and Wil- 
mington, would perish from simple in- 
anition ; for there is no back-country 
to support, with its garnered grain, any 
organized community. All merchan- 
dise is either the product of ocean or 
river and such as can be transported 
by water. Roads, turnpikes or rail- 
ways are impracticable, for the whole 
section is but a vast swamp, alternated 
by soggy bottoms and miry woodland. 
The chief exports are pine and cypress 
timber, rafts of which are hauled by 
steam tugs through the narrow canal 
and broad sounds to market. Fish is 
the great staple of trade, as well as 
oysters and wild fowl ; and every na- 
tive is a fisherman and gunner com- 
bined. They work in the spring and 
summer with the net, and in the fall 
and winter with the gun. They are 
all splendid shots by inheritance as 
well as practice, and although the 
North Carolinians living along the 
eastern coast are wretchedly poor, 
their wants are simple and they have 
no trouble in keeping the household 



pot boiling all the year round. The 
women are very industrious, but the 
men are constitutionally lazy, and like 
the Indians, look down upon labor, and 
permit the squaws to do all the drudg- 
ery. Higher up on the rivers, where 
the larger farms are, the condition of 
the people is different ; there can be 
found men of means, who live liberally, 
and whose hospitality has become 
widespread. 

The water of these Sounds is slight- 
ly brackish ; for in the Chowan and 
Pamlico Sounds there is an inlet 
through which the saline water of the 
ocean mingles, making a mixture that 
is neither one thing nor the other ; and 
where the wild fowl which haunt either 
the brine or the fresh water, can find 
suitable food, though the quantity and 
quality of wild fowl is markedly dif- 
ferent from that of the sounds, for 
farther South, the water deepens, and 
the wild celery grows less. Then, 
again, where the ocean flavor is strong, 
this esculent, that the Canvas-back 
and Redhead are so fond of, is killed 
by the saline properties. 

Several years ago I learned that the 
Pamlico lighthouse, situated on a large 
marsh just where the Pamlico river 
empties into the Sound, was about to 
be abandoned by the Government, on 
account of the rapidly increasing 
shoals in its vicinity. Inquiry at the 
Treasury Department confirmed the 
truth of the rumor, and I immediately 
wrote down to the natives of that vi- 
cinity, asking if the place afforded any 
sport in the way of wild fowl. In an- 
swer, supported by the statement of the 
lighthouse keeper, they assured me the 
gunning was excellent. So I appeared 
before the lighthouse board, and made 
application to have the property turned 
over to me for a shooting resort; and 



169 



170 



RECREATION 



backed by strong naval friends of rank 
this was done. 

Making a visit in the summer, I 
found the buildings were built of brick, 
solid and substantia^ the tower large 
and commodious. I was much pleased 
with the spot especially as it was al- 
most inaccessible, for gunners could 
not get within miles of it. 

I returned to the city and formed a 
club of enthusiastic sportsmen, who 
anticipated royal sport in the coming 
winter. 

Never was a party so completely 
fooled. Four of us opened the cam- 
paign as soon as the cold weather set 
in, by starting off with enough ammu- 
nition and supplies to run a garrison. 

We had to leave Norfolk in the 
Newberne steamer and travel 150 miles 
through the canals and sounds. It was 
a most tiresome journey. The novelty 
soon wore off. The boat proceeded at 
a snail's pace, often getting aground 
in the canals, and frequently waited 
hours for the long rafts of cypress and 
pine logs, pulled by the sputtering 
tug, to get by without fouling the 
wheels. 

It took all day and night, and then 
the steamer hove to within several 
miles of the spot, and we were rowed 
ashore. We came near being swamped 
a dozen times. 

The next day was spent in getting 
our traps ready and stringing our de- 
coys, and before day the next morn- 
ing, we were off. 

About 9 o'clock that night we 
reached the lighthouse, tired, mad, 
broken down, and as utterly disgusted 
a set of men as 'twere possible to find. 
A dozen ducks constituted our spoils, 
and each told the same story : No 
canvas-back, redhead, mallard, spoon- 
bill, nor anything except a few brant 
and a straggling black duck. 

We had a plain talk with the keeper 
and learned the reason. 

Right across the Sound somefffteen 
or twenty miles was a great inlet, called 
Orinoke, where twice every twenty- 
four hours the ocean billows swept in 



and salted the water brought into the 
Sound by the Pamlico river, so that it 
was alternately brackish and saline. 
Not a mild mixture, but decidedly 
strong. As there were no flats nor 
banks, of course the brant did not 
congregate there, and there was noth-. 
ing for other varieties of wild fowl to 
feed upon. 

Another day in the blinds brought 
forth no better results, and two of our 
party determined to start for home, 
and not wait for the steamer Manteo, 
which passed, outgoing, once a week. 

The only way to strike civilization 
again was to get the keeper to take 
them in a sail boat to Newberne, some 
sixty miles distant, from whence they 
could take the cars for the North. 

It was a long and uncertain trip, and 
if the wind should change, or a nor'- 
easter set in, there was no telling when 
they would arrive ; but go, they would, 
and for a $20 bill the keeper said he 
would try it. 

My comrade, Geo. Randall, after 
consultation, determined to_ remain 
with 'me; a conclusion we both bitterly 
regretted when too late. 

The following morning dawned 
clear and fair, with a most favorable 
breeze, and they started, leaving at the 
lighthouse, Randall, myself, the keep- 
er's wife, a boy about twelve, and 
Nancy, a buxom damsel from the 
mainland, who had come over to cook 
and wait upon us, and run the house. 

The nearest settlement to the light- 
house was Goose Creek Island, some 
ten miles away ; a swampy, piney place 
that boasted of several hundred na- 
tives, who lived almost as isolated from 
the world as the inhabitants of the lone 
isles scattered about the Pacific ocean. 

They are a sociable set, as we found 
to our cost, and with about as much 
delicacy as a Piute Indian. We had 
come well prepared for the trip. One 
large box held the ammunition, which 
we had fondly hoped to use knocking 
over the wild fowl that imagination 
pictured in immense flocks. Another 
hamper contained provisions : meats, 



TO PAMLICO SOUND FOR DUCK. 171 

canned goods, and groceries, while a tinued feast before. They gulped 

ten-gallon keg contained as fine a down oysters by the can, potted meats, 

grade of Malaga wine as was ever fer- sweetmeats, sauces, condensed extracts 

mented in the tropics, besides a demi- of beef and mutton, washing it down 

John of the ardent. with copious libations, and in forty- 

Our intention was to stay a month, eight hours they had cleaned us out of 

and we all thought our supplies would everything, and only a pile of empty 

be amply sufficient. Had we known cans and drained kegs were left, which 

the character of the Goose Creek Is- they looked at sullenly, wiped their 

landers, we would have chartered a mouths on the back of their hands, 

steamer, armed her with carronades, slouched out and silently hoisted sail 

hoisted the American flag, and treated and departed for their homes, where 

them as pirates. we devoutly hoped every mother's son 

About two hours after our friends of them might have an attack of cramp 

left, we descried a small flotilla of colic. 

sailing boats making for the island, George Randall had been a gallant 
and Nancy informed us that the na- soldier in his teens ; in the Black Horse 
tives were paying us a sociable visit. cavalry, and later, a miner in the far 
We welcomed them at the landing, and West for thirty years ; after he had 
Shades of Laveter ! what a set. Fully made a fortune he returned to his na- 
a dozen, each having the same charac- tive State, Virginia, to spend it. He 
teristics : tall, slab-sided, and bony, had that wild Western hospitality, 
There was not enough fat among the which shares his ranch and bottle with 
whole crowd to make a single rotund his guest. But even he was outraged, 
man. Their faces were sallow from George was not a temperance man, 
countless attacks of ague fever, their and when he examined the keg and 
eyes dull, their noses long, their the demijohn and thought of the fu- 
mouths wide with a gutter on either ture, his composure was greatly ruffled, 
side, worn by the dripping tobacco and he denounced the gang , in terms 
juice. Their hands were horny and both loud and eloquent, 
knuckled, and their feet enormous. For several days thereafter, the 
They were men of few words, and weather being fine, the boy Gus hoist- 
after a grunt and a nod, sank into an ed the sail of his boat and we headed 
impassive silence. An invitation to for some prominent point where we 
drink started the whole crowd as if would place our decoys and sit in 
touched by an electric battery. No weary vigil over them until night, oc- 
bar-room hanger-on could advance casionally bringing down a stray black 
with such alacrity on an invitation to duck or a brant. Only once did I have 
"walk up and take something." They any kind of sport. Gus and I went off, 
literally charged on the house, and leaving George at the lighthouse, 
each man filled his glass to the brim. where, he said, he preferred to brood 
Then they coolly hauled in their boats, alone ; but in reality, attracted by 
took down the sails, made themselves Nancy's black eyes and queer vernacu- 
at home, and actually remained at the lar, albeit her ideas were few, and but 
lighthouse two days, eating and drink- illy expressed. But, oh, horrors ! 
ing, in a way I never believed possible Nancy played the accordion and sang ! 
for mortal man to do. Camels, it is The instrument- was an old, battered 
said, have three stomachs, but these family heirloom, half of the stops re- 
Goose Creek Islanders can stow away fused to sound, and the balance wheez- 
more in one stomach ; and when it ed, shrieked and groaned, whistling in 
came to filling twelve, our provisions such a way as to give a timid man a 
soon melted away. I doubt whether congestive chill, or a nervous woman 
any of them ever had such a long con- convulsions. 



172 



RECREATION 



Nancy had naturally a sweet voice, 
but her repertoire was limited to a few 
camp meeting hymns. The worst of it 
was, the voice was only heard at inter- 
vals, for the erratic instrument went 
off by fits and starts, and howled like 
a demon undergoing torture. As the 
keeper expressed it, "like it was a goin' 
to bust its wind." 

George hinted to Nancy that it gave 
him the nightmare, but Nancy knew 
nothing of hints, and had often been 
complimented on her playing, by her 
rustic beaux, so every evening, after 
her day's work was done, and we drew 
near the fire, out would come that in- 
fernal accordion, drowning even the 
noise of the beating billows outside. 

As I was saying : Gus and I rowed 
out in the Sound about ten miles to 
Porpoise Island, and took position on 
the extreme end, and surely Nature 
intended this very spot for a blind, for 
the island tapered off to an acute point 
which ran far into the Sound. On the 
end was a clump of grass that served 
perfectly to conceal the gunner. Our 
decoys, some 200 in number, made a 
gallant show. Out in the Sound were 
scattered duck, but no flocks. Taking 
position, I directed Gus to conceal the 
large boat higher up, and to take the 
light skiff that we had brought in tow, 
and make a wide detour and slowly 
drive them toward the point. Gus 
begged me to loan him one of my guns, 
as he said, "to get shut of the crip- 
ples." I promptly declined, knowing 
that if Gus had anything that could 
shoot, he would chase every duck 
away, within twenty miles of the 
Sound. 

His face fell, but he departed on his 
errand, and soon a light breeze sprung 
up, and I sat and watched the decoys. 
They were beauties, made at Havre de 
Grace, Md., and most of them were 
new. I had placed them to ride free- 
ly without coming in contact with 
each other, and each duck breasted the 
ripples like a veritable thing of life. 

Half an hour passed and I was get- 
ting tired of doing nothing, when two 



pintails came paddling up to the de- 
coys. I knocked them both over, but 
as the water was five feet deep I could 
do nothing but wait for Gus with the 
skiff. I could see him about a mile 
distant, lying flat in the boat, and using 
the creeping paddles as I had instruct- 
ed him. There were many scattered 
ducks heading for the point; they 
came up fearlessly, and I scored two 
more. I could see that they had never 
been shot at, for they had advanced 
straight as an arrow, when disturbed 
in their feeding. 

Again and again, little groups of 
two to a half dozen swam fearlessly 
up to the decoys, and in all my experi- 
ence, I never saw the like, or had such 
poor sport in wild fowl shooting. 

After a dozen shots the sporting 
fever left me entirely, for in no in- 
stance did the ducks fly; they simply 
swam up and were shot down. There 
was about as much exhilaration in it 
as in sitting on the granary steps and 
knocking over farm yard fowls as they 
scratched for food in the ground. I 
soon wearied of it; and amused myself 
with trying the distance at which I 
could kill them with double BB. 

I made some long distance shots, and 
only wished that I had brought my 
Winchester along, for it would have 
been splendid practice. 

It was now well past noon, and the 
shooting was over for the day, and 
probably for some time; for these 
Pamlico Sound ducks seemed to have 
an invincible dislike to flying, and most 
likely few remained in one locality. 

I signaled Gus to return, and getting 
into the skiff, we picked up the game. 
The birds were nearly all in the same 
spot where they were when shot, for 
there are no tides in the Sound, and no 
perceptible current. 

Gus was made happy by my placing 
him in the front seat and giving him 
my light No. 10 to shoot the cripples, 
of which there were several, and he 
was so excited that he fired standing 
several times, and came within an ace 
of overturning the boat. It reminded 



TO PAMLICO SOUND FOR DUCK. 



173 



me of a tale Charles Hallock used to 
tell, of old man Beasley, who lived 
on the Rappahannock near Port Royal, 
Va. He was over seventy, but still 
handled his gun well. Whenever the 
ducks arrived, he would take to his boat 
and get an old darkey to push him. 
He had a singular trick of throwing 
his body forward just as he pulled 
the trigger, so as to neutralize the 
shock of the gun, for he was exceed- 
ingly thin and spare. 

One day he saw a big flock of mal- 
lards feeding-. He put an extra heavy 
load in his muzzk loader, and taking 
his seat in the bow of the boat was 
silently propelled toward them. When 
within about sixty yards, the old man 
rose to his feet, cocked both barrels, 
took aim at the ducks and just as he 
pulled the trigger, remembering the 
heavy load, he gave his body an extra 
heavy lurch forward to meet the re- 
bound of the gun. Now the old man 
was in such haste that he forgot to put 
caps on his gun ; as he pulled the trig- 
ger both hammers clicked, and there 
being no recoil to counterbalance the 
impetus, he went head over heels into 
the freezing water and was nearly 
drowned before he could be hauled out. 

The fine weather which had greeted 
our approach now changed, and old 
Boreas awakening in his cave, let loose 
all the winds that blow. A veritable 
tempest raged, and the booming of the 
billows as they struck the ocean shore, 
though several miles distant, were dis- 
tinctly audible when the careening 
winds sank in momentary silence. At 
times, such was the fury of the blast 
that came sweeping unchecked over 
thousands of miles of open water, that 
we dared not open the door for fear 
of being blown bodily away. Great 
billows from the Atlantic, overlapping 
each other, came on in serried lines like 
a great cavalry charge, and the waves 
soon covered our low-lying island. The 
salt rollers swept and swirled around 
our dwelling, and every now and then 
the froth and spume would be driven 



through the cracks of the door and 
casements. 

We did not feel alarmed, for the 
dwelling was of brick with unusually 
thick walls, which we felt sure could 
withstand any force from the wind 
and waves. Had the dwelling been of 
wood, it would have been a different 
matter; but as the house would shake 
from the buffets of the wind surges, 
it was no sedative to the nerves to 
know that we were cooped up in a 
building surrounded by raging waters. 
It is true there were two or three boats 
riding at anchor, but to have attempt- 
ed to get off in them in such a howling 
storm, would have been suicide. So 
we sat glum and silent. Nancy grew 
frightened, then hysterical, and 
brought forth her accordion, and after 
a prelude, she commenced to sing a 
hymn ; and sang it in such a way, and 
sent forth such blood-curdling sounds 
from her musical utensil, as to chill us 
to the marrow of our bones. As 
Nancy became more impassioned and 
unearthly, the wife of our host who 
was in the next room began to wail. 
Gus, as brave a boy as ever lived, sniv- 
elled in sympathy, and his dog (Gus 
called him dawg) came out from a 
dark corner, gave a yelp or two, show- 
ing that he was rising to the occasion, 
then returned and relieved his feelings 
by growling to himself. The fiercer 
the storm roared without, the higher 
the din waxed within ; Nancy seemed 
inspired, and was a Sunday school, 
choir and camp meeting all in one ; 
with her eyes set in an ecstatic stare, 
as if she already beheld the portals of 
the blest, she sang those hymns in a 
way little dreamed of by the author, 
and the accordion, never since it was 
glued together, had it been put to such 
a strain ; it seemed to have caught the 
contagion and become possessed. It 
was a fair fight : the chrieking winds 
and the thundering billows on the one 
side, with Nancy and the accordion on 
the other — the blare, the clatter, the 
uproar, was something appalling. 
George, who had learned profanity in 



174 RECREATION 

the mining camps of the far West, put denly in the midst of her hymns. The 
his mouth close to my ear and yelled : woman inside ceased her moaning, the 
"General Sherman said war was hell, dawg wagged his tail once more, Gus 
what would he have said if he was crawled from under the bed, the wind 
here ?" Amidst all the tumult of the outside slackened, the waters subsided, 
elements, it is but fair to say that the and George and I shook hands solemn- 
accordion took the sweepstakes. From ly. There was a doubt in both our 
the inner bowels of that wonderful in- minds as to which emotion was strong- 
strument there came such discordant er : joy, because the long drawn-out 
tones as rarely ever split the circum- agony of that infernal accordion was 
ambient air. The thing' by turns bel- hushed forever, or relief, from having 
lowed, screamed, howled and groaned, been delivered from sudden death, 
and when Nancy put on extra power, There was no doubt as to the state of 
it combined all the sounds at once ; and Nancy's feelings ; she might have felt 
then there was an infernal discord in- grateful because she was not drowned, 
deed. But even this was preferable to but grief, genuine unadulterated grief, 
the tremolo that ran from a cavernous over the wrecking of the~ family heir- 
grumble to a paralyzing shriek which loom was all absorbing; she gave way 
would end in a wail so startling that to a fresh burst of tears every time 
even Gus lost his nerve and dived tin- her eyes fell on the nurtured, bursted 
der the bed, while the dog scratched instrument. "What will the folks at 
frantically at the door in his efforts home say," she moaned. "We can't 
to get outside. George looked as if sing hymns without the 'cordion." 
he longed for death. Nancy's arms Gus cheered her a little by remark- 
were working like a wood sawyer's, ing that he knew a blacksmith who 
and the wrapt look in her eyes showed could patch up her innards, 
that she was under the divine spirit The next day a revenue cutter 
and saw visions. steamed up to the island and we were 
If this thing had kept up much long- courteously invited by the captain to 
er we would all have been either raving take pasage to Norfolk — we jumped at 
maniacs or gibbering idiots, when all the chance, and as we steamed away 
at once with an awful roar, it bursted the last sight we beheld was Nancy on 
its insides, and the only answer to the top of the tower, like Black-eyed 
Nancy's convulsive workings was a Susan, waving her handkerchief to the 
swish of wind. Nancy stopped sud- vanishing craft. 



WHERE JOY RETURNS 

BY IRENE POMEROY SHIELDS. 

Just under the white birch trees, 

Close to a sentinel pine ; 
On the bank of a lake my tent is set 

And the joy of life is mine. 
Morning dew and evening breeze, 

Starlight, shade and shine ; 
Song of bird and hum of bees, 

Tangle of shrub and vine; 
Wandering wind and washing wave, • 

Whisper of birch and pine ; 
Rustling leaf and flashing wing, 

And Nature's hand in mine. 







Drawn by Roy Martell Mason. 



A KINDLY REMINISCENCE 



BY DUDLEY RUSHTON. 

J kin recollect the time 

When the brook wuz chuckling low, 
The casts I made, the fish I caught, 

With a gal of long ago. 



RAINDROPS 

By Agnes Lockhart Hughes 

Knocking against my window pane — 
Fell the drip -drip of the silver rain — 

Like tears by an angel wept. 
When a teasing wind came rollicking by — 
And the raindrops fled with a farewell sigh — 

But one in a rosebud crept. 
It lay like a gem on her heart of gold, 
And hearkened the tales that her lovef bold — 

Breathed to this blushing flowei. 
Then a sunbeam sped from his home on high— 
And carried the raindrop up to the sky- 
Where he wooed her for one short: hour. 
Silent — queen night, came creeping down, 
In search of a pearl for her jeweled crown, 

And she leaned o'er the sunset s bar. 
There in a sea of amethyst, 
She found the tear that the sunbeam hissed 

And fashioned it into a star, 

A glittering silver star. 



176 



A MIDSUMMER MISADVENTURE 

BY MRS. JOS. S. GiBBS. 

We went for our summer outing, my most northern point of the most north- 
husband and I. We wanted to "rough ern lake, to the end of the route, in 
it." We "roughed it." We wanted a fact. 

new experience. We got it. Some I cannot describe that trip on the 
one whispered "Canada, Muskoka lakes. You'll have to go there your- 
Lakes district." We wouldn't let them self to see, to dream, to drink it all in. 
finish the whisper. That sounded so Islands, water, richest foliage, blue 
easy, so "rough," so experimental, sky and beauty everywhere. Poetry 
Besides we were too superior to listen seemed all around us ; the peace and 
to advice, or need it. quiet was only broken by the songs of 
On our knowledge we decided not the water and the music of the trees, 
to carry any camping outfit, for in But I was destined to take one fall 
the wilds of Canada we could surely from the sublime to the ridiculous, 
find all the necessities, nay, even the which so often happens in our little 
luxuries of life. lives, for a sailor disturbed my con- 
As the hunting season does not hap- tent with, "Please, Mum, and your 
pen to begin the latter part of July, and dorg have set in the red paint." Sure 
we were taking our outing at that enough, poor Mac, in the desolation 
time, we foolishly, but as it afterwards of the "hold" had transformed him- 
turned out, fortunately, selected five self from English to Irish setter, from 
guns from my husband's rack, and the waist down, if a dog can be said to 
secured enough ammunition to blow possess such a proportion, 
up the entire Russian fleet. We really Gradually twilight stole upon us 
did have sense enough to take fishing and the sun dropped to sleep as the 
tackle, particularly fancy bait, although great summer moon arose about us. 
we afterwards found that Canadian Little by little as the merry, noisy va- 
nish are not epicures, but, like the cation-seekers left the boat at the dif- 
woodsman, prefer the daintier diet of ferent landings, the glory and peace of 
salt pork. I mustn't forget the soap, the night increased and intensified. 
We took enough to start a laundry for But the journey had to come to an 
the woodchopper and Indian guide to end, and at half after nine we landed, 
appear in fine linen all the year round. There is only one hotel at Port Cock- 
To add to our excess baggage, my burn, and we were indeed fortunate to 
husband insisted on taking a flatiron, find a vacant room, the last in the 
weight nine pounds. What for ? To house. And how we slept ! 
help with the laundry, I imagine. All The next morning we began ener- 
this, and no camping outfit? Such is getically to look for a guide and a 
the conceit of superior minds. camping- outfit. Neither were forth- 
So the three of us — please remem- coming. We begged, implored, grov- 
ber that Mac, our English setter, is elled. We were answered by a ques- 
one of the family and always goes tion, "Why hadn't we brought an out- 
with us — started for our destination; fit?" Answer, "Because, having a com- 
just where that was we didn't know. plete one, we had, with the wisdom of 
Nothing of importance happened thoughtfulness, carefully packed it 
until we found ourselves at the end of away in storage." Still another em- 
the Grand Trunk Railroad, and on the barrassing question, "Why hadn't we 
Muskoka wharf. It was then we de- written and engaged a guide?" We 
cided to board the boat and go to the refused to answer questions. 

177 



i 7 8 



RECREATION 



But the proprietor of the hotel had 
a tender heart and, finally, pitying us 
in our childishness as "from the 
States," kindly offered to lend a tent. 
It eventually proved to be spacious 
and leaky. We had progressed so far 
and sat down to patiently await the 
coming of a guide. 

It was not hard to wait. With boat- 
ing, walking, and fishing, the time 
can't hang very heavily on one. 

About the third morning there, four 
of us started to walk to Clear Lake, a 
distance of about a mile through, the 
dense woods ; great ferns growing as- 
high as your waist and above; rasp- 
berries, juicy and luscious, just beg- 
ging to be picked and eaten. 

'We followed what we took to be 
merely a trail — it turned out to be a 
government road. On we walked. 
Mile after mile with no break in the 
woods. No Clear Lake. At last we 
realized that we had lost our way. 
Midday was a thing of the past. Mac 
looked hollow. We felt as he looked. 

Still we walked on. Good nature 
and a sense of experience kept us go- 
ing. At last, about three in the after- 
noon,, we saw a clearing ahead of us. 
Columbus never felt more thankful. 
Our spirits revived and we hurried on 
to sink down, thirsty, worn out and 
hungry, in the soft grass before the 
door of a simple, humble cabin. But 
the beauty and the pathos in that little 
home! 

A quaint old woman greeted us. 
She was bent with years and work, 
but the spirit of the old-time courtesy 
remained, and there was a kind word 
for each of us and a hearty welcome. 
As she afterwards told us, they seldom 
saw "folks" more than four or five 
times a year. She and her aged hus- 
band had lived there for thirty-five 
years and had seldom been out of the 
clearing. One room downstairs and a 
half room above, it reminded one of a 
doll's house; no plaster, no laths; just 
the plain board walls covered with 
newspapers and hung with a few col- 
ored prints, cut from ancient maga- 



zines that had found their way to the 
little old couple after months of vari- 
ous travel. Everything was immacu- 
lately clean and we were graciously 
welcomed in that one little room where 
we ate, as for one, have never eaten 
before or since, good old-fashioned 
bread and milk. 

When we had finished we wandered 
out of doors again and laid on the 
grass, surrounded by cultivated wild 
flowers and currant bushes. Every- 
thing was ours while we'd stay. Our 
host sat before us and told us of his 
life. He didn't fish and he hadn't a 
gun. Oh ! no ! he couldn't bear to see 
the poor happy wild things die. The 
fish owned his lake at the foot of the 
garden and the deer were his friends 
and companions, and the only living 
things they saw during the winter, 
when many times they were snowed 
in for months- at a time. Besides, had 
we forgotten? They were God's crea- 
tures. 

As if in answer to his plea, out of 
the woods at that moment there darted 
a fawn, with absolute confidence as to 
its reception. It stopped short at sight 
of the strangers, however, and viewed 
us with great, pleading eyes, and then 
as quickly turned and, quivering with 
fright, hurried back to the kindly shel- 
ter of the trees. 

We were silent for some time : it 
seemed as if Nature was asserting her- 
self in this simple old man and his wild 
friends. 

But we couldn't stay there always, 
we must be going; but how could we 
ever leave? We felt we could never 
walk back over all those miles. 

My husband stretched himself and 
left us with the assurance that he 
would hunt up a four-in-hand at least. 
He must have walked some three ad- 
ditional miles in so doing, but his ef- 
forts were at last rewarded and, late 
in the afternoon, we, who were pa- 
tiently waiting, heard a rumbling, a 
fearful racket, and then his shout. 
Another moment and we beheld our 
chariot. 



A MIDSUMMER MISADVENTURE 179 

Description fails me. The four and a beautiful lake on either side, 

wheels were fairly well matched, We were eight miles by road from our 

though all the spokes were more or nearest neighbor, and three miles 

less distant cousins. On top of the across the lakes with a mile to walk 

four wheels there swayed what had on landing. Beautiful trees grew all 

once been a wagon box ; its own moth- around us, young saplings, ferns and 

er wouldn't have recognized it now. berries on all sides. There were no 

A two-year-old colt and an old brown snakes and I could wander about in 

mare were tied to the front. I can't comfort. Here we pitched camp and 

say harnessed, as the original leather while my husband and George, our 

work was lost in a maze of buckles, guide, were busy building our domi- 

ropes and strings. One thing our coach cile. and trimming the grass around 

sadly lacked — springs. There was a us, Sandy, our coachman, Mac and I 

bit of hay in the fore of the rigging, drove sixteen more miles for provi- 

and we of the female persuasion were sions. 

packed carefully in. Mac, ever a la- We came at last to a general store, 

dies' man, crowded in between us. After ordering a wagon-load of eat- 

The masculine portion sat as best they ables, the storekeeper refused to sell, 

might on the beams behind, the re- the day being Sunday; but he'd fill 

mains of the one-time floor of the box, our order and I could send the money 

and let their feet dangle none too over any time it was convenient. Oh ! 

gracefully through the openings. no! 'twas not that he trusted us, but 

We said good-bye to our old friends, he knew we had no way to escape 

taking as a parting gift, a small bou- without paying. 

quet of flowers tied with a bit of red It was dusk when we returned and 
worsted. I found two very hungry men. Our 
We started. Have you ever driven big tent was up and George's smaller 
over a "corduroy road?" Have you one in progress of erection. On one 
felt each log independently as you side was our stove and stone fireplace, 
struck it — felt it intimately and per- a clothesline and table, our dining- 
sonally ? Have you been driven by a room and kitchen combined, under the 
genuine native — one of the kind with great pines. Inside the tent stood four 
whiskers before and behind,, so you posts, forked like sling-shots, through 
couldn't tell whether he was coming the forks of which were laid poles, and 
or going? But I want to say right across the poles were green boards, 
here that the native could drive. Over split on the spot by our guide. They 
ditches and down rocks, around cor- constituted our springs. Great arm- 
ners and through ruts. I doubt if an fuls of hay made a mattress, heavy 
expert driver of civilization would at- blankets were the bedding, and boat 
tempt, or even dare attempt, that road cushions the pillows. It was now my 
back to the hotel. turn to add my part and while the sup- 
Within a couple of days a guide per was cooking, I spread a pink mos- 
turned up and then began an experi- quito netting over the four posts, hung 
ence I would not have missed, so full a mirror on a tent pole, covered the 
was it of amusement, happiness and pillows with unbleached muslin, turned 
danger. My one regret is that we had a box sideways, the top to serve as a 
broken our camera on the way up and dresser and the inside as a medicine 
so lost many, to us at least, valuable chest. On our steamer trunk I placed 
pictures. books, magazines, a case of ammuni- 
We drove to a place called "Part- tion and — a box of candy. In the cor- 
ridge Point." An ideal spot. ner I stacked our guns and hung coats, 
It was a bit of peninsula, with one hats and raincoats on scattered nails, 
wagon road, a narrow river before us Then we sat down in our wooded din- 



I&> 



RECREATION 



ing-room and ate sait pork, brown 
bread and weak coffee with a gusto. 
Then to bed. And how we slept that 
night, regardless of a rainstorm and a 
leaky tent ! ' My poor bones did ache 
in the morning, though, for I'm not 
accustomed to board springs. 

What a merry two weeks! Deli- 
cious fish from the lakeside river, fresh 
berries every meal, a dip in the cool 
water at twilight, on a sanded bottom 
that didn't hurt one's feet 

It was in this retreat that I learned 
to shoot — at target or pieces of wood 
which our guide spent hours tossing 
into the air for me, my imagination 
turning them into real game. Then I 
grew bolder and aimed at a few spar- 
rows, a chipmunk or a squirrel. Mac 
is so partial to a broiled squirrel. 

Such covies of birds as we saw ! 
Would that it had been the season ! 
We were always coming upon them 
during our strolls through the woods. 

But we also had our adventures. 

It was a cloudy night and I was 
restless at the sultriness of the weath- 
er. I just couldn't sleep. So without 
disturbing my better half, I crept out 
of the tent and wandered about in the 
sweet-smelling fern. I had no fear. 
We were so far from civilization. 

As I looked towards George's tent, 
where our supplies were kept, I saw 
what appeared to be two small lights. 
I sat on the rock near the tent and fell 
to wondering why George was sleep- 
ing outside, and if he was, why had he 
lit his lantern and left it there among 
the ferns, for so it looked. The lights 
fascinated me and I found my vision 
held fast. Presently the lights began 
to move. Why didn't George speak 
if he was awake, for he could surely 
see me ? It was all too uncanny. Then 
silently and slowly the lights moved 
forward ! I could stand it no longer 
and hurriedly slipped in beside my 
husband. Directly I heard footsteps 
about the tent. I felt^I'must scream. 
Instead I did the next best thing; I 
called out, "George !" No answer. 
Again; still silence. My husband 



awoke. He listened and he heard. 
Seizing the rifle that lay at hand at 
the head of the bed, he called to Mac, 
but Mac is a bird dog, and only whined 
and slunk nearer to the bed. So my 
husband stepped out alone. A mo- 
ment of suspense and terror ! Then 
bang ! bang ! bang ! from the rifle ! 
George was with him in an instant. 
I heard the breaking of the tall under- 
brush and the word "bear." I was 
alive at once and frantically called to 
them not to go needlessly into the 
thicket, where they would be at a dis- 
advantage ; a few more shots and then 
they listened to me and returned. We 
listened but silence had fallen once 
more. In the morning they beat the 
underbrush and followed the foot- 
prints. Some hundred rods away 
from camp they found my lantern and 
a huge, gaunt black bear. 

There hangs his skin now. Need I 
say that I took no more nocturnal 
strolls ? 

Our vacation was at an end, On 
Monday we were to break camp. Sun- 
day night one of George's heirs 
brought word that his "Missis" was 
very ill. Willingly we supplied them 
with whiskey, quinine and Jamaica 
ginger, and sent father and son home, 
a distance of six or eight miles. George 
gave us his word to be in camp by five 
the next morning to pack us up and 
off, as our chariot would arrive at 
nine. We were satisfied, and so he 
left us. 

We anticipated a night alone in 
camp, just my husband, Mac and my- 
self. 

It was a perfect night. The moon- 
light reflected every fern on the} walls 
of our tent with exquisite tracery. 
We retired at about ten, happy in our 
quaint loneliness. 

I've always vowed that although I 
am the only daughter of an only 
daughter, there must have been a mis- 
take and that I was intended really to 
be the seventh son of a seventh son. 

My protector was asleep almost as 
soon as his head struck the pillow, but 



A MIDSUMMER MISADVENTURE 



181 



I laid awake with that awful feeling 
of impending danger, growing more 
and more intense every moment. Final- 
ly the suspense overcame me. My 
voice was gone and in a strangled 
whisper I awoke my husband. "Some- 
thing is moving outside, maybe an- 
other bear." He was very sleepy but 
to relieve my fears he crawled out, 
took up the gun and stepped to the 
door. I saw his figure straighten up 
on the instant and his voice rang out 
in the night : "Go away and don't come 
back or you may get hurt." The gun 
was cocked and ready for use, for 
there in the moonlight, not twenty 
yards away, stood two Indians. Sto- 
lidly, without a word, they turned and 
left us, as we too well knew, only tem- 
porarily. 

There was no more sleep for us that 
night. We were dressed in short or- 
der and waiting. For what? Why 
had they come? Not to scalp us, that 
was sure, for the days of the toma- 
hawk and Indian warfare are over. 
Then the truth flashed through our 
minds. They had learned in some way 
that our guide had left us ; likewise 
they knew that we had guns and am- 
munition ; they had come to steal. That 
was their object. It would be easy to 
overpower one man and frighten one 
poor woman. No one would ever 
know who had done it, and by morn- 
ing their canoes would have taken 
them far away. 

A thousand other thoughts flashed 
through my mind. I watched the 
walls of our tent and thanked my Cre- 
ator that it was moonlight and all ob- 
jects were as shadow pictures on the 
canvas. For in my mind I had visions 
of those two Indians crawling, one on 
either side of the' tent, and as one 
would surprise my husband, who 
would turn to the attack, the other 
would seize him from behind. 

Silently we sat in the doorway and 
watched. My husband with his shot- 
gun loaded, and I directly behind him 
with the rifle ready for him on the in- 
stant, the box of ammunition beside 



me for reloading, and the three other 
guns all ready for active duty. 

An hour or so passed. The dread- 
ful quiet continued. And then di- 
rectly before us, peering from the 
thicket, I saw that hideous face and 
those two eyes. I bit my tongue, to 
keep from hysterically screaming and 
touched my husband's arm and point- 
ed. He raised the gun and fired, above 
that evil face. The head disappeared. 
He took the rifle and fired three times 
into the air. I reloaded. And again 
we waited. 

Again, silence. I began to hate the 
moonlight and its tedious monotony. 
In the distance a loon cried out and a 
lonely hoot owl" wailed in reply near 
by. Every moment seemed an hour. 

Finally I stood upon a chair and 
peered out into the fern around us. 
Thank God I did. For there in the 
deep brush — oh ! blessed moonlight ! — 
crawled two human fiends. Between 
the teeth of the foremost one I saw the 
glitter of a knife. On they came; 
silently, stealthily, sneaking in the 
grass. I was frozen, paralyzed with 
fright. But with a mighty effort I 
pointed. My husband jumped to the 
chair beside me. He, too, saw. Like 
a bugle his voice rang out: "I don't 
want to kill you, but I'm going to hurt 
you." He had the shotgun. Report 
after report rang out from the Win- 
chester. I saw the leader drop his 
knife and quickly turn and drop on 
his stomach. It seemed as if I was in 
the midst of battle. There we stood 
alone, my husband firing into space. 
Our enemy had disappeared. Then 
of a sudden we heard the soft paddle 
of an oar as a boat left the shore. 
Softer grew the sound, and we looked 
at each other for the first time. Had 
they left? The question went unan- 
swered. We were afraid to stop 
watching. 

I lit a match and looked at my 
watch. Three o'clock only. Would 
the night never end ? 

Then through the silent air came a 
sound that to my dying day I'll never 



182 



RECREATION 



forget. To-night I can hear it as it 
echoed across those lakes. Instinc- 
tively I reached up and kissed my hus- 
band. 

The days of Indian warfare are 
over indeed, but the savage still re- 
members his battle-cry ; so shrill, pierc- 
ing, uncanny. I can never get it out 
of my mind. We felt that they had 
gone only to return with their friends. 
We knew now we were powerless. 
They had been angered. They could 
kill us in that lonely spot and no one 
be the wiser as to the murderers. An- 
other awful yell ! Then the silence of 
the grave. And I knew no more. 

When I came to, after what seemed 
to my poor husband an endless uncon- 
sciousness, the moon was setting and 
the sun was rising; and earlier much 
than we expected him, George was' 
coming towards us. 

The night was over and we were 
alive. 

When it was sufficiently light and I 
was sufficiently strong, we began our 
hunt. 

Here at hand is a common hunt- 
ing knife which the Indian had 
dropped. It lies on our desk. We 
tracked them to the landing. There 
we found blood. Some of our ammu- 



nition had done the work, and we had 
indeed hurt one at least. 

We hastily broke camp and as soon 
as our chariot arrived, loaded and hur- 
ried to the Port. 

There we learned that two Indians 
and their squaws were camping on a 
small island in one of the lakes, but 
that so far only chickens and vege- 
tables had been missed. A party start- 
ed for the island at once. They found 
the remains of a hastily broken camp, 
an Indian fire, and every token of a 
hurried departure. That was why they 
had not returned. One had evidently 
been wounded and they preferred not 
to take chances by returning, but to 
escape and put considerable water be- 
tween themselves, the law, and us be- 
fore morning. 

That was the last we heard of them, 
for we left by the afternoon boat, to 
the land of electric lights, crowded 
thoroughfares and policemen. 

It was a most adventuresome vaca- 
tion. Of pleasures manifold, of expe- 
riences — thank you, enough. Yet, now 
that it is over and we are alive to tell 
the tale, I wouldn't have missed it for 
all the Newports or Bar Harbors of 
the world, even if they are replete with 
safety and comforts. 



A LESSON 



BY IRENE POMEROY SHIELDS. 

I have drank o£ Marah's draft 
Plucked the Dead Sea fruit for food, 
Now the wine of life is at my lips, 
I find it exceeding good. 
Sleepless nights and toilsome days , 
Strifes that sear and burn , 
Ceaseless cares and endless fret, 
Worries at every turn. 
Gone like mist or morning dew, 
While I from Nature learn, 
Lessons deep and grandly true, 
The simplest may discern. 




One of the "Inky Boys." 
By Emma L. Williams. 



SHORT VACATIONS AFOOT 



BY CHARLES FRANCIS SAUNDERS. 



In spite of the inventions of the 
age, walking still remains, on the 
whole, the best means of transporta- 
tion to Nature's heart. There is no 
forest glen so remote, no mountain top 
so rugged, but the human foot may 
persist in the quest of it long after 
steam or electricity, the bicycle or the 
horse, has had to succumb. Further- 
more, to the foot traveler, many a cot- 
tage door opens that is shut to those 
who go more pretentiously, and so he 
has an advantage in the opportunity 
to learn at humble firesides and at rus- 
tic doorsteps, many a bit of local plant 
lore that the writers of books have 
never recorded. Indeed, so whole- 
some a recreation is walking and so 
close does it bring one to the soil and 
its tillers, that we of America might 
advantageously imitate the wander- 
jahr of the old time German youth, 
who, his schooling done, was sent out 
from the home roof to travel afoot for 
a twelve-month for the educational 
profit to be so reaped. Better still, if 
we were to devote a week or two 
every year to such a return to Nature, 
walking each day along ways before 
untrodden by us, and lying each night 
under a different roof, learning direct- 
ly from Nature's lips lessons which 
books can never teach us. 

To be sure, the degree of instruc- 
tiveness and enjoyment of such an 
outing depends much upon one's per- 
sonal temperament. To gain the most 
from walking, one needs to be a lover 
of "the quiet life," for, like fishing, it 
is, after all, a recreation for the con- 
templative. It calls emphatically for 
that simplicity of mind which includes 
the ability to enjoy the day of small 
things. Its devotee finds a keen zest 
in the quaint talk of the roadside 
chance acquaintance, in every little 
happening by the way, in all natural 
sights and sounds and smells. He 
loves the fragrance of the new-mown 



hay, and the shuttle-like music of the 
mowing machine at work ; the melody 
of the rippling runs, and the feel of 
the wind blowing upon his cheek. He 
delights in the sight of the sunlight 
as it sifts downward through the lay- 
ered branches of the hemlocks, and in 
the shadows as they rest for a mo- 
ment in the lap of the hills or drift 
across some upland meadow where the 
red lilies dot the tall grass. Such 
things have the power to lift him for 
the time out of a world where the al- 
mighty dollar reigns, into God's world 
where the coin of the spirit is current. 

Such knowledge as the present 
writer has of plant life, has largely 
been obtained from devoting for a 
series of years his annual summer va- 
cation of two weeks to rural pedes- 
trian trips, proceeding by rail to a 
suitable starting point and returning 
by rail from the walk's end. No one 
who has not tried it, can imagine the 
rare delight of day after day devoted 
without hurry to the study of the wild 
flowers as they grow — of exploring 
ravine or wood, bog or meadow, as 
fancy dictates, renewing old acquaint- 
ances year after year and ever making 
new ones. 

The observation of plants with re- 
spect to their environment is an espe- 
cially charming branch of nature 
study, and these vacations afoot offer 
peculiar opportunities for its pursuit. 
From even the commonest plants there 
is much to be learned ; for instance, 
the sort of insect company they keep 
and the way in which they receive 
their guests ; their behavior under 
varying atmospheric conditions, as 
sunlight and shadow, or af the differ- 
ent times of the day, as in the early 
morning and at nightfall ; their meth- 
ods of bearing seed and how these are 
distributed. Many a bit of knowl- 
edge under these and kindred heads is 
revealed to the watchful observer as 



184 



SHORT VACATIONS AFOOT 185 

he passes among the flowers in their This will provide your walk with sys- 

native haunts, or ' sits among them tern, which will save you perhaps 

while he rests or eats his luncheon. much aimless wandering. It is advis- 

Indeed, it is a frequent fault with able to plan the route in such a way 

novices in plant study to ignore the that each night finds you at a village 

commoner plants and continually hunt or town where you can lodge at a 

after rarities, but the veteran comes public house. Putting up at farm 

increasingly to respect even the weeds houses wherever night may overtake 

of his yard, for he realizes as did the you, sounds well in theory, but is open 

poet of the familiar "flower in the to the disadvantage that not every 

crannied wall/' that they may hold farmer wants to care for travelers and 

secrets never yet guessed by science, some that entertain you are disin- 

Then, too, the knowledge of the popu- clined to take payment for the accom- 

lar names applied to plants in our modation. Either of these cases is un- 

country is still very meagre. The col- comfortable. Of course, one. may not 

lection of these names with their rea- be able to reach a hotel every night in 

sons for being is a fascinating branch sparsely settled regions, as in the 

of folk-lore, and can be most conve- Southern Alleghanies, where one may 

niently done by the man afoot, as he travel a hundred miles and never see 

chats across the fence with some rus- a tavern. In such districts, however, 

tic herbalist, or is given a lift by some there are always people who make a 

old-fashioned country doctor on his practice of entertaining travelers for a 

leisurely round in his gig. small charge. 

The best season for these trips in A prime factor in your enjoyment 
the Eastern States is, perhaps, early will be a minimum of baggage. There- 
summer. Then the weather is apt to fore, it is well to carry with you noth- 
be settled, the verdure is still unaf- ing heavier than a light gripsack. In 
fected by the heat and drought that this may be packed necessary toilet 
come with midsummer, and the days articles, slippers, a pair of socks (in 
are the longest of the year. As for case of wet feet) and a gossamer wa- 
the region to walk in, one can scarcely terproof for rain. Your manual of 
do better than the mountains. There botany may be put in there, too, if it 
the air has a certain bracing quality does not fit your coat pocket. A lar- 
that enables one to walk much fuither ger satchel containing such other arti- 
without fatigue than in the lowlands ; cles as you may desire, can be sent a 
and the flora, including as it generally day or two ahead of you by express, 
does denizens of woodlands, bogs and and re-expressed from point to point, 
glades, is varied and likely to be rich unless your walk is entirely remote 
not only in everyday plants, but in un- from railroads, in which case the coun- 
usual forms also. In selecting your try stage will perform the service. As 
mountains, however, you will do well these hints are not for the professional 
to avoid as much as possible mining collector of plants, your plant press 
regions and those which the lumber- may be left at home; but a small tin 
men have stripped. Such places are box that may be carried in the pocket 
usually bare of interesting vegetation will be useful for the temporary stor- 
and their desolation cannot but affect ing of specimens that have baffled 
your spirits, though a glimpse of them your first efforts to identify, and which 
may be of value in the lessons which you wish to work out later, 
are so conveyed. The expense of foot travel in the 

Having decided upon the scene of mountains is never high, unless you 

your outing, you will find it an advan- follow fashionable routes in the sum- 

tage to buy a pocket map covering the mer hotel districts of such regions as 

region chosen, and from it plan the the White Mountains or the Catskills. 

route for each day of your vacation. Even there, however, modest stopping 



1 86 



RECREATION. 



places at reasonable rates are to be 
found. The cheapest country I ever 
visited, was at the same time the rich- 
est in floral interest, namely, Western 
North Carolina. There, from thirty to 
fifty cents will pay for a supper, lodging 
and breakfast, and as much buttermilk 
as one can drink at noon may be had 
for the asking at almost any cabin. 
That low rate, however, is exceptional. 
A dollar a day is the rule in unpreten- 
tious mountain districts, but as your 
lodging will sometimes be in the small 
towns where there are better houses, 
it is well to count on a daily average 
of at least a dollar and a half. It will 
save you some annoyance if you will 
carry plenty o>f small change, as it is 



possible to embarrass a whole town- 
ship by tendering a five dollar note to 
be broken. 

Conspicuous styles of dress, such as 
golf suits and pedestrian outfits 
evolved from the fertile brain of some 
city tailor, are best avoided in back- 
woods rambles, if you want the peo- 
ple to receive you on equal terms. 
That they shall so receive you is to 
contribute no small part to the value 
of these outings ; for so do we gain in 
sympathy and respect for our fellow 
countrymen the lines of whose lives 
are cast in out of the way corners of 
the land and whose loyalty and pa- 
tience and thrift are sinews in the na- 
tion's greatness. 




A Little More Timet 



THE CRUISE OF THE "HOBO" 

The story of two Americans who made a seven hundred mile cruise in a sixteen 
foot canoe on the St. Lawrence. Two months of sight-seeing and pleasure at a 
cost of $50 apiece. First of a series of educational articles for Recreation readers 

BY E. C. HAMILTON. 
With photographs by the writer 



All through the spring and early sum- 
mer, Brooks and I had been planning this 
trip, and now, every obstacle surmounted, 
we were actually at our starting point, Bur- 
lington, Vermont. 

On our arrival, August 2d, from New 
York, we found the canoe, dunnage, and 
box of provisions awaiting us in the freight 
house. After transferring our supplies to 
the club house of the "Lake Champlain 
Club," where the manager made us wel- 
come and extended to us the freedom of 
the club, we repaired to the hotel for our 
last night of civilization for many weeks 
to come. 

In preparing for a previous trip, I had 
been greatly helped in making up my outfit 
by reading various accounts of experienced 
campers. While not agreeing wholly with 
any one of them, in almost every case I 
got new ideas. For the benefit of the un- 
initiated, I give a list of our general out- 
fit and personal belongings : 

A sixteen-foot canvas-covered canoe. 

Two maple paddles, 5-3 and 5-6. 

Lateen sail, area 2,$ feet. 

A tent J 1 /^ x 7^4, with heavy rope ridge. 

This tent could be stretched between 

two trees, making poles unnecessary. 

Two folding camp cots — weight, 12 lbs. 

Two blankets each. 

Two dunnage bags. 

One nest cooking utensils, as follows : 

Two kettles. 

One frying-pan. 

One coffee-pot. 

Two plates. 

Two soup bowls. 

Two knives. 

Two forks. 

Two dessert spoons. 

Two teaspoons. 

Two cups. 

These all fitted into the larger kettle and 
this into a neat canvas bag. 

One dozen small food bags, for meal, 
flour, pork, etc. 

One large bag to contain the smaller 
ones. 

One axe. 

Gun. 

Fishing tackle. 

One large rubber blanket. 



CLOTHING. 

Two sets of medium-weight woolen un- 
derwear. 

Three pairs woolen socks. 

One pair sneakers. 

One pair karki trousers. 

One paddling shirt. 

One heavy woolen sweater. 

One slouch hat. 

Two bath towels 

One waterproof coat, extending below 
the knees. 

Two silk handkerchiefs for neck. 

Two cotton handkerchiefs for pocket. 

One roll toilet articles. 

One small medicine chest. 

Tobacco, etc., according to taste. 

The cots may be considered a luxury, but 
anyone who has ever camped on Lake 
Champlain knows that much time and labor 
are saved by carrying a light cot. This 
also proved true on the St. Lawrence. 
In this region, balsam boughs do not grow 
on every bush, and the choice frequently 
lies between sleeping on the rocky shore 
or gathering boughs from a distance. The 
canoe was guaranteed to carry 750 pounds ; 
we carried something over 350 pounds. 

The next day dawned bright and clear, 
and after making a few additional pur- 
chases we proceeded to pack the entire outfit 
between the thwarts, covering the whole 
with the rubber blanket. We then dipped 
our paddles for the first stroke of our 700- 
mile cruise. 

Port Kent, ten miles away across the 
lake, was reached in two and ' one-half 
hours, against a slight wind. Here we left 
our canoe in charge of the dock master 
and visited Ausable Chasm, which well re- 
paid us for the time spent. The chasm is 
only three miles from the lake, but the 
short railroad which connects it with the 
Delaware and Hudson saves the walk. 
Upon getting back to the lake at two 
o'clock, we paddled three miles north and 
made camp on Ausable Point, where t!ie 
river enters the lake, forming a large 
marsh. 

We started early the next morning with 
a moderate wind which steadily increased, 
until by the time we reached the southern 
end of Valcour Island it was blowing half 



187 



1 88 



RECREATION 



a gale and had kicked up an ugly sea. We 
should have stopped here, as this is one of 
the historic points on the lake. Off the 
southern end of this island the first naval 
engagement of the Revolution occurred on 
October II, 1776, and on clear days the 
wreck of the "Royal Savage," one of the 
English fleet, may still be seen resting on 
the bottom. But the traveling spirit was 
on us and we hoisted sail. The breaking 
waves frequently came in over both gun- 
wales as we tore along, there being only 
about five inches of freeboard. On reach- 



ancing the canoe as much as possible with 
our own weight, we now gave little atten- 
tion to the sea, but put all our strength 
into efforts to reach the beach. The over- 
loaded boat made but slow progress, how- 
ever, and we were still a hundred yards off 
when another large wave broke completely 
over us and I felt my seat sink from under 
me. Over we both went, but after taking 
a few strokes were agreeably surprised to 
find that we could just touch bottom. We 
rushed the canoe, which was full of water, 
in through the breakers, and when she 




Dipped Our Paddles for the Other Shore 



ing Crab Island, just outside 'of Platts- 
burg, we ran in under its lee and debated 
as to whether we had better try to cross 
to Cumberland Head, a mile and one-half 
away. This meant paddling directly across 
the wind, but as we did not relish the idea 
of spending a day in camp, we decided to 
make the attempt. 

This run proved to be the most exciting 
open-water canoeing I have ever experi- 
enced. The waves were running four and 
five feet high and continually breaking be- 
fore the strong wind. By careful paddling 
we avoided the combers until we were 
about half-way across, when we ran into 
waves which had an unbroken sweep from 
Split Rock Point, thirty-five miles to the 
south. Even here we shipped little water 
until we saw bearing down upon us an im- 
mense wave, which from my position in the 
stern I saw would' break just as it reached 
us. I tried frantically to turn stern on, 
but too late. The wave caught us on the 
quarter, and picking us up, rushed us for- 
ward on its crest, then broke, filling the 
canoe half-full, the water pouring in over 
both gunwales. The probability of ship- 
ping another wave was greatly increased 
by the water that weighed us down and 
robbed the canoe of its buoyancy, and we 
were still a half-mile from shore. Bal- 



grounded set to work to unload as quickly 
as possible. After getting the outfit all out 
and spread over the rocks, we found to our 
satisfaction that the canvas bags had made 
good and that nothing had been lost 
through our mishap. The canoe covering 
had been cut in several places from pound- 
ing on the rocks. After repairing these we 
spent the rest of the day in drying out 
that part of our dunnage which had not 
been protected from the- water. 

Lake Champlain can, I find, kick up as 
ugly a sea in as short a space of time as 
any body of water I have ever been on. 
Mr. Benjamin, ex-Minister to Persia, at 
whose camp we stopped on our return, told 
me that though he had traveled long dis- 
tances on sailing vessels in different parts 
of the world, he had never sf;£n as wicked- 
looking waves as he saw cwning over the 
breakwater at Burlington one day in the 
late fall. 

An early start the next morning enabled 
us to cover some thirty miles, reaching 
Rouse's Point, where we made camp north 
of the town with one foot in the States and 
one in Canada. Here we heard the first 
French, for though the town is three miles 
this side of the line, fully half of the in- 
habitants speak that language. 

Early the next morning we paddled up 



THE CRUISE OF THE " HOBO 



189 



under the walls of Fort Montgomery, and 
after landing and going over the old ram- 
parts, continued on up the Richelieu River 
to St. Johns. The river proved to be beau- 
tiful in a way, but the shores were too 
marshy to make good camping ground. St. 
Johns being twenty-four miles from Rouse's 
Point, this made a good day's work, espe- 
cially as the wind had been against us all 
day. We pitched our tent in a little strip 
of woods about a mile below the town. 

Here at St. Johns we found a fine canoe 
club. Much interest is taken in the sport, 
"two race meets being held every year. In 
fact, this was the only town we stopped at 
where much is made of canoeing, and our 
canvas-covered canoe was, much to my 
surprise, quite a novelty. As we sat by our 
cheery campfire after supper, pleasure par- 
ties were constantly passing up and down 
the river, some in launches and many in 
canoes. All seemed to be having a fine 
time, and we heard their merry voices long 
after turning in. 

As we did not know what might be be- 
fore us the next day, we got an early start, 
and after procuring a "clearance" started 
through the canal. This clearance cost us 



loaded canoe down, except in the early 
spring, so we were forced, much to our re- 
gret, to go through the canal. 

After a paddle of half a mile, we reached 
the first lock. There were seven boats 
ahead of us, and as we did not care to run 
the risk of entering the lock with one of 
the unwieldy canal boats, we carried around 
it, and as the wind was blowing steadily 
from the south, hoisted sail and reached 
the first lock at Chambly in a little over 
two hours. 

As we wished to see Montreal and the 
Lachine Rapids, we made inquiries as to 
the distance and the possibility of getting a 
wagon to carry us and our canoe overland. 
The Richelieu and the St. Lawrence here 
run almost parallel, so that it is only fifteen 
miles across country at Montreal, while 
the water route by way of the Richelieu 
to Sorel and then up the St. Lawrence is 
about ninety. 

The lock-keeper agreed to carry us the 
fifteen miles for $3, so we struck a bargain 
and sat down to eat our lunch of bread, 
butter and apple sauce, while he went to 
harness his horse. When he finally appeared 
I doubted whether we should see Montreal 



.;-ff< : % 



. , .. ■. 





Lake Champ-lain Can Kick Up an Ugly Sea 



25 cents, and was a very elaborate affair, 
giving our tonnage as one ton, name of 
ship, name of master, destination • and 
cargo; but with it went the right to be 
locked through, while' without it we should 
have been compelled to carry around the 
locks, of which there were seven — one at 
St. Johns and six at Chambly, at the other 
end. There are twelve miles of rapids 
here, but they are too shallow to take a 



that day. The wagon-box was exactly six 
feet six inches long by measurement, and 
into this we had to load our sixteen-foot 
canoe, camp dunnage and three men. We 
got there, but it is a fine advertisement for 
the Maine builders that there was anything 
left of the canoe. The roads were awful, 
but between my wrestlings with the canoe, 
to keep it in the wagon, I had opportuni- 
ties to note the country and people. 



190 



RECREATION 



It is a marvel to me how England was 
able to take Canada, and after taking it to 
keep possession. The people, in this dis- 
trict at least, speak French entirely, and 
seem wholly French in their sympathies 
and customs. There were many French 
flags flying, the launches and boats carry- 
ing them and many of the boat-houses 
along the Richelieu. 

We arrived at Longueuil, opposite Mon- 
treal, at three o'clock and launched our 
canoe on the famous St. Lawrence. As 
rain was threatening, we cast about for a 
camping spot, but the outlook was dismal 
indeed. Nothing in sight but houses and 
farms on our side and the city on the 
other. Finally, after paddling down about 
a mile below the town, we applied to and 
obtained permission from a farmer to camp 
in his orchard. After supper, the tent was 
invaded by about a dozen young Canadians, 
who kept up a continual jabber in French, 
while we did our best to entertain them; 
though I was not in the best of humor at 
the sight of five of them reposing on my 
light cot. However, as there was no way 
of warning them off with my limited stock 
of French, I had to trust the cot and guar- 
antee which gave 500 pounds as its capac- 
ity. After a somewhat warm and animated 
debate as to whether our tent would leak 
in a heavy rain, they finally departed. Then 
Brooks, who had been giving an occasional 
groan ever since we reached the river, con- 
fided to me that on the way over the driver 
had persuaded him to fill his pipe with 
some Canadian tobacco, and he was now 
taking the consequences. 

However, he was all right the next morn- 
ing, and leaving our camp in charge of the 
farmer, we walked to Longueuil and took 
the ferry across to Montreal. After spend- 
ing about two hours wandering about the 
city, we took "The Seeing-Montreal Car," 
fare 50 cents, and spent two hours in visit- 
ing the noted landmarks. This trip in- 
cludes the ride around the famous moun- 
tain for which the city is named. From its 
summit a fine view of the surrounding 
country is obtained. When one has but 
one day in the city this trip affords the 
best means of seeing the principal places 
of interest. 

After dinner, a half-hour's ride by trol- 
ley brought us to Lachine, where we took 
steamer for the nine-miles' run through 
the rapids. The "Sovereign" was making 
the trip, and on account of her size the 
rapids were not so impressive. On Sun- 
day, when the smaller steamers run, the 
effect is much finer. After supper in the 
city we returned to Longueuil in the even- 
ing. 

Started away on our 180-mile run to 
Quebec the next morning with a hearty 
send-off from the farmer and his family. 



The son, a graduate of the Montreal Vet- 
erinary College, insisted upon our taking a 
glass of wine with him before leaving. 
Courtesy is a marked characteristic of' the 
people, and in this they remind me of the 
mountaineers of North Carolina, among 
whom I have spent some time and whose 
hospitality is entirely unselfish. 

Our camping-ground that night was five 
miles from Sorel. We had covered forty 
miles, due mainly to the strong current 
which whirled us along at such a speed 
that there was little resistance to the dip- 
ping paddles. Neither of us had ever been 
on the river before, and enthusiastic friends 
had prepared us for some fine scenery; but 
that first day's travel proved very disap- 
pointing. The shores were low and flat and 
lined with the houses of the poorer class, 
not even having the redeeming feature of 
being picturesque ; while the islands with 
which this portion of the river is dotted 
and which we had looked forward to as 
promising camping sites, proved to be mere 
mud flats. It was with difficulty that we at 
last found a camping-place which did not 
form a part of somebody's front yard. 

We awoke to hear the sound of wind- 
driven rain on the tent the next morning, 
but as there were no inducements to linger 
in our present dreary camp, we took a 
hasty breakfast, packed our dunnage and 
started for Sorel. Flere we stopped long 
enough to get our mail and allow the cus- 
tem's official to charge Brooks $1.50 on a 
suit of under-clothes worth about $2, and 
then started on. 

After paddling about three miles, we 
reached the western end of Lake St. Peter. 
Here the river broadens out into a shallow 
lake, ten miles wide by twenty-one long. 
Camping time found us about four miles 
down the lake on the southern side, with 
the rain coming down in sheets and noth- 
ing in sight but marsh. It was certainly a 
dismal outlook, but after making a cold 
supper we decided the only thing to do 
was to push our boat through the rushes 
in search of a firm bit of ground with two 
trees for the tent. Paddling in as far as 
possible, we got out into water and mud up 
to our knees and pulled the canoe about 
two hundred yards farther to a small hil- 
lock of firm ground. Leaving the canoe 
here, after covering up the provisions, we 
shouldered the cots, blankets and tent and 
floundered on a quarter of a mile through 
tall marsh grass to a strip of woods. It 
had been pouring all day and everything 
was saturated, while the ground under us 
was little more than a bog; so a fire was 
out of the question. How we longed for 
the dry birch bark of the north woods ! 
But, making the best of a bad job, we 
pitched the tent and after setting up the 
cots, crawled into our blankets. And it 



THE CRUISE OF THE "HOBO" 



19! 



was a case of keep well covered up or die 
of the mosquitoes. I have yet to camp in 
the Barren Grounds, where they tell won- 
derful and awe-inspiring tales of the insect 
pests, but if they are any worse than the 
hordes we encountered in that swamp I 
shall take sheet armor when I do go. How- 
ever, the man who can not make the best 
of such a situation had better not go camp- 
ing, for if ill-nature be added to his other 
troubles at such a time there is little hope 
for him. Here our cots were not so much 
a luxury as a necessity. 
" The next morning dawned beautifully, 
and we pulled out in the wee small hours 
and waded out to the canoe, which we 
found half-full of water. Unable to have 
the consolation of even a cup of hot coffee, 
we filled up on the remainder of our cold 
beans and started, determined to get out 
of the lake, as soon as possible. The scen- 
ery proved to be very uninteresting in 
every way. The southern shore, which we 
followed, was low and fringed with rushes 
for a quarter of a mile out into the lake, 
while the water, except in the steamship 
channel, which follows the north shore, is 
very shallow. We saw many ducks, but 
being good sportsmen, refrained from 
shooting. Made the outlet about twelve, 
after a paddle of sixteen miles. Here we 
took a bath from an old dock and then 
proceeded to cook a good hot meal of 
cornbread, flap-jacks and coffee, and even 
went the length of opening our one pre- 
cious can of soup which we had saved for 
an emergency. 

The current runs with great swiftness 
as it leaves the lake, so we had no trouble 
in passing the city of Three Rivers about 
four. Camped a mile below the city in a 
fine grove and spent a comfortable nigbt in 
strong contrast to the discomforts of the 
night before. A large passenger steamer 
came to anchor just off our camp, and we 
could distinctly hear the music from her 
cabin. Three, Rivers is half-way between 
Montreal and Quebec. The ninety miles 
we had covered in just three days, very 
good work considering our load; but the 
current had carried us along, so that pad- 
dling was easy. 

The following day had a very pleasant 
surprise in store for us. We started at 
eight and after paddling three hours came 
suddenly on the most beautiful view we 
had seen since leaving Lake Champlain. In 
place of the low shores the banks